A New Way to Attach Filters: The H&Y RevoRing Filter System Review

The H&Y RevoRing Filter System is an innovative way to adapt circular filters quickly and easily across a variety of lenses.

Every so often, a product comes along and changes the way we’ve done something. That’s precisely what the H&Y RevoRing Filter System is trying to do with how photographers use Neutral Density and Circular Polarizing filters. For many photographers, ND and CPL filters serve critical roles in their photography workflow. The problem with traditional threaded round lens filters is that they’re limited to a single filter thread. If you’ve got a handful of lenses, each bearing a different filter thread, they would each require their own filter: that can add up to quite a lot of filters very quickly. While filter holder systems alleviate this by allowing you to use one set of filters across a bunch of different lenses, they often require you to juggle a lot of different components. With H&Y’s RevoRing Filter System, the only components you have to manage are the RevoRing itself and the filters you will need. The folks over at H&Y sent us pre-production samples of the RevoRing Filter System to evaluate ahead of its Kickstarter campaign launch. Does it live up to its promise?

Pros and Cons

Pros

  • Allows you to use the same filters across multiple lenses of varying filter threads
    • the 52mm RevoRings support lenses with filter threads ranging from 37mm to 49mm
    • the 67mm RevoRings support lenses with filter threads ranging from 46mm to 62mm
    • the 82mm RevoRings support lenses with filter threads ranging from 67mm to 82mm
    • the 95mm RevoRings support lenses with filter threads ranging from 82mm to 95mm
  • Innovative spring-loaded attachment mechanism attaches to and detaches from lenses very quickly
  • Lightweight, metal construction

Cons

  • Adjustable “Turn, Hold, and Release” attachment mechanism could be smoother
  • Not compatible with traditional square or rectangular filters
  • Not compatible with lenses that lack front filter threads (typically ultra-wide-angles with bulbous front elements)
  • Variable ND filters and variable Circular Polarizing filters can be challenging to remove by hand (the H&Y reps informed us that a removal tool will be included with the final production versions)

Gear Used

We tested the H&Y RevoRing Filter System using the following:

Tech Specs

Tech specs for the H&Y RevoRing Filter Holder System taken from H&Y’s official press release:

RevoRing

  • Utilizes unique innovative, retractable & variable diaphragm design
  • Constructed from architectural building-grade 6063 aluminum
  • Available in four different sizes
    • the 52mm RevoRing support lenses with filter threads ranging from 37mm to 49mm
    • the 67mm RevoRing support lenses with filter threads ranging from 46mm to 62mm
    • the 82mm RevoRing support lenses with filter threads ranging from 67mm to 82mm
    • the 95mm RevoRing support lenses with filter threads ranging from 82mm to 95mm

RevoRing with Variable ND + Circular Polarizer

  • Utilizes unique innovative, retractable & variable diaphragm design
  • Constructed from architectural building-grade 6063 aluminum
  • Available in four different sizes
    • the 52mm RevoRing support lenses with filter threads ranging from 37mm to 49mm
    • the 67mm RevoRing support lenses with filter threads ranging from 46mm to 62mm
    • the 82mm RevoRing support lenses with filter threads ranging from 67mm to 82mm
    • the 95mm RevoRing support lenses with filter threads ranging from 82mm to 95mm
  • Built-in variable MRC HD ND3-1000 Neutral Density + Circular Polarizer
    • Made from German Schott B270 glass
    • Anti-Reflective, Anti-Fingerprint, & Waterproof Nano Coatings applied

Ergonomics

As of press time, the H&Y RevoRing Filter System is available in four variations. The two smaller RevoRings support lenses with filter threads ranging from 46mm to 62mm, while the larger pair of RevoRings can be used with lenses with filter threads ranging from 67mm to 82mm. At a glance, they look like traditional filters with oversized bezels. You can either opt for the RevoRings that come integrated with H&Y’s own variable MRC HD ND3-1000+CPL filters, or go for the standalone RevoRings and use whatever 67mm or 82mm circular filters you choose. The above image shows the four different RevoRing variants.
Editor’s Note: both the basic RevoRing and the RevoRing with integrated Variable ND + CPL will also be available in two additional sizes through Kickstarter campaign: 52mm (supporting lenses with filter threads ranging from 37mm to 49mm) and 95mm sizes (supporting lenses with filter threads ranging from 82mm to 95mm).

