Jack Seikaly: Digital Infrared Photography Influenced by Kodak Aerochrome

All images by Jack Seikaly. Used with permission.

“I’m a confused pessimist at heart. I view a world that is in a constant state of chaos and anarchy, generally getting worse over time,” says Jack Seikaly about his infrared photography. “The message I try to portray in my infrared shots is this: ‘the world may be terrible, but look at all the beauty it also has to offer.'”

Born in London, raised in Beirut, and living in Montreal, Jack has been given the privilege to view the world from multiple perspectives and understand different cultures. Along the way, he’s been taking photos. Like many others out there, he was infatuated with the HDR photography process until he started to go towards the world of Infrared. “I’ve now opened my eyes to the wonders of infrared, continuously evolving my technique and style,” he tell us.

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Review: Capture One Pro Film Styles (Capture One Pro 10)

For a fairly long time now, I’ve ditched Lightroom for Capture One and I couldn’t be happier. But something I’ve missed is having film profiles for my images–if not because they didn’t necessarily look like film, because I just genuinely liked the look of the photos. Then I discovered the Capture One Styles, that makes the Capture One Film styles which emulate the look of lots of very popular film emulsions.

Considering just how good Capture One is, I was very delighted to test these out. But for this film shooter, I found some disappointment.

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Film Review: Kodak Tri-X 400 (35mm and 120; Various Formats)

Opening photo by Håkan Dahlström. Used with a Creative Commons License.

Arguably the most famous black and white film of our time has to be Kodak Tri-x 400; it’s been with photojournalists for years and years. These days though, most folks can’t tell the difference between Kodak Tri-x 400 and so many other emulsions on the market. Despite this, it’s still the most popular black and white film currently available with the highest possibility of never going discontinued.

So, let’s start this review, shall we?

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Street Photography and Kodak Tri-X Film: 62 Years of Going With The Grain

This is a syndicated blog post from our premium publication La Noir Image. For more stories like this, sign up for a subscription at a fantastic price. All images and text by writer Mason Resnick.

In recent years, thanks in part to social media and the ease with which participants can share images, street photography has enjoyed unprecedented popularity. A generation of digital cameras, inspired in part by the classic tools of street shooters, has combined with the power of social networks and easy image sharing to empower a new generation of photographers to embrace street photography. The results: A glut of photos: many of them mediocre, some good, and some of them really good.

But even the best of digital street photos have a problem. Digital street photos are too smooth. They’re too clean. They seem clinical. They have very little noise, and certainly no grain. That grittiness, dirtiness that reflects the chaos of the street is missing. And so, software tricks are employed to emulate the graininess of classic films. Click a button, and your grainless digital image suddenly looks like it was shot with the film of choice for many street photographers throughout the years: Kodak Tri-X.

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Review: Kodak Ektar 100 (35mm and 120; Various Formats)

For a really long time, if you wanted very vivid colors in your film photos you needed to go to a slide film–but when Kodak introduced Kodak Ektar 100 things changed. Photographers were able to get punchy, vibrant, saturated colors with the ease of use that negative film provides. To this day, Kodak Ektar 100 is used to a variety of applications with one of the most common ones being landscapes. However it is also in use for portraiture as its low ISO value allows for incredibly sharp photos.

And for many lovers of digital cameras, this may also be one of your favorite Kodak film emulsions.

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Less Than 48 Hours are Left in Our Analog Zine Kickstarter! Go Donate!

Hi everyone,

As you most likely know, our Analog Zine Kickstarter was fully funded. Again, a genuine thank you to everyone who donated. But I’d like to summon everyone’s attention who was interested in donating to the project but didn’t because it was too early on. With less than 48 hours left in the campaign, at this point you’re basically just buying a zine with the option of a year long basic subscription to La Noir Image; our premium black and white photography website.

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Film Review: Kodak Portra 400 (35mm and 120, Various Formats)

Years and years ago, Kodak announced something that would endure for quite a while: Kodak Portra 400. Available in the 120, 35mm, and large formats, the film was and still is incredibly popular with photographers who like shooting portraits. It’s highly valued for its muted tones–which tends to go against much of what digital photography seems to offer straight out of the camera. However, Portra is in use for much more than just this. Lots of photographers use it as their every day film because they just like it. But this tends to be more the thought process of those that shoot 35mm. At 120, you’re getting far less shots per roll and often work to get the best photos you can in one single shot due to higher stakes–even more so than with 35mm.

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Why The Analog Photography World is a Far Nicer Place Than Digital

Years and years ago, there were film photographers who loved taking their lenses and cameras into labs and testing the results with charts and such. For the most part, that still happens with digital. But modern analog and film photography has evolved. Lots of people are turned off by it, but also lots of people are incredibly attracted to it for its freedom of expression and the amount of raw talent that goes into creating a photo in-camera without Photoshopping or Lightroom work. Sure, lots of the same things done in Lightroom can be done in the darkroom, but that’s just when you’re printing. Instead, modern analog is more about the art: and a million times better than modern digital.

Before I go on, this isn’t a battle of digital vs film, digital vs analog, etc.

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