A Look at 5 Photographers Documenting Civil Rights Struggles

These photographers are doing the work we need to truly pay attention to.

In our 11 years, we’ve interviewed lots of photographers. But more importantly, we’ve stayed close to our photojournalism roots. Our platform has been used by many photographers to get the word out. Much of what documentary photography about these days is Civil Rights. It’s happening all across the world in various ways. There are stories at the top of the news every morning about it. But there are some that haven’t really been told as much. For Martin Luther King Jr.’s birthday, we’re counting down a few that we’ve featured.

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Josué Rivas Uses His Fujifilm GFX 100 to Tell Stories of Indigenous Folks

All images by Josué Rivas. Used with permission.

“Making images has allowed me to see people as full people,” says Josué Rivas in our interview. “We all carry light and also darkness, I’m always curious about the shadows in our stories. In my experience, when we are able to be vulnerable, then we see the light in ourselves and others.” These are some of Josué’s sources of inspiration. Beyond that, our interview with him delved into the necessity for diverse representation–an element he often explores. He also shared more details with us about how he uses his camera to further this endeavor, and how he found his way into photography.

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“Centralia” Uncovers the Survival of Indigenous People in Central India

Centralia is a docu-fiction photography project that sheds light on the little known conflict between the indigenous peoples of central India and the Indian state.

Whether you’re looking for a new photo book to add to your collection or simply want to support an impressive photography project, today’s featured body of work is worth checking out. Titled Centralia, this long-term, ongoing series chronicles Poulomi Basu‘s journeys deep into the forests of central India to reveal the little known conflict that has indigenous people fighting for their survival.

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Jarle Hagan’s Documentary Style Portraits of the Sami People of Norway

All images by Jarle Hagan. Used with a Creative Commons License.

Lots of documentary projects seem to simply do just that: document. But Jarle Hagan’s documentary portraiture goes a step beyond that as he’s previously demonstrated with his photo project involving Norway’s Sami – a protected indigenous people and the most northern dwelling indigenous people in Europe. Typically, just the idea of doing a documentary project on their lands just sounds tough.

To create the images, Jarle used the new Leica 50mm f1.4 Summilux lens on the Leica SL camera to create the portraits. Considering just how tough that camera has proven to be, it seems very much like the right choice.

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