Jordan Stead’s Telling Portraits of Seattle PI’s K-9 Units

All images by Jordan Stead. Used with permission.

Photographer Jordan Stead cites that the art of the pitch helped him to do a portrait project on the Seattle PI’s police dogs. It’s an art that many professionals and semi-professionals understand–and one that is backed by a creative vision. Luckily, Jordan loves giving back to the visual community through eduation.

He started out in video; but later on stills went on to pay the bills after becoming obsessed with photography. He’s a photojournalist and has witnessed life, death, Super Bowls & nudist culture through his career. He’s worked with clients such as Microsoft, Amazon, The New York Times, Chevron & CreativeLive.

When you look at it like that, photographing police dogs may seem like a piece of cake.

Since the Middle Ages, dogs have long since been used for law enforcement. Spread among their human counterparts, more than a dozen specialized canines hold a place within the ranks of the Seattle Police Department to protect and serve alongside their handling officers. Meet the dogs here, in a series of portraits. (NOTE: minor retouching was used to omit copious amounts of saliva and toenail tears from the photoshoot backdrop.) ----- Tracking Police Dog Cerberus, age three, currently serves with the Seattle Police Department. In his first field case after K-9 Academy, Cerberus chased a fleeing shooting suspect following a Washington State Patrol pursuit. Cerberus followed the perpetrator up a muddy, 60 degree, 300-foot hill, covered in sticker bushes to locate the armed suspect who was detained after more than an hour of navigating that difficult terrain. It has been said that Cerberus sings along to the "O'Reilly Auto Parts" song every time it comes on the radio. Photographed Monday, May 11, 2015, in Seattle, Washington. (Jordan Stead, seattlepi.com)

Since the Middle Ages, dogs have long since been used for law enforcement. Spread among their human counterparts, more than a dozen specialized canines hold a place within the ranks of the Seattle Police Department to protect and serve alongside their handling officers. Meet the dogs here, in a series of portraits. (NOTE: minor retouching was used to omit copious amounts of saliva and toenail tears from the photoshoot backdrop.)
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Tracking Police Dog Cerberus, age three, currently serves with the Seattle Police Department. In his first field case after K-9 Academy, Cerberus chased a fleeing shooting suspect following a Washington State Patrol pursuit. Cerberus followed the perpetrator up a muddy, 60 degree, 300-foot hill, covered in sticker bushes to locate the armed suspect who was detained after more than an hour of navigating that difficult terrain. It has been said that Cerberus sings along to the “O’Reilly Auto Parts” song every time it comes on the radio. Photographed Monday, May 11, 2015, in Seattle, Washington. (Jordan Stead, seattlepi.com)

Phoblographer: Talk to us about how you got into photography.

Jordan: I started as a video guy, pre-college, shooting shorts and music videos out a closet- turned-classroom at Ballard High School in Seattle, Washington. Stills had always been a recreational venture for me. As soon as I got to college, I became quickly enamored by the power of the photograph through my studies in Visual Journalism at Western Washington University. I was a man obsessed, and embarked on this madness of living the photographic life through internships, workshops, friendships and unlikely opportunities.

Tracking Police Dog Cerberus, age three, currently serves with the Seattle Police Department. In his first field case after K-9 Academy, Cerberus chased a fleeing shooting suspect following a Washington State Patrol pursuit. Cerberus followed the perpetrator up a muddy, 60 degree, 300-foot hill, covered in sticker bushes to locate the armed suspect who was detained after more than an hour of navigating that difficult terrain. It has been said that Cerberus sings along to the "O'Reilly Auto Parts" song every time it comes on the radio. Photographed Monday, May 11, 2015, in Seattle, Washington. (Jordan Stead, seattlepi.com)

Tracking Police Dog Cerberus, age three, currently serves with the Seattle Police Department. In his first field case after K-9 Academy, Cerberus chased a fleeing shooting suspect following a Washington State Patrol pursuit. Cerberus followed the perpetrator up a muddy, 60 degree, 300-foot hill, covered in sticker bushes to locate the armed suspect who was detained after more than an hour of navigating that difficult terrain. It has been said that Cerberus sings along to the “O’Reilly Auto Parts” song every time it comes on the radio. Photographed Monday, May 11, 2015, in Seattle, Washington. (Jordan Stead, seattlepi.com)

Phoblographer: What made you want to get into portraiture?

