web analytics

kodak

The Affordable 4x5 camera

The larger the format is that you’re working with, the more time it will surely take you to get a single image due to all the work that goes into it. And while large format cameras can be expensive, a duo from Europe are Kickstarting a more affordable camera. It’s called the Intrepid 4×5 camera, and it promises to be a light weight camera made from birch ply wood.

The Intrepid will take 75-300mm lens boards, has ground glass for focusing, comes with a choice of bellows colors, and folds down into a very compact size. With it being made from plywood though, I’d personally want it to be finished with a sealant of some sort to prevent moisture from affecting it too much in the long run. For the 125 Euro that they’re apparently charging for the camera though, we can’t really expect much.

It will take standard film cases for the image loading: which means that you can enjoy many of the offerings from Fujifilm, Kodak and Ilford still available for the format.

The intro video is after the jump, but be sure to head over to their Kickstarter page too to see the different rewards offered.

[click to continue…]

8b6acd2837364a347d7f3f78322a0da9_large

All images courtesy of CineStill

What the world needs right about now is more medium format film: and that’s exactly what the Brothers Wright are looking to create. CineStill announced a new Kickstarter initiative for a medium format 800 ISO 120 film. Like their first entry into the market, this one will be Tungsten color balanced. They’re calling it 800T, and again it is rebadged Kodak cinema film. This time, they’re using Kodak Vision 500T film– which is probably the 65mm film version but rescaled for medium format still camera bodies.

CineStill states that each roll of the film has 250 exposures and medium format 120 film has on average around 12 exposures if you shoot in the 645 format. So each roll could be split into around 20 CineStill films.

The film is said to work with regular C-41 processing–which means that it can be developed at many local stores. One of the biggest things about this film though is the fact that there aren’t very many high ISO medium format films left and available in color–so this would open up new possibilities for medium format shooters everywhere (myself included.)

More images and the company’s new promo video are after the jump.

Via Petapixel

[click to continue…]

bwXXgram

CineStill, the folks who put out the Tungsten 800 film that is more or less rewrapped Kodak cinema film, are continuing in their traditions with a new black and white film offering. Japan Camera Hunter got the scoop–and according to Bellamy the new film is a black and white film called bwXX that comes from Kodak’s XX black and white cinema film stock. He states that the film has been used in Schindler’s List (1993), Memento (2000), Kafka (1991), Casino Royale (2006), I’m Not There (2007), and many many more.”

Kodak states that you should expose it at around 250 or 200 ISO depending on various situations. If anything, the film looks like a high contrast black and white emulsion–which is beautiful and has some very silky smooth blacks to it.

Bellamy is giving away a bunch of the film on this site when you purchase a 35mm camera of some sort. Otherwise, CineStill lists the film at $7.49 a roll.

Kodak BW400CN

For those that knew the true beauty of the film today is a very sad day for many photographers.

In a statement recently issued by Kodak, the company has now discontinued their BW400CN film. Though the film isn’t as prolific as Tri-X, it still created beautiful portraits and images overall. In fact, Kodak billed it as the finest grain black and white chromogenic film made. And in some ways, they’re correct–though the grain isn’t as fine as with some of their other emulsions.

Kodak is also stating that it should still be available in the market for around the next six months; though it can often be seen sold at places like WalGreens and more. So in fact, it may not last that long.

When I first started the site, I reviewed the Leica M7 using this film. It was an awesome experiences.

B&H Photo, Adorama and Amazon still have stock of the film if you’d like to store some in the freezer for another day.

 

scan0004

Image by Dan Zvereff. Used in our previous interview with him.

For all the lovers of the analog world out there, you should know that a recent Change.org petition to revive one of the greatest films that the world has seen: Kodak Aerochrome. Shooting Film first caught wind of the story and states that UK based Jasmin G is calling on Kodak Alaris and the Lomography company to revive the film. Lomography tried to do a variant called Lomochrome Purple, but it totally isn’t the same thing. While Lomochrome puts an emphasis on purple colors, Aerochrome put it on a pinkish purplish red.

How do they do this? For starters, Aerochrome was an infrared film originally developed for surveillance reasons. Years ago, the US would fly planes over the Congo and other regions with dense vegetation to find guerilla troops. When developed, the film would render the greens into a color like what you see in the image above that leads this story. However, later on the commercial world started to use it for art projects. Dan Zvereff and Richard Mosse are two famous photographers that come to mind at first. We have a full introduction to the film at this link–which also explains how it works.

[click to continue…]

julius motal film photography high schools

For $250,000 on eBay, you can become the owner of one of Kodak’s 60-inch acetate film coating lines. The massive machine was put on sale by Moses B. Glick, LLC, an industrial surplus machinery dealer, according to the Democrat & Chronicle. The eBay listing says that there are 18 of these lines available, which isn’t surprising given that Kodak ended acetate base production last year.

The listing reads “Originally used for acetate film coating but may be repurposed.”  Of course, if you want to be the next Kodak, then this is an essential buy.

Though we’d caution against being the next Kodak given the trajectory of the company in recent years, particularly with the licensing of its name to JK Images, a company that introduced several unimpressive cameras at CES earlier this year. Kodak’s film lives on under Kodak Alaris, but Kodak lost some of its gravitas when it ceased production of Kodachrome in 2009 and processing in 2010.

At the time of this post, there around 70 people watching the listing, and there have been two declined offers. Unfortunately, there’s no way to know what those offers were, and we’re not sure how many there will be.

Perhaps there’s someone out there with deep pockets and a film itch they’ve been looking to scratch. Who knows? We’d be more than happen to see something happen with this in a way that advances photography. There are 18 available, which means there are 18 chances for something truly great to happen.