Martin Ruffin Double Exposes His Slide Film to Make Art

“Fundamentally, I want to make photos that represent my own experience of reality,” says UK based film photographer and record producer Martin Ruffin about his photographic style. He hopes to be shooting film for many years to come and experiments with a variety of stock for this. He’s also an advocate for shooting consistently, to understand better what one prefers to specialize in.

Continue reading…

Review: Zeiss 35mm f1.4 ZM (Leica M Mount)

Upon purchasing a Leica CL, I figured it was time to dive into reviewing more M Mount glass; and what better place to start than with the Zeiss 35mm f1.4 ZM. For years now, I’ve been smitten with Zeiss lenses and most manual focus glass in general. Their lenses are fantastic, and are often highly regarded even amongst the M mount community of users. Offering a 35mm field of view in addition to being rangefinder coupled, the Zeiss 35mm f1.4 ZM ([amazon_link asins=’B00TDL05XO’ template=’PriceLink’ store=’thephobl-20′ marketplace=’US’ link_id=’5782977b-fddb-11e6-9692-8d1f0c3f6ca6′]) works well with both mirrorless digital cameras and M mount camera bodies.

Oddly enough, though I’ve always loved Zeiss lenses, they’ve never made a 35mm lens I’ve seriously been smitten by. Upon handling and using this lens though, that has changed.

Continue reading…

Review: Kodak Ektar 100 (35mm and 120; Various Formats)

For a really long time, if you wanted very vivid colors in your film photos you needed to go to a slide film–but when Kodak introduced Kodak Ektar 100 things changed. Photographers were able to get punchy, vibrant, saturated colors with the ease of use that negative film provides. To this day, Kodak Ektar 100 is used to a variety of applications with one of the most common ones being landscapes. However it is also in use for portraiture as its low ISO value allows for incredibly sharp photos.

And for many lovers of digital cameras, this may also be one of your favorite Kodak film emulsions.

Continue reading…

Kenneth Leishman: Compelling Color Pinhole Photography

1500px 72 dpi blur - Copy

All images by Kenneth Leishman. Used with permission.

Pinhole images I’ve always thought were absolutely stunning, beautiful and the absolute best works of art when it came to landscape photography. But in my years as an editor, I’ve never seen a good one done in color–until last week.

Photographer Kenneth Leishman is who “along the way of experimenting with jobs I did not care for, and things I did not need, a camera fell into my lap.” he tells us. It took a while for Ken to find his groove, but when he did he realized that he loved the analogue process and that the slow ways of working with pinholes is what really jived with him.

Continue reading…