Jordan: I didn’t, per say. Photojournalism – or whatever it’s called these days – is a “jack of all trades” profession. You have to be proficient at everything. The demands are unparalleled, I think, in the photographic world. Portraiture is just a small piece of the puzzle.

Phoblographer: Where did the idea come from to photograph the Seattle PI dogs?

Narcotics Detection Police Dog Zoe, age 7, has served with the Seattle Police Department for six years. Over the years, Zoe located numerous hidden compartments in vehicles, resulting in the seizures of narcotics and currency. Photographed Monday, May 11, 2015, in Seattle, Washington. (Jordan Stead, seattlepi.com)

Narcotics Detection Police Dog Zoe, age 7, has served with the Seattle Police Department for six years. Over the years, Zoe located numerous hidden compartments in vehicles, resulting in the seizures of narcotics and currency. Photographed Monday, May 11, 2015, in Seattle, Washington. (Jordan Stead, seattlepi.com)

Jordan: I want to make happy pictures as often as I can. So much of “news” and “feature” photography is sad, or dealing with depressed subject matter. The Seattle Police dogs offered a uniquely fun, upbeat and universally interesting subject to make pictures of.

“Photojournalism – or whatever it’s called these days – is a “jack of all trades” profession. You have to be proficient at everything.”

Phoblographer: What was it like working with them? Of course, you needed their handler around, right?

Jordan: I was a staff photographer at SeattlePI.com at that time, and simply reached out to the proper individual at the Seattle Police Department. Looking back, I’m surprised they responded – but that’s why the art of the pitch is so important. Rather than say “I want to make cute pictures of police dogs,” I stated my interest in using visual storytelling to shed light on the often-misunderstood role of K-9s in a police force. To dig deeper and come away with interesting photographs backed by informative, accompanying stories about each animal.

Narcotics Detection Police Dog Zoe, age 7, has served with the Seattle Police Department for six years. Over the years, Zoe located numerous hidden compartments in vehicles, resulting in the seizures of narcotics and currency. Photographed Monday, May 11, 2015, in Seattle, Washington. (Jordan Stead, seattlepi.com)

Narcotics Detection Police Dog Zoe, age 7, has served with the Seattle Police Department for six years. Over the years, Zoe located numerous hidden compartments in vehicles, resulting in the seizures of narcotics and currency. Photographed Monday, May 11, 2015, in Seattle, Washington. (Jordan Stead, seattlepi.com)

The SPD was nice enough to grant me the use of a large room in their precinct for the better part of 12 hours. I organized all of the dogs (and their respective officers) to come in on 45-minute shifts, and to bring an item relevant to their canine track record. While photographing each dog – a process within itself – I would casually interview the officers about their animal’s progress in the force, and, if possible, the K-9’s career-defining moment.

Aside from the stress of watching dogs rip around the backdrop and lighting setup, the process was strangely smooth. Do note: seamless paper is no match for slobbery jowls and dog toenails.

“Looking back, I’m surprised they responded – but that’s why the art of the pitch is so important. Rather than say “I want to make cute pictures of police dogs,” I stated my interest in using visual storytelling to shed light on the often-misunderstood role of K-9s in a police force.”

Phoblographer: Each dog seems to have their own unique and distinct personality in the photos that you’ve captured. But why the specific creative vision and ideas to use props with some and just have others be plain and against a white background?

