New Petition Asks Kodak to Revive Kodak Infrared Ektachrome Film

Lead Photo by Steve Harwood. Used with Creative Commons Permission

A new online petition on Change.org is appealing to Kodak to bring back yet another film emulsion: Kodak Infrared Ektachrome. This film is not to be confused with Kodak Aerochrome–which we’ve featured very prominently on this website. Kodak discontinued the film along with a lot of their infrared films due to people just not buying it–as is the case with lots of films being discontinued. However, with a new generation of photographers starting out in digital and then picking up film afterwards coming to the fore, Infrared film may have a new home soon.

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Wallpart May be Illegally Selling Your Photos

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Earlier this month, we reported on claims of Wallpart stealing the images of many artists. A Change.Org petition was put in place to get them shut down. It got the signatures they needed, but the site is still operational.

According to Wallpart’s Terms of Service, the company states that they don’t steal from artists. According to the site

“Wallpart.com only helps the user to find the images interesting him, the site uses data of the most known third-party search engines. Process of search happens at user’s browser.”

In our previous reporting, they further stated that the images aren’t uploaded to their own servers and instead hosted on third party servers. Finally, they also don’t claim responsibility for the images that the users purchase–which quite honestly sounds very shady.

This morning, a reader emailed us to inform us about an image of his that was stolen. He won a contest that we did before, and found the image on their site. After taking a look through their site’s search bar, we found that not only our photos can be sold without consent, but those of many very big and famous photographers can also be sold.

Hit the jump for a better idea. If you go to the site and and do searches, you’ll find even more.

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Wallpart Shop Accused of Stealing and Selling Images


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When photographers and artists learn about their work being stolen, they absolutely get angry. But when a retailer goes ahead and takes the images to sell for their own profit while cutting out the artist, then a bigger problem starts. Change.org currently has a petition against just such a thing.

Wallpart, an art retail store, has been accused of stealing photographs and creations from artists on DeviantArt–a community where lots of artists display their portfolio. At the moment of publishing this piece, they’re just shy of the 1,000 signatures needed.

From what the petition page states, Wallpart was contacted for commentary but they didn’t respond. From the looks of things, it also appears that this petition has been up for around a month and was started by Chelsea Cooper of Kansas City.

Indeed, there are many things that can happen now. The artists can all individually sue the company or demand royalties on sales. Artists may want to do individual things based on who they are.

Oddly enough, Wallpart’s Terms of Service state that they don’t steal from artists. According to the site “Wallpart.com only helps the user to find the images interesting him, the site uses data of the most known third-party search engines. Process of search happens at user’s browser.” They further state that the images aren’t uploaded to their own servers and instead hosted on third party servers. Finally, they also don’t claim responsibility for the images that the users purchase–which quite honestly sounds very shady.

Hopefully, an agreement of some sort will be settled or the story will grow into a larger case.

Photographer Petitions Canon for a Left Handed Camera

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Canon 7D MK II review product images (2 of 10)ISO 4001-30 sec at f - 4.0

Though it is rarely ever brought up, the idea of a left-handed camera isn’t really a new one. But one photographer is trying to petition Canon USA on making it more of a reality. Photographer Sylvia Cacciatore is currently running a Change.org petition to ask Canon’s higher ups to design one. The story goes much deeper though. Sylvia is disabled–she had brachial plexus injury at birth that caused complete paralysis of her right arm, which also caused her arm to never fully develop. Indeed, it is a heartbreaking disability that causes lots of limitations.

According to the petition:

“Some of the challenges I experience while using my camera are with the shutter and the settings buttons. The majority of the buttons are located on the right side of the camera and certain shots require quick pressing of certain buttons and dials.  I am unable to do because I have to lower my camera and reach over to the other side to change settings, which has caused me to miss many photo opportunities.”

Sylvia contacted Canon because she wants to make photography her profession, but the reps told her to go for the Powershot line instead. “I felt discriminated against because the challenges I experience with their products appeared too insignificant for them to address.” states Sylvia. “Their lack of empathy made me, as a customer, feel unimportant and it made me lose hope that Canon truly cares about their consumers.”

To be fair, the Powershot lineup is also designed with the right handed in mind but offers excellent image quality like with the G1X Mk II. Sylvia pinged us to inform us of the 1,000 signatures needed for the petition. But it brings up an even bigger issue of ergonomic design for those with disabilities.

New Petition is Trying to Revive Kodak Aerochrome

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Image by Dan Zvereff. Used in our previous interview with him.

For all the lovers of the analog world out there, you should know that a recent Change.org petition to revive one of the greatest films that the world has seen: Kodak Aerochrome. Shooting Film first caught wind of the story and states that UK based Jasmin G is calling on Kodak Alaris and the Lomography company to revive the film. Lomography tried to do a variant called Lomochrome Purple, but it totally isn’t the same thing. While Lomochrome puts an emphasis on purple colors, Aerochrome put it on a pinkish purplish red.

How do they do this? For starters, Aerochrome was an infrared film originally developed for surveillance reasons. Years ago, the US would fly planes over the Congo and other regions with dense vegetation to find guerilla troops. When developed, the film would render the greens into a color like what you see in the image above that leads this story. However, later on the commercial world started to use it for art projects. Dan Zvereff and Richard Mosse are two famous photographers that come to mind at first. We have a full introduction to the film at this link–which also explains how it works.

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