Challenge Yourself: PrismFX Centerfield Split Diopter Filter Review

The PrismFX Centerfield Split Diopter Filter is unlike anything we’ve tried before.

Let’s be honest here; traditional photography is starting to get boring. These days, we define traditional photography as shooting then editing. It’s monotonous. Instead, finding a way to get it right in-camera is more entertaining. And that’s why we’re fascinated by the PrismFX Centerfield Split Diopter Filter. It’s designed to inspire you to think differently. Remember when Instagram used to do the tilt-shift effect in a certain area only? Well, that’s what this is like. Except, in this case, you only have it in the center. And you can rotate it however you’d like. 

Too Long, Didn’t Read

The PrismFX Centerfield Split Diopter is a one-trick pony that’s really tough to use with an interchangeable lens camera.

Pros and Cons

Pros

  • Fairly good build quality
  • It’s something much different

Cons

  • Connecting it to an adapter ring and then trying to undo it can be annoying.

Gear Used

We tested the PrismFX Centerfield Split Diopter filter with the Canon EOS R5 and the Canon RF 50mm f1.2 L USM.

What’s Innovative

Nothing out there has this effect. The closest thing are a few tilt-shift effects that apps can give you. But in terms of hardware, nothing is designed to give this sort of look.

Tech Specs

Specs taken from their listing page

  • 77mm Rotating Filter
  • Creates Blurry Refraction FX while leaving middle open for focus on subject
  • Different effects at different focal lengths
  • +4 Diopter Strength
  • Recommended Aperture (35mm – 85mm) / More Telephoto
  • Recommended Aperture (2.8 / 2 / 1.4)
  • Has 77mm Filter Pouch (when in stock) 
  • 20cm x 20cm Microfiber Cleaning Cloth /w logo (Gift with purchase when in stock / 1 per order) 

Ergonomics

The PrismFX Centerfield Split Diopter is designed like a circular filter. So you can look at it rotate the split-field around. This will give you different effects.

For what it’s worth, the ring on the outside is built a little plasticky. So just be careful when you attach it to a lens.

Build Quality

Of all the PrismFX lens filters I use, this one is probably lacking the most in build quality. The ring itself isn’t the brass I’m used to from other brands. That results in some frustrations. When it’s connected to a lens, removing it can be annoying. That’s amplified when I’m using a step-down adapter. 

Plus, for what it’s worth, mine has already been cracked after little use. 

Ease of Use

The PrismFX Centerfield Split Diopter is pretty simple to use in theory. You essentially just need to turn it to intentionally blur areas. But it’s bound to throw off your camera’s autofocus. It did this a bunch of times with the Canon EOS R5 and the 50mm f1.2 RF lens. With that said, it’s not the easiest to use. It can sometimes even be a bit annoying.

Image Quality

Of course, the cool thing about this is the image quality. This lens filter is going to intentionally keep just a sliver of the photo in focus and the rest blurred. Combine this with a super shallow depth of field, and the effect is amplified.

In the photo above, more of Will should’ve been in focus. But instead, it’s intensifying the blur.

Conclusions

Likes

  • It’s a fun effect.

Dislikes

  • Price
  • Hard to use
  • Build quality

Of all the filters that PrismFX offers, this is honestly my least favorite. The PrismFX Centerfield Split Diopter is tough to use. However, very cool things can be done with it. And you may be better off stopping the lens down a lot and then using this effect. But if that’s the case, then you’re probably just better off using your phone and applying a filter instead.

The PrismFX Centerfield Split Diopter receives three out of five stars.

Chris Gampat

Chris Gampat is the Editor in Chief, Founder, and Publisher of the Phoblographer. He also likes pizza.