Luigi Brozzi

Website

– What makes black and white photography so important to you?

Black&White photography has been for me a long, slow travel, and I feel it won’t ever end. My time as a photographer is spent for the most to fulfill the requirements my clients ask for, and to teach photography, so I never have as much time as I would to develop my personal projects, and although I have the immense luck to join job and passion, on the other side my head and my heart are more and more stuffed with thoughts and wishes I can’t carry on as I’d love to.

The professional side of my work is mainly carried on in colour, but the images I shoot for myself are mainly B&W, more and more as I progress along my road, an humblest one on my own little footsteps, but always keeping an eye to those who left us really powerful work. Black&White cleans my mind, wipes out every distraction and brings my vision right in the heart of things, of what surrounds us. I wish I could remember who once said something great: “reality is in color, but life is in black and white”. I owe him so much!

That’s all: lines, volumes, tones, light itself; all you’ll ever need to get straight into what you want to express. And at the end, it’s always you, that thing to express in your pictures.

I always shoot RAW, but with the monochrome setting in my camera when I shoot for myself, just like once when I used to load my tool with Tri-X or HP5; this helps me to keep in the B&W mood I want. I don’t think that in photography some way to shoot or refine your images can be better than another: what works best for you is the right way, never forget that is just a tool, there’s only you behind it.

Nevertheless, as almost every photographer does, I find the technical side of the Force absolutely fascinating, and I try to be well up-to-date in every aspect, and that’s mainly for two reasons: first, to be confident in my tools, so to make them not get in the way, and second, to be a single, well-oiled gear with it, the more technical stuff is learned by the heart and part of you, the more free you are to go straight to the point and see and feel things in the right way.Other common habits are shut-down back monitor, P or aperture priority mode, prime lenses and the most of times the maximum aperture available. Always one camera, one lens, I never switch lenses when I’m shooting: keeping a single vision teaches me every time something new. I’m a huge 50mm, real or equivalent, field of view fan, just every now and then I like to use a 35mm, and quite seldom an 85mm; my desert island lens is definitely an f/1.2 or f/1.4 50mm, this old pal can really do almost everything perfectly.A little gear goes a long way, especially today, modern cameras are extremely complete, most of times by far more than we need.


– What inspires you to create photographs?

I’m not, unfortunately, someone who can “switch” in every moment from ordinary life to photography, although I always carry a camera with me: I can’t stop to see and take the millions of pictures that life brings in front of us, and that’s a real joy, but I have to turn myself in “photography mode” to properly relax, expand my senses and translate what I feel in the images I can take; better said, to welcome and keep the photographs that come to us.. it’s them finding us, not us chasing them.

I love what happens and evolves in front of me, and most of all I love LIGHT, I’m constantly in loving search of it.So, the real, constant inspiration is life itself, a mood, a moment, something real and vivid happening around me, sometimes yelling at me, sometimes whispering; the more I’m able to be receptive, relaxed but really ready, the more there are keepers in the bunch.

– Why is black and white photography so important to our future in the art world?

Because, I think, if some wiseness still remains in mankind, or some more will grow as I hope it will, the real, pure essence of personal and artistic expression NEEDS to be cleaned from superstructures and brought back to strong, true contents; in this sense, B&W could be more and more a really effective path to follow.Shooting in B&W, anyway, has always been and will always be a serious, mature, richer way to create images, and that’s not a detail, don’t you think so..?

Adam Griffith

image

What makes black and white photography important to you?

The importance of black and white photography to me lies in the simplicity of the overall initial image itself while allowing for complexity to emerge through the combination of the composition, lighting, and subject that each photograph reveals. It takes away the colors that we are accustomed to seeing throughout our daily life and brings about a new way of “seeing” the world we walk through each day. 

What inspires you to make photographs?

Traveling through different countries and experiencing the variety of cultures inspires my photography. By living and working in the same environment day-in and day-out, the drive to photograph the world around me begins to subside and the mundane wins over, causing my desire to photograph to diminish. However, traveling to each new place fuels my want to grab my camera and shoot each passing moment. It is in street photography that I’m learning about the extraordinary in what we deem ordinary on a daily basis.

Why is black and white photography so important to our future in the art world?

