First Impressions: Fujifilm GF 45mm f2.8 R WR (Sample Images Included)

I applaud Fujifilm for delivering the Fujifilm GF 45mm f2.8 R WR to us in such a short time. Being the equivalent of the 35mm field of view, I also applaud them delivering a wide angle medium format lens with a relatively fast aperture. Like the other Fujifilm GF lenses, this one is weather sealed and is putting an emphasis on delivering only the absolute best image quality from Fujifilm. What’s really interesting here though is that a lens like this delivers the equivalent field of view of an approximately 35mm lens, but is inherently a longer focal length. What that translates into is less distortion for something like portraiture–which I’m positive the Fujifilm GF 45mm f2.8 R WR will be used for.

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Film Review: Fujifilm Superia (200, 400, 800 and 1600)

Fujifilm Superia is oddly enough considered a consumer film. Why? I’m not exactly sure–especially considering that it wasn’t so long ago in history that every photojournalist swore by Superia 800. But nevertheless, Fujifilm Superia isn’t considered to be one of the more professional grade films as something like say Fujifilm Pro400H. But if you head into various Flickr and Facebook groups, lots of photographers still pledge allegiance to Fujifilm Superia. The film comes in a variety of speeds including ISO 200, ISO 400, ISO 800 and ISO 1600. In some ways, you can perhaps liken it to being a bit like Ilford Delta–except that it’s color and from Fujifilm.

But one thing is for sure, if you want great general use film, Fujifilm Superia is a fantastic option.

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Film Emulsion Review: Kodak Portra 160 (35mm and 120 Formats)

When you work with a film like Kodak Portra 160, you get a pretty fine detailed film designed to be used more or less with controlled lighting. Though interestingly enough, I’ve personally had much better results working with many other films using controlled lighting and instead found that this film is one of the best to be used with natural light. Designed for skin tones in portraiture, Kodak Portra 160 has a very muted color palette but not as pastel as Fujifilm’s Pro 160 NS–its closest competitor which is now discontinued. Like many other films, it is available in both 120 and 35mm. But if you’re reading this website, then you’re probably only using it in 120.

I’ve been using Kodak Portra 160 for years; and even though I prefer to work with 400, 160 is surely a nice film in the right settings.

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New Patents Further Point to Nikon Full Frame Mirrorless System

We have been following reports for months now that Nikon is at work on a full frame mirrorless system to take on Sony in the full frame mirrorless segment. These reports have been based, at least in part, on Nikon confirmations of a ‘pro’ mirrorless system that they have in development. However, to this point, no official confirmation has been made in regards to the system being full frame or not. But we have been given yet another clue pointing to a full frame mirrorless system. Continue reading…

Film Review: Lomography Earl Grey 100 Black and White (35mm and 120)

Years ago, Lomography introduced Lomography Earl Grey 100 black and white film and added yet another entry into a market looking for more 100 ISO black and white films. There are a few from Ilford, none from Kodak except for T-Max, one from Fujifilm and a few other manufacturers producing them. But slower ISO black and white films aren’t really spoken of except for Acros. Black and white ISO 100 films are great for studio and portraiture work but in many cases have the versatility to deliver great results when pushed.

Lomography’s Earl Grey 100 used to be an older emulsion of Kodak T-Max 100. But that’s changed over the years. It’s now a Fomapan emulsion. But in the end, who cares? All that matters is the results.

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Film Review: Lomography Color Negative 400 (35mm and 120)

Lomography Color Negative 400 is one of those alternative color films that unfortunately isn’t spoken about enough. And for some of us, that’s perfectly fine. I’m okay with all the haters of Lomography refusing to understand what the company is doing and saving more film for me. Walking into the West Village store in NYC to be greeted warmly by the employees and always having the ability to buy some simply makes me happier. And all the folks who only shoot digital and only care about shooting digital can keep doing so. They’ll never understand the awesome secret that the rest of us know that is ironically being published on one of the biggest indie photo blogs on the web.

That’s all just fine.

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What Makes The 35mm Focal Length Special, And Why You Should Use It

We talk a lot about various lenses for new announcements, recommendations, and other reasons. But what we don’t often touch on is the focal lengths themselves, the traits most lenses of that length share and why a photographer would want to use a given focal length. So, we are going to be doing a little series on various popular focal lengths, describing their traits, what they are known for and why you may want to make use of them in your kit. Today we start with our first, the 35mm focal length. Continue reading…

How To Choose The Best 35mm Lens For You

The 35mm focal length is popular for all sorts of photography niches, from weddings to boudoir to wildlife to landscapes. This makes your choice of 35mm lens extra important because you are likely intending to use it in multiple scenarios. You don’t want to spend more money than you need to, and certainly, don’t want to waste money by having to buy another lens should you skimp out too much. So in this post, we are going to talk about things to consider and how to choose the best 35mm lens for you. Continue reading…