Tracking Police Dog Kosmo, age six, serves with the Seattle Police Department. K-9 Officer J. Moyer, described meeting his dog: "Kosmo stood up and placed one paw on each of my shoulders. When I went to say hello, [Kosmo] put his tongue in my mouth and licked my face. I figured that was his way of telling me he was actually the one doing the choosing." Two days after Kosmo completed the basic K9 training academy, he was asked to track a violent DV suspect that had jumped from the window of a second story building to escape. Kosmo tracked through yards and over fences to an old dirty mattress that was pressed flat against a retaining wall. Knowing that no one could hide between a mattress and a wall unless they were as thin as a sheet of paper, his handler explained to his dog no one could be there and the track was ended and officers left the area. Ten minutes later the suspect returned to the original crime scene and fled a second time. Kosmo again tracked through yards to the mattress. To prove to Kosmo no one could be there, his hander pulled the mattress away from the cement retaining wall to reveal the suspect tucked into a large hole broken into the wall. The suspect was pulling the mattress toward him to conceal himself within the hole. Photographed Monday, May 11, 2015, in Seattle, Washington. (Jordan Stead, seattlepi.com)

Tracking Police Dog Kosmo, age six, serves with the Seattle Police Department. K-9 Officer J. Moyer, described meeting his dog: “Kosmo stood up and placed one paw on each of my shoulders. When I went to say hello, [Kosmo] put his tongue in my mouth and licked my face. I figured that was his way of telling me he was actually the one doing the choosing.” Two days after Kosmo completed the basic K9 training academy, he was asked to track a violent DV suspect that had jumped from the window of a second story building to escape. Kosmo tracked through yards and over fences to an old dirty mattress that was pressed flat against a retaining wall. Knowing that no one could hide between a mattress and a wall unless they were as thin as a sheet of paper, his handler explained to his dog no one could be there and the track was ended and officers left the area. Ten minutes later the suspect returned to the original crime scene and fled a second time. Kosmo again tracked through yards to the mattress. To prove to Kosmo no one could be there, his hander pulled the mattress away from the cement retaining wall to reveal the suspect tucked into a large hole broken into the wall. The suspect was pulling the mattress toward him to conceal himself within the hole. Photographed Monday, May 11, 2015, in Seattle, Washington. (Jordan Stead, seattlepi.com)

Jordan: I knew the final gallery on SeattlePI.com would be a linear experience, and I wanted each dog to get two pictures each. One image, the first you’d see, would be what you’d expect: a full body portrait of the animal in their tactical gear. The second image, usually shot much tighter, would serve the purpose of omitting the “police- ness” of the animal, showing something personal about them (such as Police Dog Orka’s metal-capped teeth). Occasionally, a prop would be thrown in for the sake of variation. Overall, I wanted the images to feel like school pictures – or maybe mug shots, given the subject matter…

Phoblographer: Most dog portrait projects are seemingly just of someone’s pets; but these photos all tell stories. Why did you feel it was important to tell the stories of these dogs?

Jordan: Cute animal pictures are great and all, but this project had to have a news angle, given my employer at the time. Police dogs get a bad rap, and I knew there was more going on behind the scenes. After hearing about many of the dogs’ biggest busts, it was clear that they are an integral, positive part of law enforcement efforts. I love dogs, a good challenge and timeless work that can stand on its own, regardless of when the photographs are viewed. Since initial publication in the PI, the project was picked up on ViewFind, Mashable and Buzzfeed. Best part? The Seattle Police Department loved the results. Amidst other jobs these days (I’m a freelancer now, based out of Seattle, WA), I’ve been working to get clearance from other police department K-9 units to continue the project.

Phoblographer: Talk to us about the gear that you used and the process of photographing the dogs. What were the most difficult parts?

Jordan: The whole shoot was in one location, on one roll of white seamless. Three AlienBee strobes (two bare, one affixed with a bounce umbrella) lit the scene. I shot with one body, a Canon 1D X, and two lenses, a 24-70mm and 135mm prime, for the duration of the project. Basic post-work was done in Adobe Camera Raw.

