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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer CES 2014 MeFOTO phone adapter (7 of 10)ISO 8001-60 sec at f - 3.2

Dear iPhoneographers,

You create compelling work. I know you may hear this all the time, and I know that you’ve got all the art buyers in the Upper East Side, Chelsea and Bushwick around your fingers. So I want to tell you something: congratulations. You’ve seriously done a terrific job of showing the world that art is what comes first. It absolutely does come before gear, and a creative vision will always win out over someone toting around a 5D without a creative vision. As a creative, I want to thank you for making the world realize that don’t need the best gear in the world to create compelling imagery.

But at the same time, I want you to be well aware of your placement in the art world. Your prints in the galleries are beautiful, and I don’t think that I can say that enough. I want you to know, however, about what I’m actually capable of doing with a dedicated camera. I’m a creative with a creative vision and I will express my creativity in nowhere near as fast a pace as yours. What you’ll get from me, however, is work that took time, in which I debated whether I should crop in just a bit more, flip the image, or edit it a completely different way.

Beyond that, I want you to know that if I ever get back into shooting weddings, engagements, events or into fully shooting fashion campaigns again that I will never show up to a shoot with my Nexus 5 or the latest victim of Bendgate. I will do everything I can to work with a client to create my own lighting, deliver the vision and product that they want, and in the end, I will push my art over the fact that I’m using the latest camera from Sony.

I think that as much as you’ve become entranced with not needing a dedicated camera to create excellent images, you’ve instead become so enthralled by the other type of technology: your phone. If we switch equipment for a month, can you deliver the same work that you did? Does that make you truly an artist or some person that shoots an image, applies a filter, and wins over the hearts of curators everywhere.

In closing, what I’m saying is that you’re a creative and that I’m a creative, but that creativity should be the main priority. In the same way you can wow art buyers with your efficient and affordable way to capture an image, I can give a bride and groom photos that they’ll cry over years from now.

Maybe we can talk about it one day over coffee–which we will both then attempt to photograph beautifully.

Sincerely,

A photographer

It’s a fact: technique outdoes the latest and greatest gear every time in a contest that can’t even be considered fair. When you combine this with a creative vision and the knowledge of how to achieve said vision, you can make yourself really stand out. But these days, more than ever, lighting can make you a better photographer. Here’s why.

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Claudia Americana

All images by Jorge Quinteros. Used with permission.

When I first met Jorge Quinteros, it was years ago when we both lived in Queens, NY and when I first started the Phoblographer. We met up occasionally in cafes talking about how to create better images and gear. But today, Jorge is one step closer to living the dream that most photographers only begin to aspire to. Jorge developed the skill of carefully curating his images and only posting key selects. He started putting these on Instagram and eventually was approached by brands and made well known by the popular photo sharing service itself.

We talked to Jorge about how he did this.

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infographic the photographer and the camera

Photographer Jeremy Cowart recently shared an awesome infographic on Facebook showing off the importance of the photographer. While the notion is that the world thinks that you need a better camera to take better images, it is once again in the hands of the photographer to capture the best images. We talked about this recently in a post about gear and photography; but it’s nice to get a reminder from a pro photographer about this.

More than anything, I think we should look to the mobile world to see that folks are being creatives everywhere with little to no work from their phone’s camera.

Kevin Lee The Phoblographer Nikon D810 Product Images-5

Rumors about replacements for the Canon 7D, the Fujifilm X-Pro 1 and others are popping about like hot oil from a skillet. With Photokina a few months away, there is a lot of interest in the new cameras and lenses that will be announced. This leaves many a shutterbug handling their credit cards in eager anticipation.

And while many photographers will upgrade simply because the can, the rest of us need to be a little more thoughtful about it. Though some of these cameras may boast an exciting new assortment of features, it may or may not be what we need. Here are some questions to ask yourself before you buy.

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Fujifilm 27mm f2.8 first impressions (14 of 18)ISO 8001-60 sec at f - 2.8

It was at a party a few weeks ago here in Istanbul that I asked a working photojournalist what she shoots with. Given that she’s worked in conflict zones, I was curious about her equipment. “Canon,” she told me. I pushed the line of inquiry a bit further and asked, “5D Mark II? Mark III?” She replied, “Yeah, 5D.” That essentially ended the conversation, and it wasn’t the first time a photographer’s given me a vague answer about gear. On many occasions, I’ve heard that it’s not about the camera, it’s about the person holding the camera, and that’s true. Yet, without the camera, we would all just be folks with an eye for composition and a natural sense of light, and the visual record of the past 150 years or so would be virtually nonexistent. The subtext underlying the resistance to talking about gear seems to be that it’s somehow amateurish and unimportant, and that notion is hogwash.

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