Review: Interfit 65″ White Parabolic Umbrella

Umbrellas are by far my favorite lighting modifiers due to the variety of looks they can deliver–and the latest from Interfit is surely no exception to the rule. Their 65″ Parabolic White Umbrella is great for working with portrait subjects but it’s also quite solid when it comes to build quality and overall versatility. Of course, this isn’t a true adjustable parabolic but it can deliver that look. This just makes sense though as Interfit has been trying to take higher end concepts and make them more affordable to the semi-professional photographer for a while. So in truth, I wasn’t sure what to expect but what I got was quite a surprise.

Gear Used

The Interfit 65″ Parabolic umbrella was tested with the Adorama Flashpoint Xplor 600, the Canon 6D, and Sigma 35mm f1.4 Art lens.

Tech Specs

Specs taken from the page listing

Color Shoot-Through Translucent
Open Face Diameter 165cm (65″)
Fabric Material translucent nylon
Weight 0.2kg (0.4lb)

Ergonomics

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Interfit 65%22 White Parabolic Umbrella product images (2 of 4)ISO 4001-100 sec at f - 4.0

When you get the Interfit umbrella, it comes in a well made (significantly better made than anything Westcott has put out) case. It’s solid, and has a strap to go around your shoulder when transporting the umbrella.

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Interfit 65%22 White Parabolic Umbrella product images (3 of 4)ISO 4001-100 sec at f - 4.0

Take it out of its case, and you’ll find a standard umbrella, except that everything feels very well made. It’s almost as if I was touching and holding a Profoto product.

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Interfit 65%22 White Parabolic Umbrella product images (4 of 4)ISO 4001-100 sec at f - 4.0

Open up the insides, and what you’ll find is a very clean white surface that has a very smooth texture to it overall. Westcott’s in comparison feels a bit textured and delivers more specular light. However, their umbrellas also don’t pitch forward as much as Interfit’s.

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Interfit Parabolic umbrella review images (4 of 7)ISO 4001-100 sec at f - 2.8

When it opens up, it’s very large and sturdy. Everything comes together with a great feeling snap, even details as small as the locking mechanism for the umbrella to keep it open.

Build Quality

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I was quite surprised by how well it’s designed and built. Most umbrellas I handle feel cheap to mediocre unless they’re from Broncolor, Elinchom, or Profoto. But on the other hand, Interfit’s option didn’t have me believing exactly what I was holding. The stitching, materials, and even the umbrella’s ribs all feel very solid.

I wouldn’t shoot with it in a strong wind, but I know that it can take a little bit of a tumble just in case. I’ve even experienced umbrellas breaking on set and monolights falling on my head. I’d be able to work in confidence with the Interfit, though I’d obviously also still recommend using sandbags for the best stability.

Image Quality

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Interfit Parabolic umbrella review images (1 of 7)ISO 4001-100 sec at f - 2.8

The Parabolic’s greatest strength is its wraparound ability while also being more efficient with light use due to its design. It helps to deliver just the right mood you’re looking for while also creating enough spill to deliver a gorgeous look.

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Interfit Parabolic umbrella review images (6 of 7)ISO 4001-100 sec at f - 2.8

The umbrella has a white interior, and so it’s great for working with people. Silver interiors usually bring out too many elements on skin and make your images too sharp overall. But the white is just perfect here.

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Interfit Parabolic umbrella review images (7 of 7)ISO 4001-100 sec at f - 2.8

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Interfit Parabolic umbrella review images (2 of 7)ISO 4001-100 sec at f - 2.8

Conclusions

It’s arguable that any umbrella can create every lighting look. But what really counts with photographers is reliability, build quality, and portability. I’d be very confident taking this umbrella on the subway and perhaps even shooting with it down by a waterfront for a while. It delivers beautiful, smooth lighting; but the read deal maker here is its build quality.

And for $119, you really can’t go wrong.