Review: JCH StreetPan 400 Film (35mm Film)

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Canon EOS Elan 7 product images (11 of 12)ISO 4001-40 sec at f - 2.8

It’s rare when a new film hits the market–but it would make a whole lot of sense that someone like Bellamy Hunt decides to create one. Japan Camera Hunter Street Pan 400 film is an emulsion available in 35mm and was developed to really be shot in low light situations. In fact, he states that it works best in red lighting. For the casual street photographer, that means sundown as you head out on your commute to go back home at the end of the workday. Beyond this, ensure that the film lab working to develop the film knows what they’re doing.

Born out of a discontinued surveillance film made from Agfa, StreetPan 400 isn’t a respooled film, but one that’s reborn according to Bellamy.

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How to Shoot Better Portraits With Film

Mamiya C220 55mm f4.5
Kodak Portra 160VC (expired 2004)

Lead image by Joe Valtierra

Portraiture is a process–and in today’s digital photography world it’s always wonderful to embrace the slower and more methodical process of film photography. Yes, it’s difficult and it’s nowhere as forgiving as digital photography. But that’s what makes you a better photographer.

After years of screwing up with film over and over again, I learned a lot when it comes to shooting. There are a number of labs around the country that will develop film for you.

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Memory Lane: A Look at Notable Films Discontinued In The Last 4 Years

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The Fujifilm announcement earlier today that they would be officially discontinuing their PRO NS 160 Sheet film in Japan is just another reminder of the limited time we have left with the films that we have all grown to love. In the last 4 years alone we have lost some of the most iconic and legendary films, likely never to be truly replaced. So let’s take a quick look down memory lane at some of the discontinued emulsions that helped shape our our past.

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Exclusive: Fujifilm Japan Announces the End of Pro NS 160 Sheet Film, Discusses the Future of Film

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For a while now, Fujifilm Pro NS 160 has been discontinued in the United States (called NPS 160; and today Fujifilm is announcing the news of the discontinuation in Japan for the cut sheet film–120 format will continue to live on. As we’ve seen in the past few years, traditional film photography as we know it has been dwindling and shrinking when it comes to the traditional big two companies.

Of course, this is something that’s upsetting to the film world. Research will show you that Pro NS 160 was popular with portrait photographers (though it was used for a myriad of things) but of course wasn’t really used in a while.

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How to Become a Legitimate, World Renowned Street Photographer

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer VSCO film pack 3 street (1 of 1)ISO 1001-200 sec at f - 2.8

Street photography is pretty much as simple as going out and shooting photos of people in public–but there are the street photographers that do it better than everyone else and then there are those who do a lot of marketing. Indeed, there are terrible photographers with lots of gigs and sales and conversely there are photographers with great work and no gigs or sales. But the world of the Street photographer is different.

It gets even tougher when it comes to street photography for the reasons that your income will mostly rely on licensing and print sales from galleries. So how do you ensure you’ve got the work that counts? Here’s how!

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Kodak Professional Film App Now Helps You Find Development Locations

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Kodak Film photography app (1 of 1)ISO 2001-100 sec at f - 2.8

Today, Kodak Alaris announced that their Professional Film Photography app is now available for the iPad and Android in addition to the fact that iPhone users are getting new updates to their app.

The app is awesome for the analog shooters amongst us that want to keep supporting the alternative process of taking images compared to the more conventional digital format these days. It includes tech specs on each film, a sample photo, a sun calculator that lets you know when sunset is, a guide to teach you what types of film to use and BW darkroom home development tips and tricks.

More features are after the jump. The Kodak Professional Film app is available for free download right now.

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How to Get into Film Photography on the Cheap

The Pentax MX, one of the smallest 35mm film cameras

Film photography isn’t at all dead; in fact it’s evolving. What’s seemingly disappearing in terms of push and effort on behalf of the more traditional brands isn’t exactly so. The younger generation of photographers embrace the format as a way of trying something completely new that they didn’t really get a chance to use growing up. It’s a departure from the digital world that gets caught up in all the technical jargon and can easily blur the idea of art.

Film can also be an incredible learning tool if used correctly and can also give you lots of really cool and experimental uses with the right mentality. But you’re trying to get into film without breaking the bank, then here’s how.

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Ka Wing Falkena: Street Photography with Kodak Tri-X

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All images by Ka Wing Falkena. Used with permission.

Ka Wing Falkena is a Dutch photographer from Amsterdam who got into the art form by befriending a number of professional photographers who did a lot of street photography. “It was a bit scary in the beginning, but when that feeling was gone, I actually felt quite good.” he says in an email to the Phoblographer. “Walking on the street, only having to concentrate on light, composition and the subjects surrounding me, made me really relaxed. When I noticed that, I started doing it more and more.”

He’s been shooting for four years now, and tries to dedicate some time each day to the craft.

Like many of you, Ka Wing is a lover of Kodak Tri-X. But he tends to push his film quite a bit as he finds that it suits his creative vision.

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