Using New Camera Lenses with Old School Film Emulsions

One of the cooler things about owning a camera with a legacy lens system is that you can use their lenses with old school film cameras loaded with fresh film. That typically goes for lots of new lens options on the market. To be clear, this means that Canon EF, Nikon F, Pentax K, Leica M, and Sony/Minolta A mount lenses can all work seamlessly on your film cameras and your digital cameras without the need for an adapter. In fact, for a really long time I’ve used the Canon EOS Elan 7 as a backup camera body of sorts.

So what happens when you use new lenses with film? Those of you who grew up with film may say nothing special. But for those of us who started in digital, we say differently.

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Review: Zeiss 85mm f2.4 Loxia (Sony E Mount, Full Frame)

There’s something incredibly nostalgic about a lens like the Zeiss 85mm f2.4 Loxia. From it’s small size almost mimicking the ZM lineup of glass, to the aperture ring, it just feels like a modern classic. Part of this has been the Zeiss experience, which is something that can’t really be expressed in words and instead only experienced. Previously only reserved for the rich, Zeiss lenses have become more popular with enthusiasts and it’s meant that people also have begun to truly appreciate how much better the image quality can be from a lens like the Loxia. Designed for Sony full frame E Mount cameras, the Zeiss Loxia 85mm f2.4 is capable of delivering truly stunning images and almost never really needs to be stopped down in most situations.

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Review: Zeiss 21mm f2.8 Loxia (Sony E Mount, FE)

The first time  I handled the Zeiss Loxia lenses I didn’t truly understand them considering they also have the Batis lineup. But after using the Zeiss 21mm f2.8 Loxia lens I’ve begun to understand it a bit more. Think about the system as a Leica M camera: you’ve got small, high quality glass that is manual focus and well built with great image quality. That’s what the Loxia lineup is, and considering what the Zeiss 21mm f2.8 Loxia lens is capable of there is very little to complain about aside from the price point.

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Why Do Photographers Need a UV Filter For Their Lenses?

It happens often: you go to buy a lens and you’re offered the option of also purchasing a UV filter. But do you really need one? Photographers are often confused as to whether or not to get one. For many years, photographers have used UV Filters for a number of reasons. In fact, most photographers who started in digital most likely didn’t get one.

So here’s the explanations for them all.

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5 Reasons for Portrait Photographers to Get Super Excited About the New Sigma 135mm f1.8 DG Art Lens

Yesterday, the new Sigma 135mm f1.8 Art lens was announced–and it’s an understandably amazing reason for portrait photographers to get very hyped up. The 135mm focal length is one of the best options out there for portrait photographers. It does a whole lot of compression of your subject and is often perfect for headshots. Of course, you’re standing pretty far back away from them but the lens is capable of delivering so many great looks that you’re bound to just fall in love with its capabilities.

So here are some reasons why we’re so hyped about the new Sigma 135mm f1.8 Art lens.

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A Look at How Digital Cameras Lose Their Value Compared to Film Bodies

If you’ve even decided to click on this article then you’re probably aware of some of the frustrations some of your fellow photographers feel. Let’s preface this: four or five years ago you may have purchased a Fujifilm X Pro 1. Last year it was updated, giving it a sufficient four year life span. Now you want to upgrade, and you’re finding they’re still going for at a ridiculously low price brand new and only a few hundred used. But the newer cameras like the Fujifilm X Pro 2 costs around $1,699. Fujifilm isn’t exclusive to this: so too is Sony and the Micro Four Thirds coalition.

Now if you look at some of the film camera bodies, you’ll start to realize just how well they hold their value–especially if the system is still current.

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Sigma 85mm F1.4 Art Beats Zeiss Otus in DXO Tests

Sigma has been on an absolute tear with their lenses the past several years, especially with their new 85mm f1.4! They have been making child’s play of OEM brand lenses from Canon and Nikon, but one brand that still always managed to best them (granted at a considerable premium in price) was Zeiss. But that is no more, at least according to the these just released DXO test results. Continue reading…