In the Age of Mirrorless, Do We Really Need APS-C DSLR Cameras?

canon aps-c cameras

The APS-C DSLR could be on the way out in favor of lighter, faster Mirrorless models.

The APS-C DSLR has been a gateway camera for many photographers, and some higher spec’d APS-C DSLR models are still used by professionals and hobbyists alike due to their rugged bodies and good overall performance. But with Canon chosing to kill off their sports and action centered EOS 7D models one has to wonder if APS-C DSLR models are coming to the end of the road. Should APS-C DSLRs still be produced by major manufacturers going forward, or should the switch to APS-C Mirrorless cameras take place across the board? Continue reading…

Review: Canon MR-14EX II Macro Ring Flash

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Canon MR14 II ring flash review product photos (1 of 14)ISO 2001-50 sec at f - 4.0

Earlier this year, Canon introduced their MR-14 EX II ring flash. As the successor to their aging offering, the new flash brought minor upgrades with it including new ergonomics, a new LED lamp to help with focusing, and new controls on the back. But otherwise, it’s a mostly unchanged flash. To begin with, it was very specialized and the world of macro photography has changed quite dramatically as the years have progressed. Many photographers tend to go for diffusion off of large panels instead of direct light from a harsh flash.

And while you should be excited about the ETTL capability improvement that this flash brings, you should also scratch your head a bit about how it fits into Canon’s ecosystem.

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DxOMark’s Sensor Scores State Canon 7D Mk II Looks Antiquated

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Canon 7D Mk II first impressions images (1 of 7)ISO 2001-160 sec at f - 3.2

Today is a sad, sad day for many Canon users. Photo Rumors is reporting that the 7D Mk II’s sensor seems very subpar in comparison to many of the latest DSLRs and APS-C sensors. According to DxOMark the 7D Mk II, which received a modest megapixel bump from the earlier version should have performed amazingly given Canon’s history of innovation. Unfortunately, the sensor here is on par with that of much older cameras. In fact, the sensor from the Nikon D300s outperforms it in some ways.

To put this in perspective, the D300s was one of the first cameras that we reviewed on the site. That was almost five years ago.

More after the jump.

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First Impressions: Canon 7D Mk II

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Canon 7D Mk II first impressions images (1 of 7)ISO 2001-160 sec at f - 3.2

The Canon 7D Mk II has been in development for many years now, and the company’s track record of staying conservative sticks true to this latest product. When the first 7D launched, it made waves in the APS-C world with its super fast FPS rate and its complementary features to the 5D Mk II. Canon’s choices to stick to the safe side and make modest improvements isn’t a bad one per se at all–but we’d be telling complete lies to say that we didn’t expect more.

As far as the feature set goes, Canon has a 20.2MP APS-C sensor at the heart of the camera that also shoots at 10fps, houses dual DIGIC 6 processors, 65 cross type AF points, a 100% viewfinder, a magnesium alloy camera body, dust and weather resistance that is said to be 4x better than the original, GPS integration, a CF and SD card slot, ISO ranges from 100-16,000, a custom movie servo mode and much more.

We took a look at the 7D Mk II earlier last month.

Continue reading…

Canon’s 7D Mk II is Rumored to Have a 24MP or 20MP Sensor

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As we currently know, the Canon 70D has a 20MP APS-C sized sensor. And so some of the rumors that both Photography Bay and Canon Watch are reporting about the Canon 7D Mk II sort of make sense. According to them, the camera will have either a 20MP or 24MP APS-C sensor. The company’s 6D currently has a sensor around the 20MP range and they may try to stick to that so that they don’t out-muscle their 5D Mk III. That holds true to Canon’s philosophy of not trying to cannibalize their own products.

But what they’re all saying so far is that there is a prototype out there with the following specs:

  • ~24MP sensor with Dual Pixel CMOS AF
  • Auto-Focus system similar to the EOS 5D Mark III (61 points), possibly the same as 5D3
  • High frame rate, 10-12 fps
  • “high grade” weather sealing, like Canon’s professional DSLRs
  • Dual Digic V+ processor
  • Single card slot
  • WiFi & GPS
  • Innovative video features
  • Price around $2000
  • Very good ISO performance

Wishful thinking maybe? A single card slot doesn’t really make sense either.