Tracking Police Dog Kosmo, age six, serves with the Seattle Police Department. K-9 Officer J. Moyer, described meeting his dog: "Kosmo stood up and placed one paw on each of my shoulders. When I went to say hello, [Kosmo] put his tongue in my mouth and licked my face. I figured that was his way of telling me he was actually the one doing the choosing." Two days after Kosmo completed the basic K9 training academy, he was asked to track a violent DV suspect that had jumped from the window of a second story building to escape. Kosmo tracked through yards and over fences to an old dirty mattress that was pressed flat against a retaining wall. Knowing that no one could hide between a mattress and a wall unless they were as thin as a sheet of paper, his handler explained to his dog no one could be there and the track was ended and officers left the area. Ten minutes later the suspect returned to the original crime scene and fled a second time. Kosmo again tracked through yards to the mattress. To prove to Kosmo no one could be there, his hander pulled the mattress away from the cement retaining wall to reveal the suspect tucked into a large hole broken into the wall. The suspect was pulling the mattress toward him to conceal himself within the hole. Photographed Monday, May 11, 2015, in Seattle, Washington. (Jordan Stead, seattlepi.com)

Tracking Police Dog Kosmo, age six, serves with the Seattle Police Department. K-9 Officer J. Moyer, described meeting his dog: “Kosmo stood up and placed one paw on each of my shoulders. When I went to say hello, [Kosmo] put his tongue in my mouth and licked my face. I figured that was his way of telling me he was actually the one doing the choosing.” Two days after Kosmo completed the basic K9 training academy, he was asked to track a violent DV suspect that had jumped from the window of a second story building to escape. Kosmo tracked through yards and over fences to an old dirty mattress that was pressed flat against a retaining wall. Knowing that no one could hide between a mattress and a wall unless they were as thin as a sheet of paper, his handler explained to his dog no one could be there and the track was ended and officers left the area. Ten minutes later the suspect returned to the original crime scene and fled a second time. Kosmo again tracked through yards to the mattress. To prove to Kosmo no one could be there, his hander pulled the mattress away from the cement retaining wall to reveal the suspect tucked into a large hole broken into the wall. The suspect was pulling the mattress toward him to conceal himself within the hole. Photographed Monday, May 11, 2015, in Seattle, Washington. (Jordan Stead, seattlepi.com)

The greatest challenge was not in the photographs, but in the planning. Organizing all those officers (and their dogs) to show up on such a tight shooting schedule was a task – but they took it like champs. I had full control on shoot day. Every officer came prepared with the right gear, effective props and a solid story for each dog.

Phoblographer: What was the editing and culling process like for you? What specific thoughts were going through your head as you edited the photos down to what you’d show?

Jordan: I would shoot as liberally as possible while on set, knowing I had limited time (and patience) from each dog. The selection process was pre-planned (see above, in regards to the first picture / second picture gallery idea). I knew all along that the final product would showcase each dog with two separate pictures.

Tracking Police Dog Ziva, age seven and half, has served four and a half years with the Seattle Police Department. Ziva shares the ranks with her brother, K-9 Jaeger. Among other cases, Ziva tracked down a jewelry thief who looted a Queen Anne shop just days before Christmas. The goods were returned, and the small, local business was unaffected by the robbery during the busiest selling season of the 2013. To this day, customers at the shop can check out a picture of Officer Mark Wong and dog Ziva on the door of the business, thanking them for their hard work. Photographed Monday, May 11, 2015, in Seattle, Washington. (Jordan Stead, seattlepi.com)

Tracking Police Dog Ziva, age seven and half, has served four and a half years with the Seattle Police Department. Ziva shares the ranks with her brother, K-9 Jaeger. Among other cases, Ziva tracked down a jewelry thief who looted a Queen Anne shop just days before Christmas. The goods were returned, and the small, local business was unaffected by the robbery during the busiest selling season of the 2013. To this day, customers at the shop can check out a picture of Officer Mark Wong and dog Ziva on the door of the business, thanking them for their hard work. Photographed Monday, May 11, 2015, in Seattle, Washington. (Jordan Stead, seattlepi.com)

