Sample Gallery: Sony a7r III RAW Files Edited in Capture One

The Sony a7r III seems to have a sensor that allows for ultimate versatility

We’re currently in Sedona, Arizona with Sony and a number of other journalists using the Sony a7r III camera along with some of the company’s latest lenses. Additionally, I’ve been testing the Sony a7r III with the Profoto B1 and the Profoto A1. We’ve been shooting a number of landscapes, portraits, sports, and documenting decisive moments with this camera. Thus far, the Sony a7r III seems really fantastic as a mirrorless camera but there are still a few quirks. However, the good far outweighs the bad.

Continue reading…

Michelle Groskopf’s Street Photographs Use Flash to Tell a Story

All images by Michelle Groskopf. Used with permission,

Photographer Michelle Groskonpf is a fine art street photographer who shoots in a style and subject matter you don’t really see anywhere else. The LA based artist says she used to be a “creeper” but these days finds happiness in the small moments of intimacy. That’s very evident by her Instagram and she’s now on a mission to make her photos into a book. Michelle’s book is called Sentimental, and she likes to bill it as more of a monograph than a coffee table book. Michelle got her start in photography during some troubling times in her teenage years. And like many others, she found a way to creatively express herself through fine art photography. Her style combines street portraiture with bright flash that brings us all the details of a person’s face. Michelle believes that everyone, in their own way, is both important and urgent.

Continue reading…

The Professional Photographer’s Introduction to Wireless Flash for Amateurs

Like many photographers, I worked for a time as an assistant in a studio, where one of my most important tasks was to follow behind (or in front of, or beside) the photographer and make sure they didn’t trip over their PC cable, thereby unplugging the lights while simultaneously falling unceremoniously on their face.

A remnant of the same era where telephone operators manually plugged cables into long rows of connectors to complete a call, the PC connector is a long cord that attaches between the camera and a flash or strobe setup. The PC has always been a problematic solution. On one side is usually found a connector that’s the same as a 3.5mm headphone mini-connector, while on the other side is a coaxial cable comprised of an inner cable wrapped in a thin circular metal housing. The circular coaxial end of the cable plugs into a camera’s PC port, and the 3.5mm cable plugs into a lighting pack. Multiple packs could be strung together by a series of cables, and photographers needing a lot of space between themselves and their packs would often combine multiple extenders and drag the cables behind them.

Continue reading…

The New Phottix Juno Transceiver Flash Will Work With All Camera Brands

The brand new Phottix Juno can come with an Ares II transmitter for only $149.99

It’s been awhile since we’ve heard or seen anything from Phottix, but with Photo Plus Expo coming up next week we were bound to see something like the new Phottix Juno. The Phottix Juno is the company’s latest transceiver flash unit that gives photographers a pretty darn affordable option vs Godox and Yongnuo. This flash is fully manual and therefore works with Canon, Nikon, Sony, Fujifilm, Olympus, Panasonic, Pentax, etc. Though it isn’t revolutionary, it also has the highly coveted side tripod socket that lets you mount it to 1/4 20 mounts.

Continue reading…

The Phoblographer Answers: Why Does My Camera Meter Not Meter With My Flash?

One of the biggest problems that almost every photographer has with flash is that they don’t know how to meter with it unless you’ve had extensive experience. And so today’s questions comes from a place where it honestly shouldn’t be a problem but it is. The situation: you’re shooting with a flash connected to the hot shoe and the flash is in TTL mode. The camera meter says that you’re underexposed but the image isn’t–in fact it’s overexposed in your eyes. Why is that?

Continue reading…

The Strobist David Hobby Gives You Tips on How to Get Into Off Camera Flash Photography

At the Fujifilm Festival in NYC, we had the chance to pick the mind of David Hobby: otherwise known as the Strobist. He gave us a number of tips on how to get into flash photography if you’re just getting started. We always preface this with saying that off-camera flash is about thinking creatively with your subjects and your photos. You add an element and tend to do a lot more than just capturing a moment. Instead, it’s about creating something that isn’t there.

Continue reading…

The Profoto A1 is the Small Studio Light We’ve Always Wanted

Profoto has been making some very interesting moves lately, and with the Profoto A1 just being announced, photographers have what the company is calling the smallest studio strobe ever made. The Profoto A1 is a 76 watt second flash that can work in the hot shoe and uses its own Li-Ion battery. It’s partially because of this that Profoto says it can recycle up to four times faster than other on-camera solutions. Unfortunately, it’s only coming in Canon and Nikon TTL at the moment–which is a total bummer for those of us who use mirrorless cameras. That battery also helps because there is an Air remote built in–just like there is with every other modern Profoto light. There’s also a massive LCD Screen on the back.

The press release is after the jump; and we’re not quite sure what the official word is on pricing yet.

Continue reading…

This Nikon SB5000 Flash Survived More Dirt Than We’d Like to Admit

We’re currently on a press trip with Nikon trying out the new Nikon D850 in Bend, Oregon–and during the trip we did something with a flash that would probably make most photographers cringe. The image above shows off the Nikon SB5000 flash. Now, if you look at most flashes out there, what seems to be dominating the scenes are those cheap Chinese flashes from Yongnuo, Godox, etc. So with that mentality present, if something like what happened to this Nikon SB5000 flash happened to one of those, you’d probably just replace it. But you see, Nikon’s flash is significantly more expensive–but it easily survived being ground into the dirt and mud.

Continue reading…