5 Square Format Cameras You’ll Love to Get Your Hands On

Lead photo by Reinis Traidas

The Square Format is an absolutely lovely format when it comes to shooting photos. It delivers a really nice symmetry that can sometimes be very difficult to work within when it comes to creating photos. But for many years, it was the standard on Instagram. Square Photos also seem to have a special charm about them; and I strongly suggest that every photographer try it.

Here are a number of our favorite square format cameras.

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Review: Lomography LCA 120

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Lomography LCA 120 product photos (1 of 7)ISO 2001-200 sec at f - 4.0

Earlier this year, Lomography announced the smallest 120 film camera with automatic metering ever made: the LCA 120. Traditionally, no photographer that uses 120 film on a regular basis has ever consistently wanted to shoot with a fully automatic mode. This is why many of these cameras have interchangeable backs, lenses, and various settings. There were also various medium format rangefinders, but those are another story.

The LCA 120 is a medium format (6×6) automatic metering camera with the only variable being ISO control. Focusing involves flipping a switch for zone control. Otherwise, this camera is also the most straightforward and simple medium format camera that I’ve ever touched.

This makes the LCA 120 arguably one of the best cameras that the Phoblographer has tested for street photography.

So what’s the problem?

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Lomography Introduces the New LCA 120 Camera

LCA 120 Lomography

We didn’t think that it could be done, but Lomography has surely done it. Today, the company has come out with something seriously and amazingly cool for medium format photographers. Building on the success of their LCA+ and LC-Wide cameras, the company has created the LCA 120–the same camera as their 35mm versions but able to take 120 film.

In a way, we could easily call this a medium format point and shoot with program exposure shooting. Unfortunately, it doesn’t have aperture control like the original LCA did, but much can still be done with this camera.

It sports a 38mm f4.5 lens–which roughly translates into around a 24mm equivalent somewhere between f2.8 and f3.5 in the 35mm film equivalent world. They’re also claiming a very compact body, square image types, multiple exposure capabilities, and rear curtain flash sync for really creative images.

Plus, the lens is made of glass–just like the other LCA cameras. It’s going for $429; which isn’t terrible at all for medium format. More images and specs are after the jump.

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