Tracking Police Dog Ziva, age seven and half, has served four and a half years with the Seattle Police Department. Ziva shares the ranks with her brother, K-9 Jaeger. Among other cases, Ziva tracked down a jewelry thief who looted a Queen Anne shop just days before Christmas. The goods were returned, and the small, local business was unaffected by the robbery during the busiest selling season of the 2013. To this day, customers at the shop can check out a picture of Officer Mark Wong and dog Ziva on the door of the business, thanking them for their hard work. Photographed Monday, May 11, 2015, in Seattle, Washington. (Jordan Stead, seattlepi.com)

Tracking Police Dog Ziva, age seven and half, has served four and a half years with the Seattle Police Department. Ziva shares the ranks with her brother, K-9 Jaeger. Among other cases, Ziva tracked down a jewelry thief who looted a Queen Anne shop just days before Christmas. The goods were returned, and the small, local business was unaffected by the robbery during the busiest selling season of the 2013. To this day, customers at the shop can check out a picture of Officer Mark Wong and dog Ziva on the door of the business, thanking them for their hard work. Photographed Monday, May 11, 2015, in Seattle, Washington. (Jordan Stead, seattlepi.com)

Tracking Police Dog Magnum, age 8, tracked down a child rapist who fled through a house. After clearing the building and overgrown yard, Magnum established a track and located the suspect several blocks away. The suspect had fled to an isolated dead end street and was surprised when he was approached by officers and a police dog. Photographed Monday, May 11, 2015, in Seattle, Washington. (Jordan Stead, seattlepi.com)

Tracking Police Dog Magnum, age 8, tracked down a child rapist who fled through a house. After clearing the building and overgrown yard, Magnum established a track and located the suspect several blocks away. The suspect had fled to an isolated dead end street and was surprised when he was approached by officers and a police dog. Photographed Monday, May 11, 2015, in Seattle, Washington. (Jordan Stead, seattlepi.com)

Tracking Police Dog Magnum, age 8, tracked down a child rapist who fled through a house. After clearing the building and overgrown yard, Magnum established a track and located the suspect several blocks away. The suspect had fled to an isolated dead end street and was surprised when he was approached by officers and a police dog. Photographed Monday, May 11, 2015, in Seattle, Washington. (Jordan Stead, seattlepi.com)

Tracking Police Dog Magnum, age 8, tracked down a child rapist who fled through a house. After clearing the building and overgrown yard, Magnum established a track and located the suspect several blocks away. The suspect had fled to an isolated dead end street and was surprised when he was approached by officers and a police dog. Photographed Monday, May 11, 2015, in Seattle, Washington. (Jordan Stead, seattlepi.com)

Tracking Police Dog Koa, age three, has only been in K-9 Academy training for three months. No awards or big cases yet, but Officer TJ San Miguel reminds you to "check back with us soon." Photographed Monday, May 11, 2015, in Seattle, Washington. (Jordan Stead, seattlepi.com)

Tracking Police Dog Koa, age three, has only been in K-9 Academy training for three months. No awards or big cases yet, but Officer TJ San Miguel reminds you to “check back with us soon.” Photographed Monday, May 11, 2015, in Seattle, Washington. (Jordan Stead, seattlepi.com)

Tracking Police Dog Koa, age three, has only been in K-9 Academy training for three months. No awards or big cases yet, but Officer TJ San Miguel reminds you to "check back with us soon." Photographed Monday, May 11, 2015, in Seattle, Washington. (Jordan Stead, seattlepi.com)

Tracking Police Dog Koa, age three, has only been in K-9 Academy training for three months. No awards or big cases yet, but Officer TJ San Miguel reminds you to “check back with us soon.” Photographed Monday, May 11, 2015, in Seattle, Washington. (Jordan Stead, seattlepi.com)

