Stepping Out of Your Head with Street Photography: The Meditative Process

My name is Tom Souzer and I’m a self taught photographer from Pittsburgh PA . I’ve been shooting the streets of Pittsburgh for about two years now. I tend to focus on emotions, expressions, and fleeting moments. I personally like to not be seen while I’m out shooting (although it does happen from time to time) because I want to capture moments as they happen. I edit mostly in black and white using lightroom then Silver Efex Pro. I shoot with a fuji x pro 1 using either a 18mm or 23mm lens. When people hear that I shoot digital they automatically think that I’m using autofocus but I would say 99% of the time I’m zone focusing.

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I Find Fashion Photography So Boring; But Not Street Photography

For work I shoot commercial and fashion photography and really, it is so fucking boring. So in my own time I just love to photograph humanity. I want to turn the mundane into something beautiful. I think this helps me cope with life, making the ordinary extraordinary. I have a Leica Q and like to take my camera out when I walk my dog every day. At school I wanted to paint photos realistically but I was crap, so I figured I could just take photos instead. I really enjoyed it and got a rush from the results and I just never stopped.

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On How Photography Taught Me to Cherish Moments

All images and text by Michael Lin. Used with permission.

I’m an amateur photo-hobbyist living in Tokyo, Japan. I picked up photography around 3 years ago, thinking I could jump into a new realm of world that I’ve never understood before. Prior to picking up a camera, I was a normal college undergrad who puts studying first before most of my hobbies; however, photography taught me that I should cherish the people and the moments around me and try to remember them especially as a foreigner living in a wonderful place like Japan.

I am unashamedly a man “suffering” from G.A.S., and I shoot with whatever I find interesting within my range of affordability. This came in the forms of Nikon D810 (and D800, D750, Df etc.), Canon 5D Mark III (and IV), Fujifilm X-Pro2 (and X-T1) all the way to Hasselblad 500C/M, Pentacon Six TL, Nikon F3 and many other cameras.

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Jamie Saechao: Striving for Elegance in Wedding Photography

All images by text by Jamie Saechao. Used with permission.

I fell in love with photography while working at a job I absolutely hated! Sometimes you have to find what you don’t love to do in order to discover what your true calling is. I needed a creative outlet and photography allowed me to express myself, connect with others, and feel alive again. I especially loved connecting with other women, celebrating their beauty, and building confidence through portraiture.

I strive to create images that are elegant, timeless, and romantic. I feel most accomplished when I’ve created a portrait that makes someone stop and look a second time… although to be honest I think those images come to you, in the midst of creating. It’s something you have to wait patiently for.

I have also found great joy in documenting nature on film…there is a certain joy in capturing the beauty and simplicity of combining the two!

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Dafni Kemeridou Explores The Truth About Herself in Self Portraits (Slightly NSFW)

All images by Dafni Kemeridou. Used with permission.

Dafni Kemeridou is a young photographer, born in Thessaloniki, Greece, in 1994. She studied photography at I.E.K. AKMI School (2012-2014) and attended photographic workshops given by photographer Dimitris Triantafyllou (2016-2017). In 2015-2016, she gave presentations and held photographic editing sessions for FOAPTH (the photography club of the Aristotelean University of Thessaloniki). She uses photography as a visual tool to explore and question herself and the world. Her photography deals with themes such as time, dreams, and existentialism. She usually prefers the low light of the twilight hours that creates an atmosphere of mystery and emotional depictions within the image. The longer exposures and light manipulations that also exist in most of her images are there to enhance the sense of time and space.

She is currently working as a freelance photographer mainly for wedding, baptism, concert, and event photography. At the same time, she is working on her personal projects that are in progress.

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Stone Zhu: Fantastic Neon Studio Portraiture

All images by Stone Zhu. Used with permission.

My name is Stone Zhu. Growing up in China, my sense of self as well as my aesthetics were deeply informed by traditional culture, values and art. Culturally we are meditative, introspective, modest, and moody. Strong reds, blacks, and whites fill our artwork, architecture, and sculpture. In traditional painting emptiness is highly regarded and the image is often constrained to the edges of the picture.

In contrast, my experience of Western culture has revealed a frenetic, open, and random quality that is foreign to my sensibilities. The body is regarded with sensuality, idealism, and erotic fantasy. My photographic practice has become a blend of these disparate and distinct cultures. The formal qualities of Chinese art are boldly present while, at the same time, I have felt more able to explore my fascination with the body as an object of beauty and desire.

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Ian Forsyth: The Integrity of the Pictures is Paramount

All images and text by Ian Forsyth. Used with permission.

It doesn’t matter if you take quick snaps on an iphone or carry around the latest Nikon or whatever. Taking pictures is what it’s all about but also remember to value your work. If you don’t, who will? I’m not saying it’s all about money but don’t be afraid to charge for your work if making a living is what you’re trying to do. A byline only agreement doesn’t pay a food bill. Retain your copyright! It’s your work so don’t give it away. Respect who you shoot whoever they are and be responsible with your work. At the same time enjoy it! Being a photographer is an amazing thing! It can be expensive, frustrating, annoying at times, sometimes unrewarding and it can be demoralising and takes over all aspects of your life…but it’s still the best job in the world!

I’m a freelance documentary photographer based in Saltburn by the Sea on the north east coast of England. I work mainly as a stringer photographer for Getty Images covering features and news in my area but I also shoot personal projects as well as the occasional corporate commission or local newspaper shift.

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Nei Valente: Street Photography With a Sony RX100 IV

All images and text by Nei Valente. Used with permission.

“Fifth Avenuers” is a visual registry of people and moments from one of the most iconic avenues in the world. It captures the vibrancy created by the mix of people who walk along the street that divides Manhattan into east and west. Some of the most famous museums in New York—like MoMA, the Met, and the Guggenheim—attract art-conscious locals and tourists alike. Others are attracted to Fifth Avenue by its proximity to Central Park and the ostentatious, tall buildings that line the avenue, including the Empire State and Flatiron buildings, Rockefeller Center, and Trump Tower. Those who can afford to, shop along one of the most well-known and high-end shopping streets in the world. Store employees, construction workers, and street vendors are combined, and sometimes contrasted, with the people who work in the tall buildings and walk on the avenue during their commute. To further add to the energy and bustling atmosphere, the street hosts important events like the LGBT Pride March, Puerto Rican Day Parade, and St. Patrick’s Day Parade.

For a couple of months, I walked along Fifth Avenue trying to capture the specific things that encapsulated the vibrancy of the avenue. If you paint a canvas with fifty black dots and add just one red dot, your painting is no longer about the fifty black dots. But it’s also not about the red dot. The painting is about the relationship of the fifty dots that looks the same with that one different red dot. That’s what I had in mind when photographing the avenue during my lunch breaks. I was always imagining the street as a canvas and trying to include in my photos the interactions and people that would be the red dot, representing a specific moment on Fifth Avenue. Because, to accurately represent a place, you can’t photograph only the ordinary people and scenes, but also capture what contrasts with the normality and thus makes that place special enough to be photographed.

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