Just as color can provide a sense of emotion to the viewer, black and white photography simply yields another contrasting emotion that might not particularly be felt through color. It is important to discern between the multitude of emotions that are created through photography in order to provide importance to each facet of this medium, whether black and white or color is the chosen format. Taking composition, lighting, and subject out of the equation, the importance of black and white photography in the art world can be based on this theory of emotion alone – pure, stark emotion.

image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image

Clay Benskin

image

Instagram

What makes black and white photography so important to you?

That’s how I see. 

What inspires you to create photographs?

Life 

Why is black and white photography so important to our future in the art world?

It just is.

image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image

Ian Pettigrew

Website

What makes black and white photography so important to you?

It’s the truth. Simple as that.

What inspires you to create photographs?

An undeniable urge to make art. Its uncompromising, and unrelenting. Its horrible sometimes.Its consuming.

Why is black and white photography so important to our future in the art
world?

BECAUSE BW is uncompromising. Its the truth, its life stripped away. Its the bare essentials.

Claudia Bordeleau

image

Website

What makes black and white photography so important to you?

Black and white photography is timeless. Its communication at is finest, a simple way of transmitting the forms that shape our thoughts without interference. Information is available directly without any distraction, without any mood or sensation created by color. I can compose to show only what I experience in  terms of light. I want others to see my truth, one I can create and that isn’t their usual.

What inspires you to create photographs?

The concept that there is no of present nor future, that I can captures the way I see light, patterns and shapewithout any context or reason inspire me.

I don’t want to show what is the real world, I want to show what’s happening while we aren’t paying attention, that the light can be the only subject of attention.

I like to show the details that shape our life on a day to day basis, thing that we aren’t usually looking at.

Why is black and white photography so important to our future in the art world?

Art is changing fast but one thing remain for sure: we want authenticity and truth.

Sure this can be obtained with color but black and white will always be a big winner when it comes to preserve memories and transmitting emotion because everything looks simple yet beautiful at the same time.

The future of anything lies in its past, so but continuity black and white perpetuates what was once a technicity into a stylistic choice. In other words: “Less is more”.

image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image

Jorge Miño aka Raskolnikov

Website

Flickr

What makes black and white photography so important to you?

It is difficult to explain but more than probably the fact that most of the photographs that have really impacted me from the masters are in B&W. I read from one of them that when you photograph someone in color you get his/her dress but when doing in B&W you get his/her soul. When I first saw one of my all-time favorite photo: Sally Man – Candy cigarette (https://theredlist.com/wiki-2-16-601-799-view-existentialism-profile-mann-sally.html) I was completely mesmerize by the expressiveness and all the story behind her eyes and behind the whole image. So, definitively B&W is getting more and more important to me because you can be even more expressive with the message you want to share with the audience. If one day I´m able to accomplish my real goal, which is to see someone crying in front of one of my photographs I´m convinced that that photograph will be in B&W 🙂

What inspires you to create photographs?

Almost 10 years ago my cousin, show me a portrait photography that she took of my daughter after she had lots of fun surfing. Since that day I´m more and more in love with what photography offers us as an almost unlimited mean to express ourselves.

Why is black and white photography so important to our future in the art
world?

Art=emotion – So this is a simple question to respond. B&W Photography is in my opinion much more expressive so, much more capable to transmit and generate emotions so, it will always be closer to art. I can not conceive the future of art without B&W photography.

Milo Hess

Instagram

FolioHD

Facebook

What makes black and white photography so important to you?

BW photography because it strips away all the unnecessary layers of distraction allowing the viewer to really look at what is going on. Not in a cursory nice color…what App did you use? kind of way but texture, light, shadow and most of all content and expression.  In a meat and potatoes…. less is more kind of way. Thinking about it I was brought up in a traditional bw darkroom and that’s a hard habit to break.

What inspires you to create photographs?

Inspiration for me is more like “ I will press the shutter when I see something that grabs me” to record that moment in time. It’s not usually preconceived. I create photographs the same way I would create art. It’s  to be creative… whether using a camera, digital design tool or traditional paint brush. Its the basic need to create..whether for myself or on assignment. Think we are influenced by visuals around us….subliminally. I guess since I have a design background and really have been taking photos from a young age it just comes naturally.My dad was a huge amateur photographer and probably inspired me to just “do it”

Why is black and white photography so important to our future in the art
world?

Black and white photography was the forerunner.. It has a purity about it. People always think of the bw photos of the masters as real photography…as art. It’s always going to be back to the future regarding this genre.. it’s not going away.