Explosive Detection Police Dog Boomer, age 5, has served three years on the Seattle Police Department's Arson/Bomb Squad. SPD was able to recruit Boomer from an animal shelter and send him to Boeing’s rigorous 440 hour K-9 explosive detection training program. Photographed Monday, May 11, 2015, in Seattle, Washington. (Jordan Stead, seattlepi.com)

Explosive Detection Police Dog Boomer, age 5, has served three years on the Seattle Police Department’s Arson/Bomb Squad. SPD was able to recruit Boomer from an animal shelter and send him to Boeing’s rigorous 440 hour K-9 explosive detection training program. Photographed Monday, May 11, 2015, in Seattle, Washington. (Jordan Stead, seattlepi.com)

Police Dog Boomer has served three years on the Seattle Police Department's Arson/Bomb Squad. SPD was able to recruit Boomer from an animal shelter and send him to Boeing’s rigorous 440 hour K-9 explosive detection training program. Photographed Monday, May 11, 2015, in Seattle, Washington. (Jordan Stead, seattlepi.com)

Police Dog Boomer has served three years on the Seattle Police Department’s Arson/Bomb Squad. SPD was able to recruit Boomer from an animal shelter and send him to Boeing’s rigorous 440 hour K-9 explosive detection training program. Photographed Monday, May 11, 2015, in Seattle, Washington. (Jordan Stead, seattlepi.com)

Buddies and K-9 coworkers Ziva, right, and Dennis, left, have long shared a bond, frequently making public appearances together. Photographed Monday, May 11, 2015, in Seattle, Washington. (Jordan Stead, seattlepi.com)

Buddies and K-9 coworkers Ziva, right, and Dennis, left, have long shared a bond, frequently making public appearances together. Photographed Monday, May 11, 2015, in Seattle, Washington. (Jordan Stead, seattlepi.com)

Tracking Police Dog Orka, age eight, has served seven years with the Seattle Police Department. Orka once tracked a North Precinct burglar over eight blocks of rough terrain. The suspect was caught and later convicted for 62 separate burglaries. Police Dog Orka has false canine teeth due to the wear and tear that his real canines took from his extremely bad habit of gnawing on his kennel. Photographed Monday, May 11, 2015, in Seattle, Washington. (Jordan Stead, seattlepi.com)

Tracking Police Dog Orka, age eight, has served seven years with the Seattle Police Department. Orka once tracked a North Precinct burglar over eight blocks of rough terrain. The suspect was caught and later convicted for 62 separate burglaries. Police Dog Orka has false canine teeth due to the wear and tear that his real canines took from his extremely bad habit of gnawing on his kennel. Photographed Monday, May 11, 2015, in Seattle, Washington. (Jordan Stead, seattlepi.com)

Tracking Police Dog Orka, age eight, has served seven years with the Seattle Police Department. Orka once tracked a North Precinct burglar over eight blocks of rough terrain. The suspect was caught and later convicted for 62 separate burglaries. Police Dog Orka has false canine teeth due to the wear and tear that his real canines took from his extremely bad habit of gnawing on his kennel. Photographed Monday, May 11, 2015, in Seattle, Washington. (Jordan Stead, seattlepi.com)

Tracking Police Dog Orka, age eight, has served seven years with the Seattle Police Department. Orka once tracked a North Precinct burglar over eight blocks of rough terrain. The suspect was caught and later convicted for 62 separate burglaries. Police Dog Orka has false canine teeth due to the wear and tear that his real canines took from his extremely bad habit of gnawing on his kennel. Photographed Monday, May 11, 2015, in Seattle, Washington. (Jordan Stead, seattlepi.com)

Tracking Police Dog Ruger, age 8, may not have had any notable cases yet, but he can open car doors with his muzzle. Photographed Monday, May 11, 2015, in Seattle, Washington. (Jordan Stead, seattlepi.com)

