The Psychology of Creative Wedding Photography

Photo Essays is a series on the Phoblographer where photographers get to candidly speak their mind about a specific subject or project of theirs. Want to submit? Send them to editors@thephoblographer.com.

All images by Travis and Nina Tank. Used with permission. Be sure to also follow them on Instagram.

Something that I have spent the last few years trying to perfect in wedding photography is creating moments. Raw, real emotion is actually very difficult to achieve when you have a semi-stranger in your face expecting you to model. I have found there to be a significant difference in what sets photographers apart… there are ones who create moments and some that simply capture them. While yes we are all technically “capturing” moments, photojournalism in its purest form doesn’t tend to lend itself to the creative imagery that couples want or hire us for.

Those laughs that you see, the smiles and the people who look like they are having a good time are actually having a good time and laughing with us. This is the reason why few photographers seem to have more stiff imagery in their portfolio than authentic emotions. The good news? It only takes a simple switch in your mindset to completely change the way you view yourself as a photographer and how you capture any subject on the other side of your camera.

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On the Creative Thought Process Behind a Photograph

Photo Essays is a series on the Phoblographer where photographers get to candidly speak their mind about a specific subject or project of theirs. Want to submit? Send them to editors@thephoblographer.com.

All images by Bryan Minear. Used with permission. Be sure to also follow him on Instagram.

In today’s world where we are constantly bombarded with photos of spectacular locations, it takes nothing to pull up a location search for an area you are visiting, find the shots that you want to take, and go shoot the same thing that a hundred people before you have taken. But that doesn’t mesh with me. As an artist, I hold my personal creative vision above all other things. It far surpasses the gear that I use as well as the locations that I visit.

The majority of the personal work that I shoot, I do so within 15 miles of my house. And I don’t live in a particularly “epic” location that is known for its scenery (i.e. the PNW or Cali). But even though I only live in the midwest, I still get to be an artist. I just have to try harder and put a ton of work in to my craft. A lot of that comes down to scouting my locations in advance, and waiting to shoot at the perfect time, with just the right combination of weather and light to add that dynamic mood and interest. I’m not saying that taking the iconic photos is bad, but it can put you in a rut where you are only going through the motions.

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Soviet Swing: An Essay by Daniel Zvereff

Photo Essays is a series on the Phoblographer where photographers get to candidly speak their mind about a specific subject or project of theirs. Want to submit? Send them to editors@thephoblographer.com.

All images and text by Daniel Zvereff. Be sure to also follow him on Facebook and Instagrm. This post was originally published here.

Suspended over the impossibly steep slopes and down into the valley of Chiatura, countless steel cables twist across the sky like a web of indiscernible dimension. A gruff man, red faced and smoking a cigarette, ushers me into a steel box hanging from the cables, then closes the door and locks it from outside. Within the cable car there are no chairs, just rudimentary holes cut into the steel plate, their edges rusting beneath a thin veneer of blue spray paint. I poke my head out in time to see the man approaching a box on the wall nearby, he presses something within and rings a bell notifying an operator above that a passenger is ready to ascend. Immediately, the cable car lurches into motion and I am lifted, swinging slowly up into the sky.

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Chicago: A Personal Photo Essay

Photo Essays is a series on the Phoblographer where photographers get to candidly speak their mind about a specific subject or project of theirs. Want to submit? Send them to editors@thephoblographer.com.

All images and text by Ashlin Wang. Be sure to also follow him on Instagram.

Nikon F100, Sigma 28mm 1.8, Tamron 45mm 1.8,
Kentmere 100 and 400 B&W films, Kodak gold 200
Home processing for B&W and local lab for Kodak gold
Scanned on Pakon f-135+

A week before the trip I didn’t know I would be going. I had thought I asked for a day off and ended up with a week. So how do you fill that time when there are not any priorities? Make a trip to Chicago. I drove from KC to St. Louis for a concert,then stayed the night at a rest stop, (wrote about that here.) and finally ended up in Chicago with little clue of what I would be doing.

I had this vague perspective of this city from the time I visited with my family years ago, I had mostly forgotten what that had been like, what I had seen, and only remembered Chicago Pizza, the words, not what they implied. I had even forgot the existence of that popular bean. The only thing I really knew was two of my friends lived there and that that would be a starting point.

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(NSFW) Beauty in Simplicity: an Ode to Minimal Black and White Nudes

All images by Lachlan Walker. Used with permission. This is a syndicated blog post from La Noir Image. This and other stories are a preview of what you’ll get when you sign up and help fund our Kickstarter.

Instagram: @lachlanjames_

Website; lachlanwalkercreative.tumblr.com

My name is Lachlan Walker, I’m a 23 year old photographer from Melbourne, Australia. Photography is something relatively new for me.

Up until 2 and a half years ago I’d never touched a camera in my life. It was only when I met my girlfriend, who had always had a passion for photography, that I first picked up a camera. It was an old Nikon D3000, not much good on a technical level, but it was enough to spark my interest. A few months later I purchased my first camera of my own, a Canon AE-1 Program.

This was the camera that made me fall in love with photography in a big way.

This was also the camera that gave me such an appreciation of black and white photography.

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Eddie Cheng: The Leaning Chronicles

Photo Essays is a series on the Phoblographer where photographers get to candidly speak their mind about a specific subject or project of theirs. Want to submit? Send them to editors@thephoblographer.com.

All images and text by Eddie Cheng. Be sure to also follow him on Facebook and Twitter.

I am a professional UK/London-based self-taught graphic designer but ‘classically’ trained photographer working mainly in corporate identity, advertising and commercial.

I don’t follow the work of many other photographers, preferring to take inspiration from every day life — but my work is influenced by international cinema, film photography, Polaroid, my design work… and a very British sense of humour.

Away from regular work I like to shoot emotive people photography tells a ‘story’, provokes a reaction from the viewer and gives me a challenge. As a result I shoot various different genres whilst adding my own, hopefully distinctive, style — portraiture, erotica, urban/street, fashion, nude etc.

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Photography and the Politics of Experience

Photo Essays is a series on the Phoblographer where photographers get to candidly speak their mind about a specific subject or project of theirs. Want to submit? Send them to editors@thephoblographer.com.

All images and text by Greg Turner.

I’m an amateur photographer, motivated to try and understand the world and the people who live in it a little better through the medium of photography.

It has taken me a good few years of taking pictures for me to figure out what kind of photographer I am. My father enjoyed photography and like everything else he was interested in, I also wanted to be able to take good pictures. My first camera was a little Konica Pop, so called because the built in flash would ‘pop’ up out of the camera body on a spring loaded hinge. I used to stand for minutes at a time staring through the tiny viewfinder, trying to steady my hand and compose my shot. I naively thought that the longer I waited, the steadier my hand would get and the better my shots would be. They never were. They were always just snaps and so the interest faded a little more each time I got a roll of film back.

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Garrett Graham: American Graffiti in Cuba

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This is a syndicated blog post from Garrett Graham. It and the photos in this post are used with permission.

Havana Is a colorful and beautiful place. You can’t go two blocks without finding a live band playing salsa music or a cobblestone plaza built in the 1800s. Needless to say the city and people photograph beautifully.

The country has a foot in both the present and the past, so I decided to channel that past and only bring a film camera. Call me hipster or whatever you’d like, but I felt the right camera to bring was my Bronica ETRS. I left my SD cards and Canon at home and this is what I brought back.

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