web analytics

image quality

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Rokinon 10mm f2.8 review images product photos (1 of 4)ISO 4001-80 sec at f - 4.0

When it comes to ultra wide angle lenses, Rokinon has always offered great image quality at an affordable price. They recently announced their 10mm f2.8 for APS-C DSLRs from our usage, we think that it is a pretty decent option for architectural and landscape shooters. The lens has a better build quality than previous offerings and can also deliver some spectacular images.

[click to continue…]

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

When the Phase One IQ250 was announced, it was expected to outdo every DSLR in terms of image quality out there because of the large CMOS sensor. But when you get to the medium format level, you’re only as good as the body and the lenses. The IQ250 can output great images; but it isn’t without its drawbacks.

Or at least that what we’re finding so far…

[click to continue…]

Critique gservo-1382140326

Often our photography has a lot going for it. Sometimes it lacks a clear identity. Before we display our images, we get them critiqued. The first person who critiques your work should be you yourself. As photographers, we spend a lot of time and money wondering if our images are good. We spend time creating and editing the images. We spend money making sure we store the images correctly. We are all susceptible to flattery and we accept when people tell us our images are nice. With our own image though, we must be brutal and unforgiving.

The question is, just how do you do this? Here some tips to help.


[click to continue…]

Canon_G1_X_II_DxO_comparison

DxOMark continues to rate the sensors in current camera models, and their latest victim was the Canon G1 X Mk II. The successor to the original G1 X again comes with a fixed lens and a sensor larger than the (Micro) Four Thirds format, but still smaller than the APS-C format. Sporting a resolution of 15 megapixels, one is bound to assume that it would outperform the Micro Four Thirds crowd at least by a small margin–but actually, the opposite seems to be the case.

With an overall score of 58 points, the PowerShot G1 X Mk II is ranked even lower than its predecessor, wich managed to score 60 points. Compared to current Micro Four Thirds models, however, the G1 X Mk II is way behind: the Olympus OM-D E-M10′s sensor has received 72 points in DxOMark’s test, and even the tiny Panasonic GM1 scores a solid 64 points. But here’s the most interesting part: even Canon’s own PowerShot S120 with its tiny 1/1.7″ sensor scores almost as high as the G1 X Mk II, though of course it doesn’t hold up when it comes to dynamic range and high ISO noise.

This isn’t the first time that we see Canon sensors receiving bad ratings by DxOMark, though. Just recently, their lab tested the EOS Rebel T5, and it, too, was rated way lower than its immediate competition. But despite the mediocre ratings, Canon DSLRs still enjoy a huge popularity especially on western markets, and even the EOS M mirrorless system is very popular over in Japan. When it comes to pure image quality, though, it seems that you’re better of with almost any other brand.

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Sigma 50mm f1.4 Art Lens Review images (1 of 13)ISO 4001-800 sec at f - 3.5

Though they’re two different focal lengths, this question was bound to be asked by someone. Sigma now has two excellent options for full frame users from their Art series of lenses: their 50mm f1.4 DG HSM and their 35mm f1.4 DG HSM. Both have been tried and true to be capable performers. But which one is best for you?

Be sure to also check out our guide to Sigma’s prime lenses.

Editor’s Note: Check out our first sample imagesfull review, and comparison posts against the 35mm f1.4 and 50mm f1.4 version 1.

[click to continue…]

Chris GampatThe Phoblographer Sigma 50mm f1.4 lenses (3 of 3)ISO 2001-60 sec at f - 4.0

Sigma recently updated their 50mm f1.4 lens to include not only the Art branding badge, but also a totally new look to the lens. The new Art offering joins the 35mm f1.4 as another prime for DSLRs under the new Global Vision that the company is touting right now. Many folks own the older Sigma 50mm f1.4, and with the release of the new one you might be wondering if it’s worth an upgrade or not.

In our real world tests, we explore the differences.

Editor’s Note: Check out our first sample imagesfull review, and comparison posts against the 35mm f1.4 and 50mm f1.4 version 1.

[click to continue…]