Olivia Pasquarelli Olivia Pasquarelli

All articles by Olivia Pasquarelli

 

Tips from a Makeup Artist to a Photographer About Collaborating

For all us Makeup Artists out there, we can probably think of many things we’d like to say to all the photographers we’ve worked with.  I’m sure all you photographers have a thing or two you’d like to say to us as well. Our paths cross constantly, and our careers require us to work together as a team to create a satisfactory result.  I have a unique perspective on this topic; I’m a photographer that loved makeup turned makeup artist that uses photography to record her work. I’ve used photography as a creative medium since a young age, studied it in college, and was a working photographer for a few years, which included fine art work, music photography, assisting on set, and behind the scenes photography for events and fashion week shows.  Makeup has been a tool of creative expression for me since I was very young, too....
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Gallery Review: Stephen Shore Retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art

A tangerine sunset casts a Texaco station in an eerie light in a middle-of-nowhere highway.  Flashbulbs on a Rollei 35mm capture a grotesquely delicious image of an omelet, white toast, and a stark white glass of milk in what could be any diner in the United States.  For the past five decades, Stephen Shore has captured an unflinching and unapologetic perspective of America.  His work justified the mundane and changed the way the world saw photography.  After his work hit the mainstream, the world suddenly saw that photographs of parking lots and the average citizen were not a waste of film, and they followed suite....
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How to Gain a Subject’s Trust for a Documentary Project

Documentary photography is a collaborative process. You tend to work with people as they go about being themselves. But in order for you to do that, you need one big thing first. While this may seem obvious, a documentary project is only successful when the photographer has earned the trust of their subjects. If you’re passionate about a subject, you should a find a way to submerge yourself in that world. But before you do that, you should ask yourself, “Why do I want to shoot this subject?” Make sure it’s for the right reasons before you even begin. You photograph something because you find it beautiful and fascinating on some level. You find your subject worthy of being photographed. Be sure to treat your subject with that level of respect....
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From the Pit: An Introduction to Photographing Concerts

In my opinion, shooting live music is one of the most challenging photographic experiences possible. For starters, there is very low light, and it’s constantly changing. I’ve shot in venues that are lit by a single bare lightbulb hanging from the ceiling, and venues that have light shows that move beams of colored light in all directions. Your subjects are constantly and unpredictably moving around. You’re surrounded by people that, depending on what genre of music you’re shooting, are dancing, jumping, pushing you and spilling drinks left and right. Depending on your access, you may have a limit amount of time to get the perfect shot.  Most larger venues only give photographers the three first songs to shoot....
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Eight Quick Tips on How to Ask Strangers for Portraits

You may have missed opportunities for incredible street portraits because of fear of taking photos of strangers. I myself have imagined scenarios where my candid subjects yell at me or attack me. Luckily, in my 6 years taking photographs of strangers throughout New York City and in small towns in the tri state area, that has never happened....
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Vagabonds: Following the Final Moments of the NYC Punk Scene

The Vagabonds project happened naturally, starting in 2012 and spanning all the way until 2015. Prior to starting this project, I had already been going to concerts and shooting, but I began becoming more interested in the subcultures of the people attending the shows and the spaces they occupied than the actual performers. I had just moved to a new place, and the passion and dedication some subcultures I discovered in Brooklyn and lower Manhattan fascinated me. I went to more and more shows, having my camera on me at all times ready to shoot anyone who would let me. The people in the photographs became my friends, and the more I took their photos and learned about their lives, the more obsessed I became with shooting more and capturing their unique point of view....
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