New Vintage: Older Digital Nikon Cameras That Can Still Do a Job Today

There are some older digital Nikon cameras that can still do a top job today, and the best part is that they can be picked up at affordable prices.

We recently took a look at some old but gold Canon digital cameras, and now it’s time to look at some new modern vintage digital Nikon cameras as well. During the DSLR wars, Nikon went head to head with Canon, and they produced some real gems that will go down as some of the best digital cameras ever produced. If you have been thinking about picking up a DSLR with a few miles on the clock so that you can play around, or use it as a workhorse camera that won’t let you down, click on past the break. There you will see which older digital Nikon cameras can still produce glorious images and which ones would still be great cameras to invest in today.

Captured with the Nikon D810

As we have mentioned before, we’ve noticed a lot of DSLR cameras are starting to be purchased more frequently. While that may not be the case for all digital Nikon cameras, there are certainly some that many photographers will gravitate towards over newer Mirrorless cameras. Just because these cameras have been around a while doesn’t mean that they aren’t capable of producing stunning results in the right hands. If you want to pick up some of the best digital Nikon cameras at reasonable prices (well, apart from one of them), then these are the models we suggest for a closer look.

Nikon D5500

digital nikon cameras

Through the years, the Nikon D5500 has given many photographers their first taste of DSLR life. While this camera is aimed squarely at consumers, it is more than capable of producing gorgeous images thanks to its solid 24.2MP sensor. Add in features like built-in Wi-Fi, a 5fps burst rate, and a fast AF system, and you can see why the D5500 was so popular. Here are the pros and cons from our full review:

Pros

  • Great image quality
  • Fast focusing abilities
  • 5FPS shooting
  • Pretty quiet shutter
  • Small size
  • Such a great grip that we never even bothered to use a camera strap

Cons

  • It’s not doing anything new for the market segment

Buy now renewed: $387

Buy now new: From $659 with two lenses

Nikon D7100

The D7100 was Nikon’s flagship APS-C camera back in 2013, and it went head-to-head with the Canon 70D. DSLR technology was really starting to heat up, and the D7100 packed some impressive specs. The lack of a no-pass filter gave it the edge over the Canon 70D when it came to image sharpness, and it’s fast burst rates, great ergonomics and build quality made it stand out in the prosumer category. If you pick one up today, you will still be impressed with what this camera can do. Here are the pros and cons from our full review:

Pros

  • Excellent image quality across the board
  • Fast-focusing in many situations
  • Timelapse mode is awesome
  • Ergonomics are very intuitive
  • Build quality is stellar
  • Super sharp images due to no low pass filter

Cons

  • No aperture control in video

Buy used: From $357.75

Buy new: $728

Nikon D500

digital nikon cameras

The Nikon D500 is one of the best APS-C cameras of all time; heck it is one of the best cameras of all time. Nikon hit a home run with the Nikon D500. The camera’s rugged build, exceptional high ISO performance, 10fps burst rates, built-in Wi-Fi, and a touchscreen made this camera a must-have for professional sports and wildlife photographers. Launched in 2015, the Nikon D500 showed that APS-C cameras have a place in the world of professional photography. Despite newer Mirrorless cameras on the market that are designed for sports, the D500 continues to be the camera of choice for many in the field. Here are the pros and cons from our full review:

Pros

  • Fast, accurate autofocus
  • A dedicated thumb joystick on the back for changing AF points
  • The new touchscreen is an interesting and welcome addition
  • Integration of Wifi is welcome
  • Top-notch build quality
  • Battery life that refuses to die
  • Such a good camera that we honestly think it’s overkill for a lot of people

Cons

  • Pretty big and tough to get into some messenger bags

Buy now: $1,496.95

Captured with the Nikon Df

Pro Tip: The digital Nikon cameras listed here were built to be used and abused, and their workhorse-like nature means they will be around for a while, but in order to maximize their lifespan, you need to take care of them. Simple maintenance can make your camera last years longer. Make sure you clean the contacts and the sensor and eliminate dust as often as possible. Do these things and you’ll find that these digital Nikon cameras will just keep going. You don’t need to spend a fortune on a cleaning kit either; this one will do just fine.