Here’s another look of the four RevoRings, with filters attached onto the standalone RevoRings. The standalone 46mm to 62mm RevoRing has a 67mm H&Y HD MRC Slim 4 Stop ND filter attached, while the standalone 67mm to 82mm RevoRing has an 82mm H&Y MRC C-Polarizing Filter attached.

Here’s a closer look at the standalone H&Y RevoRing from the attachment side. The 67mm to 82mm variant is pictured above, but the 46mm to 62mm version is functionally identical. What makes the H&Y RevoRing Filter System is the adjustable, spring-loaded “Turn, Hold, and Release” attachment system.

As you can see, the front ring is knurled while the rear ring is ridged. In order to attach a RevoRing onto one of your lenses, simply follow the etched instructions.

The RevoRing’s attachment mechanism functions similarly to how stopping down apertures on lenses work. Start by gripping the RevoRing by the front knurled ring, then turn the ridged ring to engage the spring-loaded attachment mechanism. Hold both rings in place when it looks like the above image and place the RevoRing onto the front of your lens. Simply release the ridged rear ring at this point and the spring-loaded attachment mechanism will latch itself onto the filter thread on your lens. Once attached, turn the RevoRing slightly counterclockwise until it’s finger tight to ensure it is attached properly. The whole process takes no more than a few seconds and becomes second nature once you’ve familiarized yourself with the system.

The RevoRings with integrated variable Neutral Density + Circular Polarizing filters attaches identically to the standalone RevoRings. The only difference is the inclusion of H&Y’s own Variable MRC HD ND3-1000+CPL filters.

Here’s a closer look at how you can adjust the integrated variable ND + Circular Polarizing filter. Notice the two additional rings towards the front of the RevoRing. The front-most metal ring (where the markings are etched as seen in the above image) holds the variable ND + CPL and can be turned to adjust the filter’s intensity. A small metal handle is built into the second metal ring (also ridged) and allows you to adjust the orientation of the variable ND + CPL filter easily once it’s been attached to your lens.

Editor’s Note: H&Y reps have informed us that final production versions of the RevoRing will include some additional features:

  • hard stop at the max point shown on the filter ring, restricting the movement of the VND filter beyond the maximum 10 stops (ND1000)
  • additional guide pin fitted to the VND ring for better control
  • new laser markings on the outer edge of the VND ring calculated and applied based on the maximum focal distance before any crossfade appears

A padded soft pouch is included with each RevoRing, allowing you to store them safely when not in use.

Build Quality

The H&Y RevoRing Filter System feels very solid thanks to its metal construction. The RevoRing’s spring-loaded attachment system offers just enough resistance when turning that makes it easy to operate, but not so easy that you have to worry about it becoming accidentally detached. Overall, the RevoRings feel more than tough enough to withstand being tossed around within camera bags/cases or bumping up against other camera equipment. Just don’t go using one of the RevoRings in a game of ultimate frisbee.

All of the RevoRings worked as expected, although the spring-loaded attachment system could turn a bit more smoothly. When engaging the attachment mechanism on the pre-production units, you can hear the metal components rubbing up against one another. This didn’t cause any issues during our tests with the RevoRings, but can become a potential issue over time if not addressed. This could be easily remedied with the application of some lubricant on the final production models. In conversations with H&Y’s representatives, they’ve confirmed that although minor changes may be made to the RevoRing’s design, the pre-production samples that we reviewed are basically 90%+ of what the final production versions will be. Expect the final version of the RevoRings to be further refined when they ship out after the Kickstarter campaign concludes.

