How to Figure Out What To Charge For Your Portrait Photography

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer RNI All Films 4.0 review Kodak Delta 400 sample portrait extra Naveed (1 of 1)ISO 1001-2000 sec at f - 2.0

One of the biggest mysteries that any photographer that wants to go pro and semi-pro is what to charge for their portraiture services. It’s pretty tough and a lot of it is usually figured out by the company we keep. Many photographers will sit around asking their friends, parents, peers, colleagues, etc what to charge. But that’s one of the worst things to do because you’re probably not going to be targeting or trying to get money out of these people!

Instead, you’ll need to target a completely different demographic of folks. This isn’t an end all solution post, but it will surely help.

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Cityscape Photography: Composition, Gear and the Application

X-Pro1 + Zeiss 12mm f/2.8

All images and text by Bryan Minear. Used with permission.

When it comes to cityscape photography, I truly believe that every city has a unique “soul” to it that you have to find and visualize. Let’s begin by talking about your mindset when approaching a new city. Sometimes it takes a little time to acclimate to a certain place in order to really get the “vibe”.

For example, I have been to Chicago about 10 times now. But it wasn’t until my 3rd or 4th trip that I really started to mesh with the city and shoot the kind of photos that were portfolio-worthy. The same can be said for NYC, which is wildly different than Chicago. I still absolutely love looking back at photos from my first or second trip there, but it wasn’t until later trips that I found my groove. All in all, just do what you can when you are visiting a place. When I vacationed to London, I only had four days before we were on our way to Florence and I knew I wasn’t going to be able to just come back to shoot anytime that I wanted. So I had to do the very best that I could in the time that I had.

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5 Tips to Take Better Restaurant Food Pictures

The Salt Room

This is a syndicated blog post from Xavier D. Buendia. It and the images here are being used with permission.

Hello, as you might know by now, I spend a good part of my time taking pictures in restaurants. I shoot interiors and exteriors, I do action shots and portraits but one of the things that I enjoy the most is shooting food and plated dishes.

Shooting food at restaurants is the most challenging part of the job and it is also what I get asked the most about by bloggers, reviewers and foodies; they tend to create incredible images when shooting in their kitchens and living rooms; but often struggle when they take it to a restaurant. There are so many things to think of and look at when shooting a dish so here are five basic tips that will help you improve your restaurant photography.

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Photographer Records Struggle with American Airlines After $20,000 in Gear Damaged

credit: https://www.flickr.com/photos/aero_icarus/6568782975

A video is gaining traction on Reddit and across the web today that documents a photographer’s struggle with American Airlines after he says he was asked to check his gear due to size restrictions on the plane he would be flying on that day.

According to photographer Yosef Shidler, of CJ Studios, he then witnessed what no traveling photographer would ever want to see — an American Airlines employee holding one of his lenses, with the rest of his equipment strewn across the tarmac below the plane. According to Mr. Shidler, the pelican case in which he had his gear in, having apparently been incorrectly and hastily placed onto the loading conveyor belt, fell while on its way to the plane’s cargo hold, falling an estimated 7 or 8 feet – causing the case to pop open and send Shidler’s gear flying across the hard tarmac cement.

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Five Low Profile Messenger-Style Camera Bags

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Zeiss 85mm f1.8 review product extras (2 of 6)ISO 4001-60 sec at f - 2.8

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Many photographers love messenger bags; but they also love their gear inside quite a bit more. So when you’re going about choosing a camera bag you should choose something that is a bit less flashy. For example, logos can be big on attracting people to your bag unless they’re very subtle: so making them blend into the rest of a bag is very big. Plus also not looking generally like a camera bag is something that is important. So here are five of our favorites.

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Two Ways to Break Your Photography Gear Addiction

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Zeiss 18mm f2.8 product images (2 of 9)ISO 2001-200 sec at f - 2.8

Hey folks, don’t forget about funding our Kickstarter It’s almost over and we need lots of help!

It’s very true that many photographers can become addicted to photography gear–otherwise known as gear addiction syndrome. Essentially, it’s marketing and consumerism that fuels this in addition to the fact that they’re telling you that you’re not good enough. It’s possible that you may not be, but the only way to get better is to educate yourself…or is it.

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Imagination First, Gear Second.

2013-03-23-18.45.40

This blog post and the images are a syndicated post from Emanuele Faja. They are being used with permission.

I am writing this essay because I am getting a feeling that photography is becoming more and more about the gear and less and less about the photographs. I’m sure you know what I’m talking about…

Also, this can apply to any discipline, not just photography.

Don’t get me wrong, it’s quite amazing when new cameras come out with never-before-seen features and they blow everybody’s mind but that’s not really what photography is about, is it?

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