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35mm

The-Phoblographer-Infographic-on-Film-sizes

Inspired by Zack Arias’s video on film and digital sensor size comparisons, we decided to whip up a quick infographic for you on the different film sizes available in a friendly comparison. Think it’s cool to have a full frame 35mm sensor in your camera? Well consider the fact that you can get 645 (6×4.5) 6×7 film cameras for fairly cheap. Sure, you’ll have to pay for the film expenses, but you’ll also put more effort into you photos and have loads more keeper shots if you’re careful. Plus, you likely won’t upgrade your camera every couple of years.

As we show in the infographic above, 35mm film is smaller compared to everything else. In fact, 35mm film was originally invented to please consumers, not professionals. It was designed quite literally for novices but because the standard once people could deliver great work with it.

Sound familiar? It sounds a lot like the phone generation.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Get excited! It’s the weekend and there are loads of really cool projects that you can work on. Here is a list of some you can do with a 35mm lens. Go challenge yourself!

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Sigma 50mm f1.4 Art Lens Review images (1 of 13)ISO 4001-800 sec at f - 3.5

When it comes to getting a first prime lens, many of us on the staff reached for the 50mm f1.8–otherwise known as the nifty 50. But as time progressed, almost the entire staff also moved onto the 35mm field of view. In fact, many of my personal friends have too because 35mm lenses could arguably be stated to have a field of view of what you actually see in a scene. But this is one of the biggest debates for prime lens owners: 35mm or 50mm. In a recent video, DigitalRev tried to solve this debate. Kai makes some great points stating that one is a great travel lens and street photography lens and great for working with tight spaces, but when it comes to getting bokeh you’ll want to go for the other (obviously the 50mm).

And just in case you’re curious, you should check out our Sigma 35mm vs 50mm Art comparison. The video on choosing a 35mm or a 50mm lens is after the jump.

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film_blog_header

Whether you’re thinking about getting into film, or you’ve magically picked up an old SLR and are confused about how to use it, hopefully this little guide can steer you in the right direction.

The actual process of shooting film isn’t that much different from digital. Assuming you understand how exposure works, then the principle is exactly the same.

If you come from shooting RAW on a digital camera then really you only lose three features.

– Ability to change ISO

– Ability to change White Balance.

– *shocker* Ability to preview your shot

Editor’s Note: This post was originally published at Peter Stewart’s blog. It has been syndicated with permission.

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julius motal the phoblographer Loxia 35 mm Product Sample 2014.05.08 3

Fresh from Zeiss’s factory come two new lenses for Sony’s full-frame E-mount line of cameras: the Loxia 35mm f2 and the Loxia 50mm f2. Each lens is solely manual focus and has a clickless aperture ring and a depth of field scale. True to Zeiss’ tradition, the lenses have a metal body, and to meet the demands of the A7/R/S, they’re weather-sealed, too. They’ll get their first display at Photokina in two weeks.

Based on the tech specs, these lenses will be a boon for street photographers and photojournalists, and we bet that the 50mm in particular will work well for portrait photographers both outside and in the studio.

The 50mm f2 will be available in October for $949.99, and the 35mm f2 will be available towards the end of the year for $1299.99. Once we get the lenses in, we’ll be sure to review them for you.

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IbarionexPhoblographerFixedFocalTravel01

During two trips to Europe, I’ve decided to shoot primarily with a fixed focal length. During my first trip to Paris, I mounted a Sigma 30mm f1.4 lens on my Canon 60D and shot virtually all our travels with the equivalent of a 50mm focal length. For this trip to France, I have been shooting with a Fujifilm X100s which with its 23mm lens sports the equivalent of a 35mm focal length. Though I initially focused on the potential disadvantages, the reality was that working this simply has its benefits.

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