Review: Canon 70-200mm F4 L IS USM II (Canon EF)

With the Canon 70-200mm f4 L IS USM II, photographers have a great option for travel photography.

When the Canon 70-200mm f4 L IS USM II was announced, I thought it would make for a fantastic travel photography lens; one that will appeal to enthusiasts quite a bit. Canon, after all, decided to do a revamp of the lens rather than the most minimal amount of effort they put into their f2.8 option. Though I’ve given Canon quite a bit of heat over the years, this new Canon 70-200mm f4 L IS USM II is where I’ll concede to them; they created a fantastic lens that is lighter than lots of telephoto prime lenses out there. With some solid autofocusing abilities, great image stabilization of over four stops, light weight, and good optics, I need to give Canon a lot of credit for the Canon 70-200mm f4 L IS USM II.

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Review: Sigma 24-70mm F2.8 DG OS HSM Art Lens (Canon EF Mount)

The Sigma 24-70mm f2.8 DG OS HSM Art Lens is fantastic: will you trade up for it?

One of the best pieces of news professional working photographers have heard in the lens world could be about the Sigma 24-70mm f2.8 DG OS HSM Art Lens. Unlike many first party options out there, it has optical stabilization built in which helps a lot at weddings, events, for portraits, etc. Those types of photographers will greatly appreciate this addition on top of the already fantastic optics. Speaking of those optics, Sigma has consistently hit the ball out of the park in our reviews, and I’m happy to say they’re pretty much going to do this same thing in this review. But I should warn you that Sigma’s zoom lenses, while good, aren’t their primes. Sigma’s prime lenses are better. So if you want the best of every focal length offered here, you probably won’t be satisfied until you go for their f1.4 primes instead. And like many of those other lenses, you can take the Sigma 24-70mm f2.8 DG OS HSM Art out into the rain due its weather resistance.

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Review: Lensbaby Sweet 80mm f2.8 with Composer Pro II (Canon EF Mount)

The Lensbaby Sweet 80mm f2.8 optic has been long overdue in some ways–a more modern lens with sharp elements, and overall high quality optics makes more sense when you combine them with higher resolution camera sensors. But of course, if you know anything about Lensbaby, you’re probably aware that nothing is really supposed to be incredibly, ultimately sharp. When used correctly, the Lensbaby Sweet 80mm f2.8 optic can be just that. It’s designed to be used in conjunction with the Composer Pro, which acts like a tilt shift mechanism when the focusing of the lens and the shifting of the Composer Pro are used together.

Overall, the Lensbaby Sweet 80mm f2.8 optic is one of my favorites along with the 50mm optic. But what the 80mm does is make both landscape and portraiture really fun again.

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We’ve Updated Our Canon 6D Mk II Review: The RAW File Versatility Isn’t THAT Terrible

Hi everyone,

We just updated our Canon 6D Mk II review to conform a bit more to our standard testing procedures. For years, I’ve tended to run all our cameras and lenses through Lightroom when it comes to testing simply because of the fact that it’s the industry standard. But within the past year, I’ve moved away from this in more favor of Capture One. I’ve also implored photographers to consider making the switch a number of times and now I’m getting asked for more tutorials on using Capture One instead of Lightroom. So of course, there is interest. And of course, Capture One has proven to me today how much of a better editor it is than Adobe Lightroom in regards to RAW file editing algorithms.

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Review: Canon 6D Mk II

I want to get something straight that not a lot of reviews are putting out there: the Canon 6D Mk II isn’t a bad camera, in fact for most people, it will be a pretty darned good one. But for the rest of us who are at a point where we are demanding more from our cameras and image quality, we shouldn’t even be looking at this one. In many ways, the Canon 6D Mk II is the modern Canon full-frame Rebel. What do I mean by that? Canon has squarely given the camera enough features to please the folks who just want to move up to full-frame and their current lineup of users. There’s nothing incredibly revolutionary about it and the folks at the NYTimes aren’t bound to write praises about it; but at the same time, it isn’t a terrible camera at all.

But in every single way, it isn’t something I’d recommend to any sort of working pro or semi-professional except for perhaps portrait photographers.

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Review: Canon 24-105mm f4 L IS USM II (Canon EF Mount)

Canon has always been a company that is a bit slower to change things, and so when the Canon 24-105mm f4 L IS USM II was announced, I was pleased to see that they did a number to fix many issues with the previous lens. With that said though, years have passed now and the Canon 24-105mm f4 L IS USM II more or less looks like every other option on the market. Some of the new welcome additions are the prevention of lens creep incorporated into the design, a lock to keep the lens locked in at 24mm, better weather sealing, faster autofocus, and less issues with image quality. For years, the previous version of the lens was my bread and butter option. While many photographers reach for the 24-70mm f2.8 lenses, I tend to go for the longer focal range option.

For only $1,099 you’re getting one of the best bang for your buck L lenses that Canon offers. At a more expensive price point than Sigma’s 24-105mm f4 DG OS HSM, you’re paying for weather sealing and the ability to lock the lens at 24mm to prevent it from extending when in your camera bag. that and less contrast in the images. But the Canon 24-105mm f4 L IS USM II’s main strength is in the versatility it offers the photographer.

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Which One?: Canon 6D Mk II vs Canon 6D Original Comparison

Be sure to check out our Canon 6D Mk II first impressions.

When you ask the question of Canon 6D Mk II vs Canon 6D there are bound to be a lot of other questions that come up. With today’s announcement of the new Canon 6D Mk II, lots of photographers are wondering whether or not they should upgrade. I personally own the Canon 6D original; and it’s been one of my favorite Canon DSLRs for many years now. Some of the biggest updates to the line include a vari-angle LCD screen and a new 26MP full frame sensor. But there are a number of other differences too.

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The Canon 6D Mk II Sports a Vari-Angle LCD Screen With No 4K Video

Be sure to also check out our Canon 6D Mk II hands on first impressions.

Rumors about the Canon 6D Mk II have been circulating the web for a while now; and today the camera is getting officially announced. The new Canon 6D Mk II is in many ways an incremental upgrade from the original Canon 6D in that it’s not doing a whole lot to reinvent the wheel. Canon is using a brand new 26MP full frame sensor at the heart with the ability to go from ISO 100 to 40,000. It can shoot at up to 6.5 fps and when using the 45 autofocus points near the center of the frame you’ll be able to photograph birds and other animals with relative ease. One of the biggest changes to the Canon 6D Mk II is the new Vari-Angle LCD touchscreen. The touchscreen works when trying to take photos in Live View and when you’re trying to navigate the menus. Despite all the improvements to the screen though, there isn’t 4K video present in the camera despite there being 4K timelapse abilities.

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First Impressions: Canon 6D Mk II

Yup, the Canon 6D Mk II is real–and I had the chance to play with it a while back. The new camera is an interesting upgrade that is bound to be a hit with Canon die hard fanatics and those who love DSLRs. But those of us who have moved onto mirrorless cameras or have been considering them may be just a bit disappointed. In many ways, the Canon 6D Mk II feels like the Canon 5D Mk III. The original Canon 6D, which I own, feels like a true update to the Canon 5D Mk II–and so this evolution only makes sense. Like the original before it, the Canon 6D Mk II isn’t really designed to be a workhorse camera the way that the 5D series have always been. However, there are a lot of features that will surely make it an appropriate secondary camera.

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