Ease of Use

All of the RevoRings were very simple to use. We had already covered how simple the attachment process is within the Ergonomics section. As long as the lens you’re using has front filter threads that range from 46mm to 62mm or 67mm to 82mm, there’s a RevoRing that will suit your needs. Simply follow the instructions etched onto the back of the RevoRings (Turn, Hold, and Release) and you’re good to go. After using the system for a while, the attachment and detachment process becomes second nature. The process does take both hands though, so make sure your camera is securely attached to a camera strap or mounted onto a tripod first. The RevoRings with integrated variable Circular Polarizing filters can be super helpful to photographers that shoot a lot of reflective surfaces. Photographers that use Neutral Density filters of various strengths (such as landscape shooters) will want to stick with the standalone RevoRings and use their own 67mm or 82mm circular ND filters. A note to photographers that plan on using variable ND filters or variable Circular Polarizing filters with the standalone RevoRings. Since most variable filters feature outer rings that include a rotating element, they can be challenging to remove by hand when attached to one of the standalone RevoRings. We actually encountered this issue with H&Y’s own variable CPL and had to use a filter wrench to unscrew it from the standalone RevoRing. Also, there’s, unfortunately, no way to attach square or rectangular filters onto any of the RevoRings. If you’ve got a good amount of square and rectangular filters, stick with more conventional filter systems like ones from Lee or Haida.

Editor’s Note: the H&Y reps have informed us that a variable ND/CPL removal tool will be included with final production versions of the RevoRing.

Image Quality

As with any filter system, the quality of the images produced is directly dependent on the filters used. The H&Y RevoRing filter system is simply a way to attach filters onto your lenses. Using quality filters from reputable brands rather than cheap plastic ones will obviously produce the best results. When shooting with the RevoRings with integrated variable ND + CPLs, we didn’t detect any color cast. Here are some sample images shot with the Fujifilm X-T4 and Fujifilm GFX 100 using the H&Y RevoRing Filter System. These images were processed using Capture One 20, ranging from color grading, cropping, levels adjustment, and/or perspective correction. As a matter of ethics, however, none of the sample images seen within this review have been retouched so that you can judge the quality of the images produced using this filter system for yourself.

Conclusion

Likes

  • Innovative attachment mechanism
  • Allows you to use the same filters across different lenses of varying filter threads
  • Well built
  • Lightweight

Dislikes

  • Doesn’t work with traditional square or rectangular filters
  • No way to attach RevoRings onto ultra-wide-angle lenses that lack front filter threads

When it comes to filter holder systems, there are plenty of options available on the market that all basically work by using adapter rings. With the H&Y RevoRing Filter System, they’ve introduced a truly innovative attachment mechanism that does away with adapter rings altogether. The RevoRing’s spring-loaded attachment mechanism allows you to attach or detach filters in just seconds. This is significantly faster when compared to traditional filter systems where you need to first thread an adapter ring onto the front of your lens, then mount a filter holder to said adapter ring, and finally slotting in the appropriate filter(s).

Even though the units that we tested were pre-production samples, they all worked flawlessly. The spring-loaded attachment mechanism could be a bit smoother though, but applying some lubricant should alleviate this issue with the final production units. The only real drawbacks with the H&Y RevoRing Filter System are its incompatibilities with traditional square or rectangular filters and lenses sans front filter threads (common with ultra-wide-angle lenses that tend to have massive, bulbous front elements). As long as the lenses you’re using have a front filter thread measuring between 37mm to 49mm, 46mm to 62mm, 67mm to 82mm, or 82mm to 95mm, then the RevoRing could be a great addition to your kit.

The H&Y RevoRing Filter System earns Four out of Five Stars. Its innovative attachment mechanism and solid build quality make it a worthy investment for any photographer whose workflow frequently necessitates the use of Neutral Density and Circular Polarizing filters. The Kickstarter campaign for the H&Y RevoRing Filter System is live now.

Pauleth Ip

Paul is a New York City based photographer, creative, and writer. His body of work includes headshots and commercial editorials for professionals, in-demand actors/performers, high net worth individuals, and corporate clients, as well as intimate lifestyle/boudoir photography with an emphasis on body positivity and empowerment. Paul also has a background in technology and higher education, and regularly teaches private photography seminars. When not working on reviews and features for The Phoblographer or shooting client work, Paul can be seen photographing personal projects around NYC, or traveling the world with his cameras in tow. You can find Paul’s latest work on his Instagram over at @thepicreative.