The Benefits of Photographing More

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One of the main characteristics in digital photography is that you can shoot more at no extra cost. With film, every frame is money spent, which can inspire more carefully thought-out compositions. If you’re footing the bill, that’s something to keep in mind. DSLRs, on the other hand, lend themselves to a certain laziness–a sort of haphazard shooting that can lead to large crop of bad photos, and when you’re sitting down to edit, you don’t want to trudge through the muck. This isn’t always the case, but it happens.

More importantly, whether you’re at a concert, a party, on assignment or anything else, you’ll want to use the film mentality while taking advantage of digital’s inherent capacity for multitudes. One of the worst feelings is when you realize during the editing session that there’s a shot you need that you didn’t get for whatever reason. It’s happened to me and many others, I’m sure.

Shooting more often entails having several different angles of the same scene. It means that you have more options to work with, some of which could possibly be repurposed for future projects, but it also means that you need to be just as judicious in your editing process. Don’t allow a photo through that doesn’t fit the bill entirely, but don’t delete it. You might be able to use it somewhere else.

Working with more photos can be overwhelming at times, but it’s easier to cut down than having to struggle to find the right one in a smaller batch. Exercise care in shooting means you’ll have an easier time editing because it feels far better to deal with a batch of good photos than a mixed bag.

When you shoot more, you also stand a greater chance of getting the perfect shot. Why settle for anything less?