Perfect Portraits: 4 Budget Portrait Lenses For the Canon EOS System under $1,000

Portrait photography is no doubt one of the those niches of photography that attracts many new photographers to the industry, both as hobbyists and professionals–and finding budget friendly portrait lenses can be tough. That said, the overwhelming majority simply doesn’t have the budget to spend on top class professional portrait lenses, so today we are taking a look at some of the best budget oriented portrait lenses for the Canon EOS System.

If you have another camera system no worries, we will be following this up with budget portrait lens roundups for other systems as well. Previously we have looked at Fujifilm’s X-Series, and will continue on to the other systems after we hit Canon today.

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The Today Show’s Al Roker Produces Segment With All Analog Film Photos

In case you haven’t noticed, analog film photography is back! And as proof of that, the folks over at the Today Show did a special segment on it. But this wasn’t just any segment: the majority of it was shot with analog film photography through still images with voiceovers–something the Today Show’s Al Roker says has never been done before. The segment was shot on 35mm film, Fujifilm peel apart, Impossible Project film, Fujifilm Instax mini, Instax wide, and a bit of wet plate collodion.

Talk about an expensive production, right?

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After 10 Years, Adox Scala 160 ISO BW Reversal Film is In Stock at Freestyle Photographic

Last year, Adox (who own Agfa) announced they were coming back out with Adox Scala 160 ISO BW Reversal film–and now it’s available and in stock at Freestyle Photographic according to an email they sent out recently. You can snag a roll for $7.99. This marks the arrival and successful relaunch of yet another film. Adox Scala 160 is a panchromatic film that has been gone for nearly 10 years from the market and is touted as an emulsion that delivers really high sharpness.

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35mm vs 28mm Lenses: A Guide To Which One You Should Choose

The obvious answer to the question of 35mm vs 28mm lens choice is whatever suits you; but the issue is that sometimes photographers require input from others. The two classic focal lengths have been used by many photographers over the years to create fantastic work. Each lens and focal length has their strengths and weaknesses, but after some time one is often more preferred over the other.

We’ve used a number of classic 28mm and 35mm lenses over time in our testing of lenses. So we went through our sample photos to help give you some guidance.

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Review: Kodak Ektar 100 (35mm and 120; Various Formats)

For a really long time, if you wanted very vivid colors in your film photos you needed to go to a slide film–but when Kodak introduced Kodak Ektar 100 things changed. Photographers were able to get punchy, vibrant, saturated colors with the ease of use that negative film provides. To this day, Kodak Ektar 100 is used to a variety of applications with one of the most common ones being landscapes. However it is also in use for portraiture as its low ISO value allows for incredibly sharp photos.

And for many lovers of digital cameras, this may also be one of your favorite Kodak film emulsions.

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Film Review: Kodak Portra 400 (35mm and 120, Various Formats)

Years and years ago, Kodak announced something that would endure for quite a while: Kodak Portra 400. Available in the 120, 35mm, and large formats, the film was and still is incredibly popular with photographers who like shooting portraits. It’s highly valued for its muted tones–which tends to go against much of what digital photography seems to offer straight out of the camera. However, Portra is in use for much more than just this. Lots of photographers use it as their every day film because they just like it. But this tends to be more the thought process of those that shoot 35mm. At 120, you’re getting far less shots per roll and often work to get the best photos you can in one single shot due to higher stakes–even more so than with 35mm.

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Japan Camera Hunter Street Pan 400 Film is Coming in 120 Format Before Year’s End (EXCLUSIVE)

It’s no secret that Japan Camera Hunter Street Pan 400 film has become very popular with street photographers and just those curious about film. It’s available in 35mm right now, but Bellamy Hunt, the Japan Camera Hunter himself, tells us that it’s coming in 120 and that we should expect it before the end of the year.

Bellamy said he’s going to need to do pre-sales of the film, but that he doesn’t want it to be super expensive. “Likely release is around August at the moment, though there are always holdups. It will definitely be before Christmas,” says Bellamy in an email.

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Review: Wolverine F2D Mighty 20MP 7-in-1 Film to Digital Converter

With analog film photography on the rise, there is obviously the need and want for many city dwelling photographers with little room in apartments to want to scan their photos; and that’s where the Wolverine F2D Mighty 20MP 7-in-1 Film to Digital Converter comes into play. No, it’s not a drum scanner. And it’s surely not one of those scanners well over $1,000. But it’s also not supposed to be. This film scanner scans 110 film, super 8 film, and 35mm negative and slide film in addition to black and white. For only  $131.73 though, you really can’t complain about the quality.

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