Tracking Police Dog Ruger, age 8, may not have had any notable cases yet, but he can open car doors with his muzzle. Photographed Monday, May 11, 2015, in Seattle, Washington. (Jordan Stead, seattlepi.com)

Tracking Police Dog Ruger, age 8, may not have had any notable cases yet, but he can open car doors with his muzzle. Photographed Monday, May 11, 2015, in Seattle, Washington. (Jordan Stead, seattlepi.com)

Tracking Police Dog Ruger, age 8, may not have had any notable cases yet, but he can open car doors with his muzzle. Photographed Monday, May 11, 2015, in Seattle, Washington. (Jordan Stead, seattlepi.com)

Tracking Police Dog Ziva, right, shares her duties on the force with her brother, Jaeger, left, on the Seattle Police Department's K-9 team. Photographed Monday, May 11, 2015, in Seattle, Washington. (Jordan Stead, seattlepi.com)

Tracking Police Dog Ziva, right, shares her duties on the force with her brother, Jaeger, left, on the Seattle Police Department’s K-9 team. Photographed Monday, May 11, 2015, in Seattle, Washington. (Jordan Stead, seattlepi.com)

Tracking Police Dog Buddy, age 3 and half, has served two years with the Seattle Police Department. When a carjacking occurred in Seattle's north end by two suspects who were said to have a gun, Buddy tracked the pair down in the backyard of a residence. They quickly gave up when Buddy discovered their location. Photographed Monday, May 11, 2015, in Seattle, Washington. (Jordan Stead, seattlepi.com)

Tracking Police Dog Buddy, age 3 and half, has served two years with the Seattle Police Department. When a carjacking occurred in Seattle’s north end by two suspects who were said to have a gun, Buddy tracked the pair down in the backyard of a residence. They quickly gave up when Buddy discovered their location. Photographed Monday, May 11, 2015, in Seattle, Washington. (Jordan Stead, seattlepi.com)

Tracking Police Dog Buddy, age 3 and half, has served two years with the Seattle Police Department. When a carjacking occurred in Seattle's north end by two suspects who were said to have a gun, Buddy tracked the pair down in the backyard of a residence. They quickly gave up when Buddy discovered their location. Photographed Monday, May 11, 2015, in Seattle, Washington. (Jordan Stead, seattlepi.com)

Tracking Police Dog Buddy, age 3 and half, has served two years with the Seattle Police Department. When a carjacking occurred in Seattle’s north end by two suspects who were said to have a gun, Buddy tracked the pair down in the backyard of a residence. They quickly gave up when Buddy discovered their location. Photographed Monday, May 11, 2015, in Seattle, Washington. (Jordan Stead, seattlepi.com)

Tracking Police Dog Jaeger, age 7, has served with the Seattle Police Department for five years. A few months into his career, Jaeger located a burglary suspect and detained the perpetrator by sitting on him. Photographed Monday, May 11, 2015, in Seattle, Washington. (Jordan Stead, seattlepi.com)

Tracking Police Dog Jaeger, age 7, has served with the Seattle Police Department for five years. A few months into his career, Jaeger located a burglary suspect and detained the perpetrator by sitting on him. Photographed Monday, May 11, 2015, in Seattle, Washington. (Jordan Stead, seattlepi.com)

Tracking Police Dog Jaeger, age 7, has served with the Seattle Police Department for five years. A few months into his career, Jaeger located a burglary suspect and detained the perpetrator by sitting on him. Photographed Monday, May 11, 2015, in Seattle, Washington. (Jordan Stead, seattlepi.com)

Tracking Police Dog Jaeger, age 7, has served with the Seattle Police Department for five years. A few months into his career, Jaeger located a burglary suspect and detained the perpetrator by sitting on him. Photographed Monday, May 11, 2015, in Seattle, Washington. (Jordan Stead, seattlepi.com)