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Photography

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Heading into a concert? We’ve got good news and bad news for you.

Let’s start with the good news: you’re about to see what will hopefully be an awesome show.

The bad news: the venue may not let your pro-grade camera in. In fact, even as long as it looks pro grade, you’ll need to check it. So for that reason, you’ll need something a bit more low-profile that will fool the guards when they check your bag. The only way to do that is to not have such a serious looking piece of kit on you, but still having something comparable to the cameras that you may use.

Here are a list of cameras that won’t get checked at a concert.

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Samsung 85mm f1.4 portrait review images (1 of 3)ISO 1001-800 sec at f - 2.5

The Rule of Thirds: it’s the rule that every single photographer is told to follow from the beginning. It’s always about not centering your subjects and instead putting them around the intersecting inner corners of the image divided into nine sections. And you’re taught from the beginning to just follow this rule.

This rule has to do with technique, more than anything else. The technique is what also limits many other photographers from creating better images. What do we mean by that? When you first start out as a photographer, you’re bound to get stuck in trying to compose a scene along the rule of thirds lines. But that can either make you a better photographer or one that gets so wrapped up in the technique that they end up giving up. A similar thing happens in the video world with the 180 degree rule.

So here’s a message for beginners–telling you to compose in a brand new way.

Ready for the secret?

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Peacock

All images by Nana Tsay. Used with permission

Nana Tsay’s photos exhibit a unique, calming and pleasing aesthetic that isn’t like very much that we’ve seen before. Ms. Tsay shoots still lifes: and most focuses on food and other objects. But she does food in a totally different way. Nana has been honing her photographic eye from a very young ago and had encouraging parents who encouraged her art development. Today, they are on her Tumblr page: Urban Koi.

As an aspiring physician from New York, Nana’s hobby and first love is photography. She held her first camera and baked her first blueberry muffins at the mere age of 4–which explains her love of food. Since then, she has pursued a passion of photography and cooking together on her endeavor to become a doctor.

 

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Video thumbnail for youtube video Using Flashes for Skateboarding Photography - The Phoblographer

One of the best ways to capture extreme sports athletes in their environment is to use a flash. Flash helps to add drama to a scene while also letting you control exactly where you want the light to come from. Combine this with use of a fisheye and you’re usually well equipped to create awesome images.

Take skateboarding for example: photographer Sam McGuire shot a video a little while back on the importance of flash duration when photographing skaters. Flash duration essentially takes over whatever the shutter speed is and works to stop fast moving motion. Typically, studio strobes have much faster flash duration than speedlights and can freeze motion like a skateboarder grinding a rail.

Sam explains that flash durations are measured in fractions of a second, just like shutter speeds. “The faster the flash duration, the sharper your image will be” says Sam.

His video on using flashes for skateboard photography is after the jump.

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All images by Daniel Zvereff. Used with permission.

Photographer Daniel Zvereff was featured last year on the Phoblographer for his Introspective project. During that time Mr. Zvereff was on a tour of self-discovery that we’re sure many photographers and artists take. Interestingly, the project used Kodak Aerochrome to turn greens in his images into purples. Since then, Daniel has completed a number of other personal projects: with one of our favorites being his journey to the island of Faroe. Faroe is an island where there are quite literally more sheep than people.

Beginning a documentary project like this takes planning and lots of thought. So we chatted with Dan about what it’s like to be a documentary photographer and the Faroe project.

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Leica XE product images (1 of 10)ISO 4001-160 sec at f - 2.5

Want more useful photography tips? Click here.

Yes, many of you photographers love to complain about vignetting. But you can actually embrace it and use it creatively. We’ve talked about proper techniques to making your images look sharper and making colors pop out more, but another way to emphasize a subject more in an image is to add a vignette to it. Chances are that based on your composition of a scene, the subject will be somewhere around the center or on one of the intersecting points of the rule of thirds. A vignette will make someone stare at your image and complete ignore the blacked out areas.

Of course, this doesn’t need to be a heavy vignette but we can’t tell you how many times we’ve used vignettes on product photos on this site and not a single person has sat there and complained.

If your creative vision calls for it, light vignetting can be a great thing and because of the way the human eye works, it will put higher emphasis on your subject in addition to making them pop out more on a screen or on print.

Beyond this, we recommend bumping up the contrast and tweaking the black levels. But those are all part of the process involving making your images look sharper that we linked to above.

Give it a try: and don’t be afraid to do something that the mainstream may say otherwise.