Quick Tips on Getting The Most Out Of Your 85mm Lens While Shooting Portraits

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If you shoot portraits, an 85mm lens (or equivalent) should really be in your kit. 

85mm – THE classic portrait focal length. If you are just getting into shooting portraits, or maybe have been shooting on the wider end with a 35mm or 50mm lens, then shooting with an 85mm lens could be something you are looking for tips on. If that is the case, then this is the post for you as we will go over some helpful hints to getting the most out of your 85mm lens when shooting portraits. Continue reading…

Could This Be the Canon 85mm F/1.2 L II? I Doubt It!

I found an old posting at Velodramatic via some internet forums that didn’t seem to get any buzz. Granted, it is an old posting, but it still brings up a very big point. The 85mm F/1.2 L isn’t terribly old, but there are some issues with it: like slow USM. Now, I have the 85mm F/1.8 (one of my highly recommended lenses) and haven’t found that I needed to have Image Stabilization built in. However, the L version is quite a bit heavier and I could easily understand why someone would perhaps want it. It is used by wedding, portrait and other photographers.

Though I have my doubts about this concept being real, I consider this image rendering to be a huge fake because I highly doubt it would focus out to 70 feet. However, this would be a very interesting move for Canon because of the fact that the 85mm F/1.2 L is used often in cinematography in addition to some of the current favorites. Adding IS to it would make a bit more sense. If it has the other focusing modes that their new zooms and primes, then they would be trying to prep it for other uses. It would be a viable option against the Zeiss cinema prime that we had hands on with before, though it would also be very different.

Do you think this could really happen? Let us know in the comments below.

Clarification: the writer says the lens is a fake. But consider the trends that Canon’s technology is following and the way they are moving forward with their lenses. Features from the higher end lenses often trickle down to other ones.