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35mm

julius motal the phoblographer Loxia 35 mm Product Sample 2014.05.08 3

Fresh from Zeiss’s factory come two new lenses for Sony’s full-frame E-mount line of cameras: the Loxia 35mm f2 and the Loxia 50mm f2. Each lens is solely manual focus and has a clickless aperture ring and a depth of field scale. True to Zeiss’ tradition, the lenses have a metal body, and to meet the demands of the A7/R/S, they’re weather-sealed, too. They’ll get their first display at Photokina in two weeks.

Based on the tech specs, these lenses will be a boon for street photographers and photojournalists, and we bet that the 50mm in particular will work well for portrait photographers both outside and in the studio.

The 50mm f2 will be available in October for $949.99, and the 35mm f2 will be available towards the end of the year for $1299.99. Once we get the lenses in, we’ll be sure to review them for you.

Head on for tech specs and product images. [click to continue…]

IbarionexPhoblographerFixedFocalTravel01

During two trips to Europe, I’ve decided to shoot primarily with a fixed focal length. During my first trip to Paris, I mounted a Sigma 30mm f1.4 lens on my Canon 60D and shot virtually all our travels with the equivalent of a 50mm focal length. For this trip to France, I have been shooting with a Fujifilm X100s which with its 23mm lens sports the equivalent of a 35mm focal length. Though I initially focused on the potential disadvantages, the reality was that working this simply has its benefits.

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Reflecta ProScan 10T

Great news for 35mm film photographers with a digital workflow: German manufacturer Reflecta has a new 35mm film scanner with a nominal resolution of up to 10.000 dpi, which is higher than anything you’ll find on other consumer film scanners. In addition, the ProScan 10T promises a very high dynamic range of 3.9 DMax, which should be sufficient even for scanning such dense slide films as Velvia 50.

Currently, the highest-resolving 35mm film scanner is Plustek’s OpticFilm 8200i, though its nominal resolution of 7200 dpi only really exists on paper. But even if the Reflecta only manages to achieve half its nominal resolution out of a scan, it would still resolve at 5000 dpi, which is a lot of detail and close to the theoretical maximum that you can squeeze out of 35mm film.

So far, the scanner has only been announced in Germany, and at this point it is unclear whether it’ll ever make it to overseas markets. With a retail price of € 469 (US-$ 643) it is also not quite cheap, even though an actual US retail price might be a bit lower should it be officially sold in the states. In which case it will probably run under the Pacific Image brand name.

Via heise Foto

Boxes of Kodachrome 64 film in 135 format. (Credit: Metroplex on Wikimedia Commons)

Boxes of Kodachrome 64 film in 135 format. (Credit: Metroplex on Wikimedia Commons)

We continue our series on the Basics of Photography with the letter K, and today’s subject is Kodachrome. Now, some of you will undoubtedly wonder why anyone would deem a discontinued slide film basic photography knowledge. But the answer is really rather simple: Kodachrome was probably the single most influential photographic medium of all time, and it played a significant role in shaping the face of modern color photography and photojournalism. In this article, we’re going to take a look at the rise and fall of this film, and explore the photography that was created with it.

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Ricoh GXR with Leica product photos (4 of 6)

The world of prime lens users can be divided into two categories: fans of the 35mm focal length, and fans of the 50mm focal length. Some prefer the slightly wider angle-of-view of the 35mm, while others prefer the more restricted view of a 50mm. Now, when buying into a camera system, you might want to make sure that there is a lens available corresponding to your preferred focal length.

Pentax, for example, used to have a selection of both 35mm and 50mm lenses back in the days of film, but that changed with the digital age when 35mm lenses suddenly became equivalent to 50mm in terms of angle-of-view, due to the smaller format of the APS-C sensor. In the current DA lineup of lenses designed specifically for digital SLRs, you’ll find several lenses corresponding to the classic 50mm, but none that will satisfy the needs of a 35mm shooter.

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93831-instagram2-presets-for-lightroom-samples-tree-original-1358439909

Weekend Humor isn’t meant to be taken seriously. So don’t. We’re serious.

Instagram has been at cruising altitude since its acquisition by Facebook nearly two years ago. With the same 16 filters and more than 150 million users, the photo sharing service is steadily approaching a plateau, if not already there. Instagram doesn’t see much in the way of updates, and it was a year ago that Willow was added to the roster. In a recent interview, Kevin Morton, one of the lead designers at Instagram, revealed that the company is developing its filters into film stock.

“We realized that of the billions and billions of photos uploaded, most of them don’t need the filters,” Morton told us over the phone. “What good is bacon in Hefe, really? And all of those selfies- God, I hate that word. Go find some college junior studying photography and eating ramen in his dorm, and give him $20 for a portrait. Tell him you’d give him more, but you need to buy more ramen.”

Morton spearheaded the effort to hire some of the best in the film business in order to facilitate the filter-to-film transition. Kodak was the first company Morton called, and upon offering a living wage, he had eight new employees, all veterans in the film business. With the designs behind the filters readily available, the film division set to making film stock  in those styles.

“We know we’ve caused a divide in the photographic world. An iPhone, something interesting, and X-Pro II does not make you a photographer,” said Morton. “You can the same effects, but now you have to learn how to use a goddamn camera since we’re striking the filters from the app.”

Instagram will remain intact, but will no longer offer any filters, which will make #nofilter moot. Morton urges users to focus on making compelling images without having to rely on pseudo film grain.

“Besides,” said Morton, “We’ve got nothing on VSCOcam anyway.”