Nikon D600

Nikon’s answer to Canon’s affordable, entry-level Full-Frame EOS 6D was the Nikon D600. This bare bones (in terms of features) camera gave many photographers an affordable way to move from APS-C to Full Frame bodies. Like the Canon 6D, the Nikon D600 was and still is capable of producing spectacular images thanks to its 24.7MP sensor. We were impressed with how the camera performed and how well it handled during our time with it. Here are the pros and cons from our full review:

Pros

  • Lightweight, but still feels solid in the hand
  • Good autofocusing speeds in most situations
  • Pretty great high ISO performance
  • Everything about the image quality is top shelf
  • Two cards slots

Cons

  • Focus mode selector is in a slightly odd position
  • Some slight hunting in low light scenarios
  • The 39 AF points are grouped too close together

Buy used: From $440

Nikon D750

digital nikon cameras

The Nikon D750 has achieved legendary status, and for good reasons. This camera ushered in a new era for Nikon, and the D750 set the standard of what a pro-level camera for the masses should be. The D750 is still raved about today, and honestly, there aren’t many newer cameras today that can outdo the D750. The image quality from this camera is superb, the colors are gorgeous, the high ISO performance is incredible, and the AF system is tremendous. Sure, there’s no eye AF or advanced autofocus modes, but this camera just works. Portrait photographers swear by this camera, and many refuse to let it go. Here are the pros and cons from our full review:

Pros

  • Deep grip
  • The intuitive and well laid out control scheme
  • Renders amazing detail and color
  • Clean files at ISO 6400
  • Usable images up to ISO 10000
  • Built-in Wi-Fi transmission
  • Tilting screen

Cons

  • Plastic front plate

Buy now: $1,496.95

Nikon D810

digital nikon cameras

When it comes to digital Nikon cameras their D8XX cameras have always represented the very best that Nikon has made outside of their pro-body DX (D4, D5, D6, etc.) series, and the D810 is just one of a few D8XX cameras that really stood out. The D850 was the successor to this camera, but if you’re looking for a higher megapixel camera at a more affordable price, the Nikon D810 could be for you. Packing a 36.8MP sensor, great AF focusing capabilities, superb image quality, and some of the best high ISO performance you’ll come across, the D810 is still perfect for landscape photographers who want to capture immense detail and for low light shooters. Here are the pros and cons from our full review:

Pros

  • Absolutely, positively amazing high ISO performance
  • Great color output
  • Some of the most versatile RAW files we’ve ever seen
  • Fast autofocus in great lighting even with third party lenses
  • Build very solidly yet isn’t too heavy
  • The small RAW mode can be a lifesaver when you don’t have high capacity cards
  • Same simplistic Nikon menu system
  • Quiet shooting mode makes this one of the most stealthy DSLRs we’ve tested. But the shutter is already much quieter than previous Nikon DSLRs

Cons

  • Price point (at the time)
  • Autofocus in extreme low light situations (we’re talking about candlelit events) is inconsistent and requires lots of thought to carefully place a focusing point on a high contrast spot
  • A tilting LCD screen when shooting timelapse videos would have been really, really useful
  • AF assist lamp is in a weird spot that doesn’t always help enough

Buy now: $1,146.17

Nikon Df

digital nikon cameras

The Nikon Df is a true modern vintage camera. When Nikon released this camera, they made it clear that this was a camera for photographers, in fact, it was marketed as a ‘pure photography’ camera. Nikon completely removed all video modes and designed the camera to look like their bodies of yesteryear. This Full-Frame camera packed a 16.2MP sensor (the same one found in the D4), 39 AF points, 3D tracking, and burst rate of 5.5fps. The vintage design of the camera is nice to look at, but it did complicated usage a little bit. Still, even with the negatives, this camera sang a glorious song when it came to image quality. We said the images were stunning, and we stand by that. If you want one of the digital Nikon cameras that will surely turn heads, pick up a Nikon Df, just be prepared to pay for it. Here are the pros and cons from our full review:

Pros

  • The Nikon Df works with the all current Nikon lenses back to the non-Ai ones
  • The D4’s Sensor is amazing and gives usable images up to ISO 12,800
  • The image quality of the Nikon Df is stunning.
  • The raw file sizes are smaller than the D800, yet retain a lot of versatility
  • The camera is a decent size
  • The shutter is not too loud.

Cons

  • The Nikon Df does not feel like $2,700 worth of camera
  • The Nikon Df has the same autofocusing system as the D610.
  • There is only room for one SD card.
  • The Shutter speed only goes up to 1/4000 of a second
  • The top dials seem like overkill, more retro chique than useful functionality
  • The body seems like it has too much plastic
  • The battery cover comes off too easily
  • The HDR function only works in JPEG mode, not when saving raw + JPEG

Buy now: $2,746.95