Robin Wong

Blog

FB Page

What makes black and white photography so important to you?

Black and white photography works predominantly well for street photography, which I do frequently on the streets of Kuala Lumpur. Taking out the colour instantaneously removes unnecessary distraction, creating a simpler outcome with more emphasis on the content of the photograph; the main idea, message and the story in it. I strive to accomplish simplicity in my photography, thus black and white greatly enhances that approach. Further to that, I shoot street portraits, both environmental and close up people shots, hence the black and white amplifies the human emotion and any expression that are conveyed in my images.

What inspires you to create photographs?

In contrary to most photographers who often seek inspiration from something big and extra-ordinary, I find inspiration to shoot in the smallest and most ordinary of things in our daily lives. I think there is beauty is the subjects that are surrounding us, if we allow ourselves to see them and we do not have to go far to find strong, compelling photography content. It may be something as simple as the friendly greeting smile of a stranger I have met on the street, or a young girl helping a blind man to cross the street. I find satisfaction and urge to capture just that one slice of reality into my images, and document the beauty in ordinary things that I see. 

Why is black and white photography so important to our future in the art world?

Black and white itself is a powerful and lasting culture within the world of photography since the very beginning. Therefore, black and white should not be categorized as just one genre in photography, it is a definitive photography identity that transcends all genres of photography. Consequently, black and white presence is significantly timeless and should be preserved as such in the world of art. 

Matthew Seratti

Website

What makes black and white photography so important to you?

Black and white images are the best way for me to capture what it feels like when I take a picture. The mood and emotion I felt are “why” I took the picture at that exact moment and black and white images remove the distraction of color. While I enjoy color images from others, when I’m out on my own taking pictures I’m not attracted to bright or complementary colors, I’m attracted to shadows, perspective, moods, and contrasts.

What inspires you to create photographs?

I am inspired to take photographs by my own dreams; I tend to have vivid, epic dreams and am often disappointed to wake up and find out they are not real places or experiences. When I’m out photographing I try to find situations that recreate the disconnectedness of dreaming and I start to feel I am a spectator watching the world. Capturing this feeling in the camera, as much as possible, is what drives me to continue to take pictures. 

Why is black and white photography so important to our future in the art world?

Black and white photography, while usually thought of as part of a continuum with color, however it is a separate medium in my mind. Black and white photography requires different skill sets and techniques. Black and white vs color is like the comparison of watercolors to oils. They both create paintings but are different mediums. It is for this reason that black and white will not ‘fade away’ or be lost to color images. It is simply its own genre and represents a specific part of the art world. It has a rich history and it continues to present a certain method of communicating art as much as any other. 

Seth Duimstra

Website

What makes black and white photography so important to you?

Black and white photography just speaks to me more than color. Theres a character to it that is timeless and to me you’re able to see the focus of the image much better verse being distracted by the additional colors.

What inspires you to create photographs?

I feel that I see things/people differently than others and I just want to share this with others, like a glimpse through my eyes.

Why is black and white photography so important to our future in the art world?

As said before Its timeless, photography has changed so so much over the years and continues to change but that “staple” of black and white imagery is still here and strong.. its the roots of all this and it still holds on. There’s something to be said about that.

Iwona Pinkowicz

image

Website

Instagram

What makes black and white photography so important to you?

Black and white photography plays a big part in my creativity as a street photographer. Even though I shoot in both black and white and colour I often choose the former to emphasise the emotions of the subject or highlight the beautiful light, shadows and shapes that cities provide. Removing distractions that colour can sometimes bring into an image allows the viewer to focus on the subject more. Without the choice of shooting in black and white, I wouldn’t always be able to highlight what it was that trigged me to press the shutter and capture a specific scene or subject.

What inspires you to create photographs?

People! I love people and being around them; this is why I fell in love with street photography from the moment I stepped out on my first photo walk. Being able to capture life around me is a wonderful thing; it gives me purpose in life. I hope that future generations will review my work and learn more about the time we live in now.

Why is black and white photography so important to our future in the art world?

Even though colour photography has become more accessible than ever before, I believe it is still crucial to shoot in black and white. Nothing will replace the classic and timeless look and feel of black and white photographs. As we all see the world in colour, creating black and white imagery gives us a chance to see the world in a different way.

image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image

Nicholas Goodden

image

Website

Street Photography London Blog

What makes black and white photography so important to you? 

