Irene Rudnyk Shares Her First Large Format Camera Experience

Sreenshot image from the video by Irene Rudnyk on Large Format cameras

Surely, anyone who’s a fan of traditional photography today has large format photography on his or her bucket list. Thankfully, we have a lot of online resources to feed this curiosity with, whether it’s about getting the right gear to get started or learning the entire shooting process. In one of her recent videos, natural light photographer Irene Rudnyk gets to have a go with this beautiful medium for the first time, with pretty amazing results.

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This Cool, Analog Dystopian World Gets Even Trippier With Blue and Cyan 3D Glasses

All images by Andrew Willis. Used with permission.

“My Honours project was a 6 minute experimental animation, but all the resources were captured on an assortment of film stocks and formats and much of the process was very experimental,” explains photographer Andrew Willis to us. We’ve featured his work on this website before as he’s got some fantastic Bleached Polaroids and this time around he went a lot darker. “The final result is a dark, dystopian landscape populated by weirdos and shady characters. It was more of an exercise in character and world building than trying to build some clear narrative driven plot.” Andrew explains that while the final destination for the work was always to be a short animated film, he shot all of the elements with the hope that the individual images would be strong enough to stand by themselves.

Andrew’s project is far different than anything else out there. He’s taken to embracing those old 3D red and cyan glasses you’d get with Disney Adventure magazine back in the 90s.

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Make Cyanotype Prints at Home with this Easy Tutorial

Feeling experimental with your images today? You might want to play around with making cyanotype prints, one of the oldest forms of photography which dates all the way back to the 1840s. It’s a really fascinating alternative printing method that produces a beautiful blue image from which it gets its name. The process is actually easy enough for you to try at home.

On a more technical note, cyanotype is a UV light-sensitive photographic process, which means you’ll have to do your exposures in full sunlight or with the help of a UV light box. You also need to prepare your materials in a darkroom or a dimly lit room. Making the exposure is actually as simple as putting an object over a taking medium coated with the UV-sensitive cyanotype chemicals. How long you should expose it depends on the intensity of the sunlight you’re working with.

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