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Chris Gampat

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Photographers have just 7 days left to submit their photos to The 2014 EyeEm Awards. As the world’s biggest mobile photography award & exhibition, the EyeEm Awards give you the chance to win a trip to Berlin, get discovered by industry heavyweights and get published and exhibited. Submissions are free of charge.

The vision behind the 2014 EyeEm Awards is to give up-and-coming talents the chance to showcase their work and get discovered by some of photography’s most influential people. Jury members such as fashion photographer Rankin, former VII photo agency lead Stephen Mayes, Huffington Post’s photo director Anna Dickson, TIME Lightbox editor Olivier Laurent or The Phoblographer’s Editor in Chief, Chris Gampat, will judge entries and select the shortlist and winners.

The Awards consist of 10 categories that cover subjects as diverse as portrait, fashion, landscape, architecture or street photography, as well as more experimental styles such as visual storytelling and mobile post-processing. Submissions can be taken with any camera, but shots must be uploaded through the EyeEm app.

You can contribute your photos until August 1st. Head over to awards.eyeem.com for the details and get started by downloading EyeEm on your iPhone or Android phone.

About EyeEm: EyeEm is a thriving global photography community and marketplace designed for the photographer in all of us.

Editor’s Note: This is a sponsored post by EyeEm.

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Taken from our original post

The Phoblographer and BorrowLenses are teaming up to go vintage for an Instagram Giveaway! You have a chance to win a vintage medium format rangefinder camera: specifically the Fujifilm GSW690 II. This leaf-shutter, fixed lens aging beauty shoots 6″×9″ exposures on 120. You can also take home a $250 BorrowLenses.com gift certificate so that you can still rent something from the modern age.

Hit the jump for the rules.

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer NYCC New York Comic Con 2013 exports (67 of 84)ISO 1001-60 sec at f - 5.0

Cosplay photography is something that should be done right–it should be more than a snapshot of the costume that someone worked hours and hours on to get right. Conversely, it should also be something that you’ll be able to take pride in at the end of the quick session.

This guide is designed for convention goers–like those at Comic Con or Dragon Con. But some of the methods spoken about can be applied to different situations. If followed, you’ll produce images that are very portfolio worthy.

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Review: Sony A7s

by Chris Gampat on 07/25/2014

Chris Gampat the Phoblographer Sony A7s product images (1 of 8)ISO 16001-50 sec at f - 4.0

The Sony A7s has to be the single camera that will shift the megapixels race to the ISO stage. When it was first announced, it was billed as a low megapixel high ISO territory trailblazing camera. Then tests started to come out that confirmed this. Indeed, Sony’s 12MP full frame sensor is quite capable not only of delivering very clean high ISO results, but also pretty darned good RAW file versatility. But there is so much more to the camera than this.

The A7s also is one of the fastest focusing cameras that we’ve tested on the site–and for that reason its reliability as a tool in your daily life increases. The camera is a dream come true for many photojournalists, concert photographers, and videographers.

On the other hand, still photographers are bound to be disappointed somewhat by fewer megapixels and the lack of detail at lower ISOs.

But Sony delivered some Editor’s Choice award winning products in the A7 and A7r. Is the A7s worthy of the award too?

Editor’s Note: this review is based solely on a photographer’s point of view. We will post another article later on comparing this camera’s video output to the Panasonic GH4.

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Lots of pitches and emails come our way everyday, but it’s rare that something truly pulls me out of bed from my afternoon nap. And for that, we have to give ti to the Bouncelite. The Bouncelite is a brand new Kickstarter initiative aimed at creating a completely brand new type of flash modifier that makes some of the most efficient use of lighting that we’ve seen. It mounts onto the head of your flash and acts as a softbox but can also act as a bounce card at the same time. At the moment, it’s currently being targeted at folks who put the flash in their hot shoe; though it can surely be used with the softbox off camera. But for what it’s worth, photographers who want to use a flash off camera go for much larger flash modifiers and larger softboxes.

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All images by Giancarlo Rado. Used with permission.

“I’ve taken pictures for many years, my mother always told me that in her young years she was developing and retouching photographs in her cousin’s laboratory, and still colorizing portraits with special inks; so it was just a familiar tradition, which still survives in me even if I am a musician,” says Giancarlo Rado on how he got into photography. He explains that it’s like telling stories–and a story is what he’s telling in his series entitled, “Waiting for Summer.”

Toting around a Hasselblad SLR with a 80mm lens, Mr. Rado loves the square format. And when working on the series, he states that it’s like taking a portrait of a landscape. He believes in the existential idea that the earth, sky, and sea all connect along with ideals and feelings deeply involved in our minds when traveling to the beach during the winter. With that said, he often searches the beach looking for relationships that he thinks will evoke stories.

“I go to the beach mainly for the horizontal light that I know that soon or later will come. This light allows the evocation of shadows and situations particularly important for me,” states Mr. Rado. “I know very well the places where I shall go and sooner or later the expected situation will appear–like and astral conjunction of phenomena which may reflect feeling such as loneliness, fear, peace, quietness, and what else connected with the never fading border between interior and exterior world.”

Giancarlo’s photos evoke the sense of loneliness and indeed search for relationships. The series is after the jump.

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