It’s important to me as managing black and white tones takes real skill, more than just pressing “desaturate” in Photoshop. 

 Although it could be said that anything looks better in black and white, a carefully thought and crafted black and white photo has an effect on people I can hardly see equaled by anything in colour. 

 I think like in any creative pursuit there will be poor examples of course. Too often photographers don’t get that it’s not just black and white but a very subtle but extensive range of tones between black and white. So they get a bit heavy handed in Photoshop or Lightroom. Pushing the contrast too far, playing around with levels a bit excessively. The result is a loss of detail in the tonality. The shot loses its richness.

Although most people say the camera is just a tool and won’t make you a great photographer, I still have a belief that anyone who becomes great at what they do will want the best tools. 

Did you ever meet a chef who wouldn’t want sharp knifes? Or a racing driver who wouldn’t want the best car to compete with? The reason I say this is that I have, like many photographers, had the opportunity to work with a range of cameras. Today I shoot my black and whites in-camera, I never convert and not all cameras produce the same quality of black and whites. I can hear many probably thinking I’m crazy but I think post-processing should be avoided as much as possible to avoid any loss. 

The camera and lens combination I currently use produce results I am very satisfied with and I just don’t spend any more time in photo editing software. More time is allocated to shooting which is all for the best.

In the early years of my photography I would convert colour to black and white, I would play around with levels, contrast, highlights and shadows… But increasingly until last year I moved away from that to the point of where I am today and I think I produce better black and whites than I ever have.

It stems from the fact the shot is created with black and white in mind. I press the shutter seeing the shot in black and white. It makes no sense to me to see a shot in colour, compose it as you would a colour shot… and then convert it.

… 

What inspires you to create photographs?

My adult life has been spent working both on my photography and in a 9 to 5 office job. Photography is freedom. It allows me to be myself and show people how I see the world. Some photographers really focus on having a message, a meaning in their photography.

For me it’s a lot simpler. I want to document our times and create something beautiful which others find beautiful too. The search for perfect aesthetics I guess is my inspiration.

Having said that, I’m sure a shrink could reveal a lot about me from what I shoot. Isn’t that the case for all photographers?

Maybe a small part of me wants something to live on after I die (in many many years), photography gives me a purpose.

… 

Why is black and white photography so important to our future in the art world?

 

That’s a tricky question to answer to be honest. I may be wrong but there seems to be a slight preference from photographers and the public toward black and white as a whole.

I recently posted a survey on Twitter and of the few thousand people who took part, 62% said they preferred black and white.

It depends what your personal motif is for creating photographs I guess. I can’t see people ever not having a choice between colour or black and white, can you?

I create work in a very selfish way, I do it for me and no one else. If people like what I do it makes me very happy but equally if they don’t, well that doesn’t really bother me.

image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image

Matt Hill (NSFW)

image

Website

National Parks at Night

Instagram 

Twitter

What makes black and white photography so important to you?

Black-and-white photography is a challenge to the viewer to regard the image differently from color photography. It’s never an accident – it’s a signal of intent.
The ubiquity of color photography has a created dichotomy. On one hand, it’s incredible that photography is accessible and fun for anyone with a smartphone (or camera). On the other hand, with near-universal access, there is no scarcity to photography whatsoever anymore – at least in its digital form. So how does one begin to express a personal belief that their photography should be considered as special? Though differentiation. And B/W is one difference.
Granted, making a photo black-and-white can be as easy as an Instagram filter. And for some it’s an act of mimicking nostalgic memories from heir grandparents or parents. But for me, I grew up on TMAX, XP2, ILFOPAN, FP4, HP5 and many other variations of film. That is, until I was taught how to properly shoot XP2 by photographer John Ehrenclou and used it almost exclusively until I bought a Nikon D700. And even then I was immediately attracted to Nik Silver Efex Pro because it provided immediate access to a palette of B/W options and tweaks to make the looks I always wanted. Kismet. I still use it to this day. 

When I consume photography, I am drawn to those who have strong compositional skills, great tonal range and demonstrate a mastery of their craft or a passion to fail exquisitely. More often than not, I find those characteristics in B/W images.

