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micro four thirds

Kevin-Lee The Phoblographer Olympus PEN E-PL7 Product Images (1 of 9)

The Olympus PEN E-PL7 is the fifth (sixth including the E-PL6) camera to reuse the OMD EM5’s 16MP sensor since it was first announced in February 2012. Over the years Olympus has tuned the performance of its imaging chip as it’s been incorporated into camera bodies including the PEN E-P5 and OMD EM10. But even with these improvements and tweaks, we still have to wonder how much more can we squeeze out of this nearly three-year-old sensor?

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Image courtesy of ePhotoZine

Voigtländer has announced a new Nokton 10.5mm f0.95 lens for Micro Four Thirds cameras. In terms of full frame equivalency the lens offers a nice and wide 21mm equivalent focal length. What’s more–users will be able to get up close with their subject at 17-centimeters (about 6-inches) taking full advantage of all the bokeh that f0.95 lens creates; though we’re still sure that it won’t be very much.

ePhotoZine got a chance to play with the lens and it was thoroughly impressed with the lens’ sharpness and straight lines despite being a wide-angle prime. With the lens being made up of 13 elements in 10 groups, there are undoubtedly more than a few aspherical lenses to help reduce distortion.

The lens is reportedly due to be released sometime in 2015, however, Voigtländer has yet to announce a price. We can’t wait to get this lens in for a full review and until then check past the break for more specs on the Voigtländer Nokton 10.5mm f0.95.

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Sony NEX 3N product photo (1 of 1)ISO 1601-200 sec at f - 2.0

Years ago when the idea of mirrorless cameras and systems was pitched, the premise behind it all was that overall it would create a lighter and smaller kit. And for the most part, manufacturers have stuck to that statement. But at certain times, they really don’t seem to be sticking to it. This concern comes up now more than ever considering that Sony has a full frame mirrorless camera system.

Photographer Tom Northencold wrote a piece recently about why he’s sticking to Micro Four Thirds. The answer: the weight differences vs his Nikon system.

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Panasonic GM5 first impressions images (4 of 5)ISO 4001-60 sec at f - 5.0

Panasonic has always embraced the philosophy of having small cameras with a very big sensor: and today’s announcement of the GM5 is no different. This camera is targeted at the photographer that wants something incredibly compact–dare we say pocketable. The camera, which is available in either black or red, sports a magnesium body with a 1,165K dot EVF, had a 921K 3 inch touch screen WiFi, 60p video, and allows for editing to be done in the camera.

At its heart is a 16MP Four Thirds size sensor–and that allows the camera to shoot 5fps. When it launches at the start of November, you’ll be able to pick it up at an $899 price point.

Also being announced today is the new Panasonic 14mm f2.5–which has six elements in five groups with 3 aspherical elements. Additionally, it sports seven aperture blades. More info and photos are after the jump.

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Panasonic LX100 first impressions product images (4 of 6)ISO 4001-100 sec at f - 4.5

It’s been rumored for a very long time, and today Panasonic and the Micro Four Thirds world have launched their direct competitor to the large sensor point and shoots. The Panasonic LX100 is not only directly squared against the other high end point and shoots out there, but it is also the company’s dueling sword to Fujifilm’s X100T.

At its heart is a Micro Four Thirds size sensor (the same 12.8MP sensor in the GX7) with a lens that starts at f1.7 (24mm) and ends at f2.8 (75mm) in its zoom range. The lens has Power OIS too–which is very typical for Panasonic. The camera has has the same processing engine as the GH4–which makes is truly a composite camera.

We got to spend some time with the LX100 at Panasonic’s New Jersey headquarters earlier this month. And trust us, it’s a reason to get hyped.

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Samsung 85mm f1.4 review images (1 of 2)ISO 1001-800 sec at f - 2.0

Want more Useful Photography Tips? Check them out right here.

Before you even get into reading this piece, know that we’re talking about an actual lens focal length, not equivalent to field of view. Look at it this way: you like taking photos with a 50mm lens, right? Let’s say you’re working with Micro Four Thirds camera options. In order to get a 50mm field of view, you need to slap a 25mm lens on your camera. But guess what? That 25mm lens will still act like a 25mm lens. It will be just as distorted and even though you’re still using the center area of the lens more or less you’ll still get all the problems that a lens like that faces. To get rid of that distortion, you’ll need a longer focal length. I found this out the hard way when working with a subject of larger stature. Though I felt the images looked great, she didn’t–and the only thing that really could have helped would have been a longer lens.

To eliminate that distortion to begin with, you’ll need to work with longer focal lengths. The generally accepted portrait focal length is an 85mm or longer. Now again, I’m not talking about an 85mm equivalent field of view on Micro Four Thirds. I’m saying that I need at least an 85mm focal length. Yes, the M43 coalition does a great job with making sure that their lenses are superb, but if you’re going to do portraits then you should eliminate any sort of distortion problems from the start.

Moving up to larger formats like APS-C or Full Frame, we think that the 85mm to the 135mm range is a great area to start working. Remember, the main thing that you’ll need to do is keep the distortion down to begin with.