3 Nikon Cameras Perfect for Landscape Photographers

Innovative cameras - Nikon D850
If you love landscape photography and you love Nikon cameras, these are the three cameras worth a closer look.

If you love heading into the great outdoors to capture the magnificence of the countryside, and you just happen to like Nikon cameras as well, this roundup is for you. We have gone through our extensive review section and have picked out three Nikon cameras that would make the perfect companion for any landscape photographer. Join us after the break to see which Nikon cameras we would take with us on a landscape photoshoot.

The Nikon cameras picked for this roundup are perfectly suited to landscape photography. The Nikon D500 is still perhaps the best all-round APS-C camera on the market thanks to its tank-like build and a sensor that serves up a large amount of dynamic range. The D850 is built to withstand just about anything you or mother nature could throw at it, and the large 45.7-megapixel sensor captures all the detail you could ever need. The Z7 is similar to the D850, but its slightly smaller size and lighter weight make it a little more travel-friendly, which could come in handy on long hikes. You cannot go wrong with any of these Nikon cameras, and we’re sure you’ll be impressed with the landscape images you can create with them.

 

Nikon D500

 

Nikon cameras - D500

Here are the pros and cons from our full review:

Pros

  • Fast, accurate autofocus
  • A dedicated thumb joystick for changing AF points
  • The new touchscreen is an interesting and welcome addition
  • Integration of Wifi is welcome
  • Top-notch build quality
  • Battery life that refuses to die
  • Such a good camera that I think it’s overkill for a lot of people

Cons

  • Pretty big – tough to get into some messenger bags

Buy now ($1,496.95): Adorama

 

Captured with the D850

Pro Tip:  These Nikon cameras are feature-packed, and unless you know you to get the most out of them, your images may not be as good as you would wish. Fortunately, there are a ton of guides that quickly teach all about your camera. These camera specific guides will help you learn the ins and outs so you can get the shots you want the first time, every time. Check out the guides for the D500, the D850, and the Z7, and then put what you have learn into practice so that you create your best images yet.

 

Nikon D850

 

Nikon cameras D850

Here are the pros and cons from our full review:

Pros

  • Fantastic image quality
  • Built like a tank
  • Buttons that light up
  • The touch screen makes the menu navigation much better
  • Great color depth and versatility
  • Wifi and Bluetooth
  • Putting the ISO button on the right side of the camera by the grip is the better long term strategy
  • Weather sealing
  • Lots of video options
  • Dual card slots
  • The best viewfinder of any DSLR we’ve used

Cons

  • Slower autofocus than the Nikon D810 in some situations
  • We wish the white balance levels were more adjustable
  • Sort of shocked the dual card slots aren’t both SD; we don’t know anyone that uses XQD. Sony, the developer of the card, doesn’t even use them in their still cameras

Buy now ($2,796.95): Adorama

 

Nikon cameras - Z7

Pro Tip: One tool every landscape photographer should have is a set of graduated filters. Graduated filters will help correctly expose high contrast scenes in-camera. They are easy to use, and they will save a ton of time during post. It’s well worth spending a little bit of money on a set of filters, especially if you are serious about landscape photography. This set offers a great starting point at an affordable price.

 

Nikon Z7

 

camera deals

Here are the pros and cons from our full review:

Pros

  • Good feeling in the hand
  • Solid weather sealing
  • Lots of focusing points
  • Good high ISO output
  • Lots of resolution
  • A touch screen
  • Image stabilization is very good
  • The viewfinder is beautiful
  • We genuinely appreciate the top LCD screen
  • Outstanding battery life

Cons

  • Little things annoy me, like not being able to push the joystick in to bring the focusing point back to the center
  • Why the hell is there an XQD card slot?
  • We’d really prefer dual card slots
  • Changing the white balance is a slow process
  • While we understand Nikon’s philosophy in including a dedicated ISO button, we’d have preferred a dial of some sort
  • You still have to screw the lenses to the left instead of to the right like LITERALLY EVERYONE ELSE DOES!
  • The muscle memory learning curve is steeper than with most other cameras

Buy now ($2,696.95): Adorama