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Sony 35mm f1.4 photos

Sony has been working on responding to the criticism that they don’t have enough lenses for their full frame E mount system in a similar way that Fujifilm did when coming out later on the scene: by cranking them out. But the Sony Zeiss 35mm f1.4 doesn’t feel rushed at all. In fact, it feels very timeless and beautiful. This lens has a very unique design with its aperture ring–it’s the first Sony lens to have one and is designed for videographers who want easier control over their lenses. Rather than fully building a cinema lens, Sony solved the problem by giving it autofocus abilities that also work well for still shooting.

With a metal exterior, weather resistance, and solid focusing abilities for its size and weight, there is very little for us to not like about this lens.

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Zeiss 58mm f2 Biotar images (3 of 4)ISO 4001-60 sec at f - 8.0

Vintage lenses weren’t designed for digital photography; but their effects is one that isn’t often mimicked anymore in digital and that can be very beautiful. These lenses aren’t the sharpest, they don’t have micro contrast, they don’t have the saturated colors that modern lenses have, and they don’t resolve as much detail–but they’ll give you an incredible look that you could be in love with right out of the camera. Indeed, some of these lenses are popular and some aren’t. But in our tests and trials, these are a few that really stand out.

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zeiss touit 32mm no hood

In today’s Edition of Cheap Photo, we’ve found new rebates available on the Zeiss Touit lenses along with much more like Olympus OMD EM5 discounts. Check them out after the jump.

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Zeiss 50mm f2 Loxia review product photos (2 of 6)ISO 2001-125 sec at f - 4.0

Zeiss stirred up quite the love affair with us when we tested the 35mm f2 Loxia. While I’m much more of a 35mm lens lover, the 50mm f2 Loxia certainly has more of my attention. Where the 35mm f2 has great image quality, the 50mm f2 has the Zeiss-like colors and micro-contrast that we’ve come to expect.

With a metal exterior, sweet ergonomics, great colors, sharp image quality, and a small overall package to work with the A7 series of cameras, why would you dislike it?

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Zeiss 35mm f2 Loxia review product lead images (1 of 2)ISO 64001-60 sec at f - 2.8

Our introductions to lenses tend to bit a bit of a nice padding to our reviews, but in this case we’re going to get straight to the point in an analogy.

Imagine if you will for a second that you think that you’ve met the love of your life. Though both of you may not know it yet, you’re perfect for one another. At the time that you two meet and mingle and do the whole dating thing, one of you needs to break it off. Years later though, you find one another again–and after a very passionate and wonderful moment, you truly find one another.

This is what the current Zeiss and Sony relationship is like: except in this case it’s Zeiss that’s perfect and Sony that still has some self-discovery to do.

The Zeiss 35mm f2 Loxia lens is in many ways the one for Sony–the absolutely most perfect 35mm lens designed for mirrorless cameras that we’ve ever come across. For shooters like us, using it is very much like second nature. It takes some of the best of external designs like those of Zeiss classic and modern Fujifilm to create a lens that is one that you’d be stupid not to go after.

And again, it’s not Zeiss that has us in a fit about using the lens. A problem with Sony full frame cameras that has been around for a while is what’s breaking our hearts.

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Zeiss 35mm f2 Loxia first impressions product images (9 of 9)ISO 4001-100 sec at f - 5.0

Late last year, Zeiss announced two lenses for the Sony full frame E-mount cameras, which created the Loxia lineup. These lenses were designed to cover a full frame sensor area for mirrorless cameras like the Sony A7 series. The lenses are manual focus only–which is one of Zeiss’s fortes and has been for years due to their reputation in the manufacturing world. They also have a manual aperture and fully working depth of field scale. And like their more popular lens options, these lenses don’t have a rubber focusing ring.

We’ve been spending some time with the Zeiss 35mm f2 Loxia so far, and like many manual focus lenses on a full frame camera, it isn’t simple to work with.

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