This Canon USB Stick Looks Like A Miniature Canon IV Rangefinder

This novelty Canon IV rangefinder will store all your photographic memories.

Who doesn’t need USB sticks?! No one, we all need them. But let’s get real about them, most of ‘em are either poorly built or just plain eyesores. That said, every once in a while you come across one that is well built and looks great – and that is just the case here with Canon’s new Canon IV USB Stick. Continue reading…

Vintage Camera Review: Mamiya 6 Medium Format Rangefinder (120 Format, 6×6 Square Format)

The Mamiya 6 is a camera that I’ve lusted after for many years; and when the opportunity to get one with two lenses for an absolutely unheard of price, I knew that I needed to spring for it. As one of the few great compact interchangeable lens rangefinders that use medium format film, the Mamiya 6 is in my mind one of the most perfect square format cameras ever made. While some may pledge allegiance to Hasselblad and other to Bronica when it comes to SLR cameras, still other will stand by some of the best TLR options on the market that shoot 6×6 format. In many ways, I want you to imagine a Leica M series camera but bigger and plastic. On top of that, this camera is collapsible and has a few features to it that could be considered quirks but in other ways are fail safes.

If you’re the type of photographer that needs a compact medium format shooter the way that I do, then there is almost nothing better.

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The Voigtlander 40mm f1.2 is Now Available in Leica M Mount

The Voigtlander 40mm f1.2 lens in M mount is identical to it’s Sony FE variant, but rangefinder coupled

A little while ago, Voigtlander released a brand new Voigtlander 40mm f1.2 manual focus lens for the Sony E mount; but just recently they announced it for the Leica M mount. This lens is nearly identical optically to the Sony E mount version but the Voigtlander version is cosmetically different to accommodate more of the rangefinder crowd. Additionally, the M mount version is rangefinder coupled. Of course, this also means that you should ensure that your rangefinder can work well with lenses that focus down to that shallow of a depth of field. Of course, you could always zone focus too; but the point of having a lens like this is to shoot at f1.2.

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Yashica Electro 35: The Yashica Camera You Should Buy Today

The Yashica Electro 35 is something more like what many photographers were hoping for

One good thing that the heat of the Yashica digiFILM brouhaha has brought would probably be a renewed love or interest for the Yashica cameras of the previous decades. One such camera is the Yashica Electro 35, a rangefinder line that that is still sought after and loved by beginners and long-time film photographers today.

The Yashica Electro 35 GSN (chrome) and GTN (black) models have been particularly popular with the analog resurgence, but they were the last models introduced by Yashica in 1973. All the Electro 35 cameras came with a coupled and fixed f1.7 45mm lens. The Electro 35 GSN was particularly thrust into the limelight when it made an appearance as Peter Parker’s camera in The Amazing Spider-Man (2012).

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Useful Photography Tip #179: Why Shooting Landscapes With a Rangefinder Can Really Suck

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Medium Format and film rangefinders in particular seem like such a perfect package for going about and shooting landscape photos, right? Or if not, maybe you’ll want to tote along your Leica! But before you do that, you should note that that’s probably a really bad idea if you want to do things right. With digital, this can be easier because getting details in the highlights or shadows is as simple as moving a slider. If you’ve got burning and dodging skills that can be used in the darkroom, then you’ll also not really have a problem when it comes to printmaking. However, if you’re trying your hardest to get it right in camera, then you’re going to be working with a tripod, ND filters, and Graduated NDs.

And that’s where this all becomes a bad idea.

With a mirrorless camera that has an EVF or with a DSLR, you’ll be able to see exactly where the ND filter is covering in the scene. In most situations, photographers position graduated ND filters over the sky and expose for the shadows. But if you’re doing that with a rangefinder, you’re not going to be able to see what’s happening through the lens unless you’re using one of the newer Leica cameras with an EVF. So instead what’s going to happen is you’re going to put the graduated ND filter on in front of the lens and you’re not going to be 100% totally sure how much coverage you’re getting. You can make a guesstimate but that is as great as you’re going to do.

Instead, I tend to want to reach for SLR cameras and mirrorless cameras that have an EVF. Of course, this doesn’t mean that you can’t shoot a great landscape photo with a rangefinder. It’s just much tougher.

5 Fantastic 6×7 Medium Format Film Cameras to Create Beautiful Photos With

There are a number of photographers out there who consider the 6×7 format of medium format film to be the only really medium format type. Part of this has to do with the fact that it’s right in between small format (35mm) and large format (4×5). It’s quite a bit larger than 645 format and much larger than 35mm format. It can also prove to be very difficult to work with simply because you need to be super critical about your focusing.

So if you’re looking for a 6×7 format camera to work with, check out this list.

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Which One: Fujifilm X100F or Fujifilm X-Pro2 with Fujifilm 23mm F2?

Looking at specs one couldn’t help but notice that and X-Pro2 feature a lot in common. Both have Fuji’s new 24mp sensor, both are rangefinder inspired, both have hybrid optical and electronic viewfinders, and both have (or can have in the case of the X-Pro2) a 23mm F2 lens. So with all of this in mind one would not be that out of line to wonder which setup is the better option, and today we are here to answer that question.

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4 Rangefinder Inspired Digital Cameras For Those Tired of The DSLR Lifestyle

What does your camera look like? What does that style and appearance say about you as a person, as a photographer? It is not uncommon to care about what your camera looks like, though this aesthetic preference usually takes a back seat (as it should) to other more important issues with a camera, such as image quality, performance, etc. But assuming your threshold for desired performance is met, what style and design qualities are important to you in your next camera?

For many, the same old SLR/DSLR look and build is boring and uninteresting. Functional and practical, sure, but generally not the most stylish. Rangefinder cameras on the other hand, at least the latest models, have come into their own in terms of style and performance, leading many to ditch their SLR styled cameras in favor of smaller, lighter, and more stylish rangefinder inspired designs.

Let’s take a look at some of the best of these rangefinder inspired cameras that one may like to consider… Continue reading…