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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer beach shot with tokina 70-200mm f4 (1 of 1)ISO 1001-1250 sec at f - 4.0

Tokina has always been a maker of some excellent third party lenses, and the release of the Tokina 70-20mm f4 ATX Pro heralds this even more so. The recently announced lens isn’t billed as being weather sealed–but that doesn’t meant that it wasn’t able to take a beating. The lens also exhibits great image quality and some of the best bokeh that we’ve seen from a zoom lens.

But while it’s an overall great lens, know that it doesn’t specialize in any one particular aspect.

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Panasonic GH4 product lead photo (1 of 1)ISO 4001-40 sec at f - 4.0

The Panasonic GH4 is a camera that, when announced, was for the most part an incremental upgrade from the GH3–on paper at least. However, the GH3 was also quite a good camera. But if you loved the GH3, then you’ll be amazed by what the GH4 can do. It focuses faster, has better image quality and feels great in the hand. However, this is all really to a certain point.

At its heart, the GH4 houses a 16.05MP Four Thirds sensor, has magnesium alloy construction, 49 autofocus points, 4K video recording, a 3 inch 1,035K dot LCD screen, and a 2,359K-Dot OLED Live View Finder. But is that enough to make you leave your current camera?

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Fujifilm hybrid af pixes

In a similar move to what Canon has done with Hybrid AF on their 70D sensors, Fujifilm has put in a patent for Hybrid AF pixels according to Fuji Rumors. Essentially, what it’s doing is embedding special pixels that offer both phase detection and light gathering abilities onto the sensor to work in conjunction with the contrast detection focusing while also not jeopardizing image quality. Of course, the light transmission won’t be at 100% according to the patent due to the pixels functioning to do two jobs.

On other systems, the sensors have pixels just for phase detection–at least that’s what Egami is hinting at. Of course, when this hits the market we only expect it to do a marginally better job in its first iteration. In future iterations, it will most likely become much better as algorithms improve.

Indeed, when this does finally come to the consumer market, it will be awesome for street photographers, wedding photographers and event shooters. And it’ll be very exciting to see what happens when this comes out.

Local Festival To Refine Your Concert Photography gservo-02287-20140713-2

If you are a photographer who enjoys music, we’re positive that you’d had the urge to be a concert photographer. It’s a hard field to get into, and if you really want to improve, you have to sell your soul on occasion to get close to the stage. The are a lot of hurdles in the way to getting better at this style of photography. But one of the biggest issues newer photographers can have is access–but local free festivals provide an excellent opportunity for practice that doesn’t cost your soul. Here are some tips to use them to your advantage.

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Nikon D810 first impressions product images (8 of 8)ISO 4001-50 sec at f - 3.2

When Nikon announced the D810, we were intrigued to see what they would do to improve the already great camera. For starters, they threw out the AA filter, bumped the megapixel count to 36.3, added the new EXPEED 4 processor, incorporated the D4s’ Multi-Cam 3500-FX AF sensor offering up 15 cross-type and 51 overall focusing points in total as well as the ability to shoot at up to 5fps. But beyond this, they gave the camera a small RAW mode, a 3.2-inch 1229K-dot LCD and expanded the camera’s ISO range to a D4s-esque 64 to 12,800 that’s also expandable to 32 and 51,200. The Nikon D810 can shoot movies in Full-HD 1080p all the way to 60fps. 

So when we first got our review unit from Adorama, we were interested to see if it’s worth the upgrade for many D800 owners.

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Panasonic 20mm f1.7 II product images first impressions (4 of 5)ISO 4001-500 sec at f - 3.5

Panasonic’s 20mm f1.7 was a lens that created legends and made jaws drop everywhere. Released around the initial start of the Micro Four Thirds launches, the lens was a sharp pancake offering that also had a wide aperture and image quality overall to boot. Fast forward a couple of years and the lens is on its second iteration. DxOMark has stated that this lens isn’t as sharp as its predecessor, but we all know that a little bit of post-production work can fix that.

We’ve been spending some quality time getting to know the lens, and so far we’re pretty impressed by what we see. But of course, it isn’t all sugar and sweets. And at $427.99, it may be a bit too much to stomach.

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