Photojournalism, Permission Rights and The Social Web: A Combination That Works Least for the Photographer

While there are loads of award winning photographers in the best agencies, newspapers, and wires the future of photojournalism seems to be changing more and more to where quite honestly, the photographer has the least amount of importance in most of history. Just recently, a photo of a woman in a dress being arrested by well armed police men made the rounds like wildfire online. Part of getting this shot involved access that working with those big companies can get you. It also comes with publication after publication using the image without permission or licensing for their own reasons. It’s theft–and part of this has to do with how the social web works.

But is this the future of photojournalism as we know it? This has been asked before, but is it really, truly the future of the format?

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Entry Level DSLRs are Better Than We Think

Most readers of this site use Entry Level DSLRs of some sort. Semi-pro and professional photographers like me don’t always tend to give those types of cameras the full credit they deserve. After seeing things like a Sony A350 survive time in a freezer and Fred Miranda’s Rebel XT survive a fall out of an airplane it can be said that quite a bit can actually be done with these cameras and that they probably can last much longer than we think. More after the jump.

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Tips on Shooting Photos For Professional Agencies

Gerard Butler on the set of "The Bounty"

Many photographers dream and aspire to work for the professional agencies. Having a name like Magnum, Getty, Zooma, Associated Press etc. sure means that you’re good and at the top of your game. Most photographers though don’t know what these agencies call for. From my time working for Magnum Photos, Spotlight Press and talking to Brad Elterman of Buzzfoto, I learned quite a bit that shocked and amazed me and even colleagues of mine. Some of those tips after the jump.

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