Finally, I believe color photography is too real. It’s easy to pass by quickly because it resembles what we see every waking moment with our looking orbs. And unless you are a total master of color, light, composition and moment, your photos are likely to be unregarded. Or, you exaggerate color, saturation and other things so much that it departs from reality in a way that is (I think) more commercial More plastic

My decision to create in monochrome is not made from fear of not being noticed, however, it’s a choice to move towards asking viewers to set aside reality for a moment and enjoy my view of that moment.
A strange addendum to this thought is that I am peculiarly focused getting everything done in-camera. I don’t like digital manipulation. The most I do is stacking for star trails of some rare HDR to bring highlights under control in an urban nightscape. And dusting. Always dusting. Sigh… I am not so good at keeping lenses and sensors clean.

What inspires you to create photographs?

it is 100% selfish. I do it to please myself. I am happy when I am creating.
I also create photos for the opportunities to be wholly present. My waking life is fragmented. I am a tech junkie, lifelong student of marketing, social media addict, big consumer of streaming films and television, gamer, husband, cat owner, reader and more… And all of these things I love are competing for my attention. When I set out to make night photography, I can set aside all of those things for a few hours and just be present. It’s the gift of focus, and the pun is intended.

Being able to be singularly attentive to one action is, frankly, something I want a lot more of. So I am slicing out some time to make something that is singular to my set of beliefs, technical abilities and curiosity. It’s a bonus if someone else may also enjoy the results.

Why is black and white photography so important to our future in the art world?

To continue to define a line between the common and uncommon.
And also, I hope that it continues to promote thinking about finishing your work. About putting time into thinking about what the ideal final form of your art. For me, I am exploring Carbon printmaking and electrophotography. Both use carbon as the medium, and the results or about as permanent as art can be.
I hope that others are also exploring more than simply putting JPGs on the internet. A little scarcity goes a long way – don’t be afraid to undershare your best work. Be choosy and find the right (smaller) group of people that really, really dig it.

image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image

Gretchen Robinette (NSFW)

image

GRETCHEN ROBINETTE Photographer

Tumblr

What makes black and white photography so important to you?

Black and white photography is what first inspired me to pick up a camera, shooting 35mm film. It felt like I could create my own world by removing the color, yet still remain rooted in reality, not fantasy. Unlike people who learned photography from the internet, but I took an entire semester course called The Zone System, formulated by Ansel Adams, that teaches you how to see every color, in any temperature, or type of light, as a specific shade of grey on the Zone System scale of 1 thru 10, with 5 being middle grey. With this system, you decide before you shoot, exactly which zone you want each element in a scene to be, picking the exposure for the shadow fall off, then processing the film with a specific temperature for the highlights. This also continues on to the printing, which is super tedious and nerve racking if you don’t actually obsess over this stuff. Ansel Adams said once that you only truly know the Zone System when you can put your toast in the correct zone everyday, so I of course had to do this. With digital however, you are really only concerned with Zones III thru VII. All of this analysis was really what taught me the most about seeing and creating images. Even though I don’t use this anymore, I still unconsciously consider it when I shoot, and it is really the basis of understanding color as well.

What inspires you to create photographs?

Some times I specifically go out to make photos, but other times I just see a scene or moment and without thought, am inspired to photograph it. I’m not sure if it always is inspired, but I have found if I focus on a specific idea, or theme in my head, I’ll start seeing it everywhere, and when I see it, I know and just immediately shoot. Only recently have I started setting up shoots and posing people, but for years I did more candid, street, or documentary style, which is mostly inspired by light and elements just coming together.

Why is black and white photography so important to our future in the art
world?

If you really want to understand light and how it affects skin tone, the composition of a scene, the entire mood or meaning within an image, you have to understand how to see without the influence of colors. I love color photography (now although I used to hate it) but some images you can strip away the amazing vibrant colors, convert to black and white, and what do you have? A mediocre composition. I’m pretty sure a good portion of the Instagram stars shooting everything in lemon yellow or all pastels, would have a difficult time creating great images if they were forced to leave the crutch of color. Like, try creating an outstanding image of fall leaves in black and white, with tonal separation between each different leaf color, where the leaves still pop. An exception though, Thanksgiving turkey. Turkey in black and white, yuck. I praise whoever can make a turkey look appetizing without color. Black and white is important to photography just as understanding human emotions are. The human eye can be distorted by color, but the emotions are what remain the same.

image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image

Jamie MacDonald

image

Website

What makes black and white photography so important to you? 

Black and White photography is important to me because it makes me focus on ALL the components of an image. I see light, texture,shape and patterns more easily when I am not distracted by layers of color.

