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The new ZEISS Distagon T* 1,4/35 ZM for professional reportage photography Das neue ZEISS Distagon T* 1,4/35 ZM für die Profi-Reportagefotografie

There were rumors of a new Zeiss 35mm f1.4 Otus lens floating around the web, and if you’re a forum lurker hoping to bite your lip and close your eyes to the chart readings then you’ll probably be a bit disappointed. The reason for that is because the new Zeiss 35mm f1.4 ZM lens was designed for Leica M mount cameras. It has been unveiled today at Photokina 2014.

As it is though, 35mm f1.4 lenses are very highly sought after in the M mount world with Leica releasing a redesign of theirs a couple of years ago. The new Zeiss 35mm f1.4 ZM lens features a T* anti-reflective lens coasting, 10 blade aperture, 1/3 stop adjustment, and ergonomic finger rest,

We’re very curious about how this will perform on cameras like the Sony A7r or the Fujifilm XT1. But at $2,290 this is a bit more than we can swallow. Tech specs are after the jump.

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Zeiss Rokinon Sigma 85mm f1.4 three way comparison (1 of 3)ISO 4001-125 sec at f - 3.5

With Zeiss’s new 85mm f1.4 Otus reviewed, we took it upon ourselves to do an informal comparison of two of its biggest and closest competitors: the Rokinon 85mm f1.4 and the Sigma 85mm f1.4. Now granted, neither of these lenses are said to be targeted at the higher end photographer. But with Sigma’s offering being a couple of years old and Rokinon’s not being so old either, we decided that it would be great to see just how the three perform against one another.

Editor’s Note: Again we are saying that this is an informal comparison to see how the three stack up against one another. We’d like to remind our readers though that each offering is pretty darn solid, but if anything this is more of a measure of how the technology has progressed.

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chris-gampat-the-phoblographer-yashica-electro-35-gsn-camera

When it comes to cameras there are two categories that many are split into: DLSRs and Mirrorless cameras. Rangefinders are a sub-division of mirrorless cameras that have been around for years and years. In fact, they’re older than SLR cameras and are largely unchanged in their basic design and functionality since their inception.

But with more cameras being more retro looking, how do you exactly tell the difference between the two?

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Zeiss 85mm f1.4 Otus product images review (1 of 7)ISO 4001-125 sec at f - 2.0

For a couple of weeks now, we’ve been testing the Zeiss 85mm f1.4 Otus lens on the Nikon D810. We’ve teased some images on our Instagram and got you guys excited about what it might be. Indeed, the mystery lens was the Zeiss 85mm f1.4 Otus. Recently announced in time for Photokina 2014, the 85mm f1.4 Otus is the company’s entry into the no-compromise on image quality arena. It is the follow up and partner to its 55mm f1.4 Otus–which received our Editor’s Choice award.

The Zeiss 85mm f1.4 Otus features 11 elements in 9 groups and a massive 86mm filter thread. Indeed, this is a serious piece of glass and of considerable size.

And despite the fact that Zeiss has delivered a spectacular product, just one thing made taking images a bit tough at times.

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Newest Otus family member from ZEISS continues the success story Zuwachs in der Otus Familie von ZEISS setzt Erfolgsgeschichte fort

It was only a matter of time until Zeiss added a new lens to the Otus family: and today the company is announcing their 85mm f1.4 Otus lens. The company said on Facebook last year that they’d be releasing a new lens and indeed it’s on its way for Photokina 2014. Before we even get into it, the price is $4,490–way too much for many of us mere mortals. But the company has surely done a lot of work to make sure that the performance is the utmost top of the line. Indeed, we’ve been testing the lens for a couple of weeks now and it has been blowing our minds.

As for the features of the lens, it sports an all metal exterior with the exception of the focusing ring–which is made of rubber just like the company’s Touit lenses. The reason for this is due to working in the cold weather with the lenses. It has 11 elements in 9 groups, a minimum aperture of f16, has an 86mm filter thread, comes in Canon EF and Nikon F mounts, and weights 1140g for the Nikon version with the Canon version coming in at 1200g.

The lens is obviously targeted at portrait photographers along with fashion photographers–but given our user experience with the 55mm f1.4 Otus lens we will probably think that manually focusing the optic without a tripod may tend to shake the camera up a bit to get accurate focusing consistently.

At this point though, the photo world is most likely drooling over this lens but looking at Sigma for an autofocus response.

More tech specs and images are after the jump.

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julius motal the phoblographer Loxia 35 mm Product Sample 2014.05.08 3

Fresh from Zeiss’s factory come two new lenses for Sony’s full-frame E-mount line of cameras: the Loxia 35mm f2 and the Loxia 50mm f2. Each lens is solely manual focus and has a clickless aperture ring and a depth of field scale. True to Zeiss’ tradition, the lenses have a metal body, and to meet the demands of the A7/R/S, they’re weather-sealed, too. They’ll get their first display at Photokina in two weeks.

Based on the tech specs, these lenses will be a boon for street photographers and photojournalists, and we bet that the 50mm in particular will work well for portrait photographers both outside and in the studio.

The 50mm f2 will be available in October for $949.99, and the 35mm f2 will be available towards the end of the year for $1299.99. Once we get the lenses in, we’ll be sure to review them for you.

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