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35mm

Chris GampatThe Phoblographer Sigma 50mm f1.4 V2 images (2 of 2)ISO 1001-60 sec at f - 1.4

“Use a 50mm lens! It’s got a normal perspective! It will see just like you see! Taking photos will never be easier! Look at all the glorious bokeh!”

No. Just no. No a thousand times and a million times over that. So long have I heard something preached over and over again to consumers and photographers in general just starting to get into the photography world and too long have I wanted to say that it is nothing else but absolute garbage.

I was just like many of you at one point or another: a photographer that was a total novice and looking to learn about anything while trying to discover myself as a photographer. And in many cases I used the 50mm focal length. It really started with my 5D Mk II and the 50mm f1.8 II–otherwise known to many shooters as the cheapest nifty fifty you can get your hands on. Yes, it’s sharp when stopped down. Yes, you can get beautiful bokeh. And even more so, you can make potential clients look good and deliver beautiful images with one.

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Sigma 50mm f1.4 Art Lens Review images (1 of 13)ISO 4001-800 sec at f - 3.5

We’re curious about the age long debate for you guys. While every photographer is taught that 50mm lenses give you a more normal perspective closer to what the human eye sees, many photographers have made very valid arguments for the 35mm field of view.

So with that in mind we wonder: do you see the world in 35mm or 50mm?

We’d love to hear your thoughts though. Click the poll below and also let us know your thoughts in the comments below.

Do you see the world in 35mm or 50mm?

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The-Phoblographer-Infographic-on-Film-sizes

Inspired by Zack Arias’s video on film and digital sensor size comparisons, we decided to whip up a quick infographic for you on the different film sizes available in a friendly comparison. Think it’s cool to have a full frame 35mm sensor in your camera? Well consider the fact that you can get 645 (6×4.5) 6×7 film cameras for fairly cheap. Sure, you’ll have to pay for the film expenses, but you’ll also put more effort into you photos and have loads more keeper shots if you’re careful. Plus, you likely won’t upgrade your camera every couple of years.

As we show in the infographic above, 35mm film is smaller compared to everything else. In fact, 35mm film was originally invented to please consumers, not professionals. It was designed quite literally for novices but because the standard once people could deliver great work with it.

Sound familiar? It sounds a lot like the phone generation.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Get excited! It’s the weekend and there are loads of really cool projects that you can work on. Here is a list of some you can do with a 35mm lens. Go challenge yourself!

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Sigma 50mm f1.4 Art Lens Review images (1 of 13)ISO 4001-800 sec at f - 3.5

When it comes to getting a first prime lens, many of us on the staff reached for the 50mm f1.8–otherwise known as the nifty 50. But as time progressed, almost the entire staff also moved onto the 35mm field of view. In fact, many of my personal friends have too because 35mm lenses could arguably be stated to have a field of view of what you actually see in a scene. But this is one of the biggest debates for prime lens owners: 35mm or 50mm. In a recent video, DigitalRev tried to solve this debate. Kai makes some great points stating that one is a great travel lens and street photography lens and great for working with tight spaces, but when it comes to getting bokeh you’ll want to go for the other (obviously the 50mm).

And just in case you’re curious, you should check out our Sigma 35mm vs 50mm Art comparison. The video on choosing a 35mm or a 50mm lens is after the jump.

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film_blog_header

Whether you’re thinking about getting into film, or you’ve magically picked up an old SLR and are confused about how to use it, hopefully this little guide can steer you in the right direction.

The actual process of shooting film isn’t that much different from digital. Assuming you understand how exposure works, then the principle is exactly the same.

If you come from shooting RAW on a digital camera then really you only lose three features.

– Ability to change ISO

– Ability to change White Balance.

– *shocker* Ability to preview your shot

Editor’s Note: This post was originally published at Peter Stewart’s blog. It has been syndicated with permission.

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