Review: Fujifilm 16mm f1.4 R WR (X Mount)

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Fujifilm 16mm f1.4 review lead image (1 of 1)ISO 4001-125 sec at f - 6.3

The Fujifilm 16mm f1.4 is a lens that makes a lot of sense in the company’s lineup. Fujifilm’s strengths are with their primes, though their zoom lenses have started to become spectacular in the higher end category. However, very little else will appeal to the retro-smitten photographer like Fujifilm’s prime lenses–and the 16mm f1.4 is no exception. With nine aperture blades, a weather sealed body, metal exterior, a clicky aperture ring, and a depth of field scale that you can use for zone focusing, what’s not to like?

While you can surely start off by saying that it costs a heck of a lot, you can also point out to a single major flaw that we found with the image quality. But overall, that’s just about all that you can hate about this lens. Even then, it’s very easy to stay in love with it.

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Review: Fujifilm 16-55mm F2.8 LM WR (Fujifilm X Mount)

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Fujifilm 16-55mm f2.8 WR first impressions photos (2 of 25)ISO 4001-100 sec at f - 4.0

Fujifilm’s 16-55mm f2.8 LM WR is a lens that was missing from the company’s lineup for a little while, but has since surfaced. The equivalent of the more professional grade f2.8 general zoom lens, the Fujifilm 16-55mm f2.8 LM WR incorporates weather sealing, a real aperture ring, and a bunch of awesome features.

The lens features 14 weather seals, nine aperture blades, and three ED and Aspherical elements. For a standard zoom lens with a constant aperture it has a lot going for it–not to mention being in front of Fujifilm’s excellent X Trans Sensors.

For most photographers that use Fujifilm’s system professionally, this is a must-have. But for the rest of us, you’ll probably want to look elsewhere.

Editor’s Note: Fujifilm sponsors our Xpert Advice series that appears monthly on this site; but out reviews are still our own opinions.

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Review: Fujifilm 60mm f2.4 Macro (X series)

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Fujifilm 60mm f2.4 review product photos (5 of 8)ISO 4001-40 sec at f - 4.0

The Fujifilm 60mm f2.4 lens was one of the first that Fujifilm released when the X series system was announced. As one of the oldest in the system, it is also in the hands of many users. Marketed as a macro lens, its 90mm field of view also does a great job for portraits when needed.

Sporting a wide open aperture for f2.4 and 10 elements in 8 groups, the lens is further made better with nine aperture blades.

Sadly though, it’s very easy to deem this lens the jack of all trades and master of none.

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Panasonic GH4 Autofocus Speed Found To Be Close to the Nikon D4s

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Panasonic GH4 announcement photos (1 of 5)

As mirrorless cameras have improved over the years, so to has their autofocusing. Many companies claim that they have the world’s fastest autofocusing capabilities. For years, we’ve stated that Olympus is king in terms of speed but the new Sony A6000 has also really impressed us lately. But the Camera Store decided to put four of the top mirrorless cameras to the test on a dirt bike range. Plus, they also brought along the Nikon D4s.

The cameras put to the test were the Sony A6000, Olympus OMD EM1, Panasonic GH4 and the Fujifilm XT-1 as well as the Nikon D4s. They were all tested with comparable focal lengths at f4. In the end, they conclude that the D4s is still king but that the GH4 is close.

There are problems with the test though:

– At f4, more is in focusing with a Micro Four Thirds sensor than with an APS-C or full frame sensor. They were testing the lenses out at f4

– Panasonic lenses don’t focus as snappily on Olympus cameras and vice versa. This could help account for the findings with the OMD EM1.

– The Sony A6000 was tested with an Alpha adapted lens; not a native E-mount

– The D4s is significantly more expensive.

Despite these flaws in the non-scientific test, it’s still very much worth watching for the insight. Check it out below after the jump. Be also sure to check out our reviews of the Sony A6000, Fujifilm XT1 and the Olympus OMD EM1.

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Review: Fujifilm X-T1

julius motal the phoblographer fujifilm xt1 review-1

When my Editor-in-Chief asked if I’d like to review the Fujifilm X-T1, I responded with an emphatic, “YES.” Having worked with the X-E2 for several months and the X-A1 and X20 before that, I’ve become the Fuji lover both on staff and around my friends. The X-T1 has something of a traditional SLR design with the the viewfinder in the middle, as opposed to the left side, and all manner of dials along the top. It’s only slight larger than the X-E2, but it’s far more satisfying to use. While the core elements of the X-T1 are the same as the X-E2, there are several important factors that keep it comfortably above the rest of the crop.

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Shooting a Wedding with the Fujifilm XT1

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I had the honour of shooting my wedding yesterday with a pre production Fujifilm X-T1. It was a very special day for me, not only was it my 200th wedding, it was also my first wedding without a Canon in my hand.

I had the XT-1 since its launch on Wednesday and decided to leave my Canon Mk3 and Mk 2 at home yesterday when I went to my wedding. Instead, I used the Fujifilm X-T1 as my main camera and a Fujifilm X-E2 as my second camera. I am definitely sure that this is the first wedding in South Africa shot with a X-T1, the camera was only launched three days ago and there is only two in the country. It will be interesting to know if somebody else has photographed a wedding with the XT-1 since its launch.

Editor’s Note: This post was originally published on JC Crafford’s blog. It is being published here with permission.

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