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Photography

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Leica XE product images (1 of 10)ISO 4001-160 sec at f - 2.5

Want more useful photography tips? Click here.

Yes, many of you photographers love to complain about vignetting. But you can actually embrace it and use it creatively. We’ve talked about proper techniques to making your images look sharper and making colors pop out more, but another way to emphasize a subject more in an image is to add a vignette to it. Chances are that based on your composition of a scene, the subject will be somewhere around the center or on one of the intersecting points of the rule of thirds. A vignette will make someone stare at your image and complete ignore the blacked out areas.

Of course, this doesn’t need to be a heavy vignette but we can’t tell you how many times we’ve used vignettes on product photos on this site and not a single person has sat there and complained.

If your creative vision calls for it, light vignetting can be a great thing and because of the way the human eye works, it will put higher emphasis on your subject in addition to making them pop out more on a screen or on print.

Beyond this, we recommend bumping up the contrast and tweaking the black levels. But those are all part of the process involving making your images look sharper that we linked to above.

Give it a try: and don’t be afraid to do something that the mainstream may say otherwise.



Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Cinematic look images (1 of 1)ISO 8001-100 sec at f - 2.5

Have you ever watched a movie and loved the intimate look of the scenes? Movies and cinema usually have scenes with just the subject in focus and otherwise lots and lots of bokeh. The reason for the DP choosing this cinematic style is because they’re trying to get you to focus on particular subjects to tell their story. And when it comes to story telling, it proves to be quite effective and beautiful at the same time.

Cinema and photography are very related and getting images like this is fairly simple to do. Here’s how.

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Canon G1X review images (18 of 28)ISO 1001-8 sec at f - 2.0

The Golden Hour is one of the best times for you to go out and shoot photos. But this weekend, you only have a small window to time to go out there and do it. So make the most of it! Here are some projects to get you started! [click to continue…]

tous les memes--2

All images by Natalia O. Used with permission.

Natalia O is a photographer who recently had an image selected as a finalist in the EyeEm awards last month. She has a focus on surreal and conceptual images for her artistic side, but she didn’t always shoot like this. Natalia moved to Canada from Russia at the age of 12. After finishing her Art degree at University of Toronto, she started working part time at a bank, meanwhile growing her photography business by shooting weddings and family pictures, as well as expanding her conceptual portfolio.

“Apart from work, I actually enjoy looking up Photoshop tutorials and getting the satisfaction out of finishing my own little photography projects. I also have a soft spot for old cameras, chocolate and French accents.” says Natalia. And some of that has influence over her surreal photography.



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The Photographer_Joubert_Loots

Creating the Photograph is an original series where we interview photographers about a photo that they shot and how it was achieved. The results are some knowledge passed on to you. Want to be featured? Email chrisgampat[at]thephoblographer[dot]com.

We found Joubert Loots via the recent EyeEm Awards. The image above featuring levitation was entered in as one of the finalists for the Illusionist category. Joubert’s EyeEm and Instagram accounts are filled with inspirational images–and not all of them are of the surreal/conceptual style that we see above. He is mostly a documentary street photographer but like most photographers, he tried his hand at other things in order to be experimental and grow.

Joubert’s image involves working in Lightroom and Photoshop–and it also involves using very rudimentary camera gear.

Here’s his story.

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Photo 5

All images by Alexandra Benetel. Used with permission.

Alexandra Benetel recently was honored as a Flickr 20 under 20 recipient, or at least she was when she won the award. Now twenty one year old, she is a university student from Sydney, Australia. At the age of 15, she enrolled in a Visual Design course, which sparked her passion for photography. Alex has since been published in Russia’s Harper’s Bazaar, showcased her work in Sydney and New York and has been fortunate enough to travel, meet and collaborate with other artists. Her work captures mysterious yet dream like-words, filled with oddities that encompass aspects of reality.

Alex’s identity as a photographer is with her surreal and ethereal looking portraits–though she also shoots weddings.

All this, and she’s still got her whole life ahead of her.

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