What inspires you to create photographs? 

Life is too damn short! And so many people rush through every day to make it to the next and never slow down enough to be amazed and the world they pass by. It is my drive to create images from those moments many would rush through, show I can show them why they need to slow down and enjoy this brief ride through life.

Why is black and white photography so important to our future in the art world? 

Black and White photography is important to our future in the art world because as technology advances it will become too easy to get lost in the world of brilliant colors and 3d shapes and miss out of the things that make black and white photography so beautiful. Those things being: Light as the subject, texture and shape to create a sense of feel, and contrasts and patterns to evoke visual stimulation. I think too much “hi-def and 3d color” will eventually numb our senses and make us less in tune to simple beauty.

image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image

Mike Andrews

image

Instagram

What makes black and white photography so important to you?

I felt an intrinsic link to black and white photography from a young age, stemming from an exhibition of Henri Cartier-Bresson’s work that appeared in Edinburgh’s Gallery of Modern Art. Like so many others, I was drawn to the aesthetic he created and how his use of monochrome allowed the viewer to focus on tiny details within the image, or the purely human element, without distraction. 

There’s a transgressive quality to a gritty, contrasty black and white shot that colour cannot match. Indeed, in a colourful and vibrant world, reducing an image or scene back to monochrome can tell a much more blunt yet textural story. A Thai street food market, a Scottish arts festival or a busy Parisian neighbourhood can all be drawn into sharp focus through black and white photography, without the potential for unnecessary clutter within the image. Simultaneously, it’s unforgiving and requires composition skills to be on-point otherwise the end result can look like nothing interesting at all. 

What inspires you to create photographs?

Taking time out of my working day (I work as a researcher for a not-for-profit organisation through the week) to shoot some street in and around Edinburgh is, for one, the ultimate stress reliever. Even just spending 30 minutes looking through the viewfinder of my camera to try and ‘nail the shot’ leaves me feeling energised and clear headed.

Also, the idea of continual improvement is central to my craft. I very much see every session with my camera as an opportunity to better what I did the day before. Whether I achieve this is actually not the point – it’s about putting in the effort and improving my overall skillset with the camera. I just spend every day trying to make one image as good as Josef Koudelka’s work – inspiration enough, in a way, even if I never get there.

Finally though, I’m inspired by the people and events around me. Sometimes this is my wife, sometimes it’s my friends, sometimes my parents, and sometimes utterly mundane events which, without my drive to make a great image, would be totally boring. Making something out of sheer boredom has to be one of life’s little pleasures!


Why is black and white photography so important to our future in the art world?


This is an interesting question because I don’t consider myself any form of expert on black and white photography, never mind art as a wider concept. However, in simple terms I think black and white photography remains one of the most direct ways to convey the best and worst of the world we live in. From stunning monochrome still life photos of plants and flowers to horrific images of war torn countries, black and white always has an ability to cut through and speak straight to our innermost feelings. All this, despite ‘missing’ colour. I think that’s pretty amazing.

image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image

Mark Miller

image

Twitter

Instagram

What makes Black and White photography so important to you?

Black and white photography is important to me because it helps create a timeless image. It is also a tremendous way to capture emotion and create a dramatic photo. I love how you can accentuate lighting and shadows using black and white as well. I believe that color only distracts from the emotions captured in a persons eyes and expression. To me B&W helps draw the viewer in and feel what the person in the image is feeling at the time. There is nothing more powerful than evoking emotion in someone through an image that I’ve created. 

What inspires you to create photographs?

 People and places inspire me to create photographs. I love to capture images the way I see the world and share it with others. I truly enjoy the creative process involved and it helps me see and appreciate the world around me. I enjoy seeing the reaction people have when I present them with the images I captured for them from a wedding, or portrait session. Being able to bring joy to someone and capture a moment in time through the work that I’ve done inspires me everyday to keep doing what I do. 

Why is Black and White Photography so important to the art world?

 Black and White photography is and always will be important to the art world. When you strip everything down to the basics of how we see and feel; black and white still captures drama, emotion, and light. Black and white allows one to focus on the composition and lighting without distractions from color or hues of light. It’s also a great way to accentuate the patterns and lines through composition. If you want to create a powerful and timeless image you can’t go wrong with black and white!

image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image

Jennifer Colucci

image

website

What makes black and white photography so important to you? 

Black and white is important to my music photography because of the ever-changing, uncontrollable and intense stage lighting conditions at concert venues. You don’t know what to expect from concert to concert. It’s exciting and fun, yet challenging and unpredictable. Venues are generally dark. When there is light, you often have to battle with red, blue and green spotlights that cause loss of detail in your photographs. The solution for much of my concert photography has been shooting in black and white. 

What inspires you to create photographs? 

My career inspired me to start taking photography seriously. Traveling, being surrounded by excellent photographers and taking pictures along side of them and creating memories during my travels all played a role in inspiring me to want to shoot more. From there, I developed my skills and continued to observe what goes into being the type of photographer I wanted to become. 

Why is black and white photography so important to our future in the art world? 

Black and white photography is important to the future of the art world because it brings you back to the basics. It has a classic, nostalgic/timeless look that pays homage to the past. No fancy lighting or distracting colors to take away from the details in the composition of the photograph. It’s versatile, yet dramatic.

image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image

Megan Crandlemire

image

Website

What makes black and white photography so important to you?

I view the world from a spiritual perspective.  All that I “see” is an illusion, a reflection of my inner life, whether I am conscious or unconscious of all that makes up my inner being.  Black and white is important to me because it simplifies the illusion for the moment captured, strips it down to light and dark allowing me to feel and explore those shades of gray after the moment has passed.…

What inspires you to create photographs?

Photography is a treasure hunt for creativity and perspective which I’m inspired to gather more of every day. Because I feel that our entire experience of life is in constant motion and change, including the objects we observe, every moment is unique.  To capture a fleeting moment is exciting, and the ability to look back on a photograph and notice what I could not perceive, or give my full attention to, in the present moment is a gift.  …

Why is black and white photography so important to our future in the art world?

Black and white photography is elegant, raw, and personifies life in shades of gray. Nothing in our illusion can be taken at face value; there is always a different perspective to explore and what is true today may not be true tomorrow.  Black and white photography offers an important contribution to the art world by freezing moments in motion with our most basic building blocks of life: light and dark.

image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image

Luc Kordas

image

Website

Instagram

What makes black and white photography so important to you?

Black&White makes photos look special. I guess most of photographers of any kind will agree that what we’re trying to do with our work is makereality look more interesting than it really is.Black&White is great for that. It’s important for me because in spite of my fascination for colors that constitutes more than half of my work now, I still thinkb&w photographs are simply stronger.

What inspires you to create photographs?

Light

Why is black and white photography so important to our future in the art world?

It is important and will continue to be so not only because photography has always been deeply rooted in black&white aesthetics, for a long time the only one there was before color entered the scene,but also because so many of us grew up and were inspired by looking at the work of giants of photography.Black&White is synonym for classic in most genres of photography, be that street, portraits, fashion or documentary.

image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image

Donna Rocco

image

Donna Rocco’s Website 

instagram 

twitter

What makes black and white photography so important to you?

I love the drama of black and white images, and how they bring a
different feeling to the story. There is an amazing quality of
timeless in black and white photography. Shapes and shadows, lines and
textures. Black and white focuses your attention on the subject and
interaction within the frame. I loved shooting with Polaroid
positive/negative film. Making the exposure and waiting for those
precious seconds to expire, before you could pull back the positive,
and swipe it with the clear coating stick, then turn your attention to
preserving the negative. Photography has always been for me a labor of
curiosity and passion.

What inspires you to create photographs?

Life inspires me to create photographs. I’ve been passionate about
photography since my grandfather gave me my first camera at nine. That
camera changed my life, and the way I look and relate to the world.
Photos I create are bits of memories and history. Preserving places,
events and people with the camera gives me a great sense of joy and
connection to what is around me.

Photos provide the viewer an opportunity to trigger a visual moment of
time after the moment is gone. Each of us look at a photos and feel
and remember. We feel for a longing of a time gone by, or for a memory
that will be created again, and so a tradition is born. For better or
for worse, not every photo is beautiful, and neither is every memory.

Why is black and white photography so important to our future in the art world?

Black and white images are relevant and important in so many ways.
They keeps us connected to history, and to the aesthetic quality of
light and shadows. They provide a dreamy memento and remind us all of
where the connection of science and art began. The art world is all
about history. Finding ways of interpreting the past to allow for new
entries into the ever expanding encyclopedia of art.

image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image