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Editor’s Note: this is a syndicated blog post from Marius Vieth. It and the images in the post are being republished with permission.

GAS, also known as Gear Acquisition Syndrome, is very common among photographers. It simply means that you just can’t get enough new lenses, equipment and upgrade your cam as soon as possible in order to have more options and – according to the seemingly prevalent opinion – become better. But have you ever thought about the opposite side of this imaginary disease – the Gear Avoidance Syndrome? A syndrome that might even be good for you and your photography. And your wallet.

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ISO 400

With WPPI 2015 on the brink of starting up very soon, we’ve been busy scouring the web for the best in the business when it comes to wedding and portrait photography. We’ve also worked on curating and creating lots of tips and tutorials to help you get your start or help you get even further along in the photo world.

But we’re not only talking about gear: part of being a photographer is also having people skills. And as many of the photographers that we’ve interviewed will tell you, it’s pretty much everything. Here’s our giant roundup of Portrait and Wedding Tips.

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer A Street Photographer's Notebook for iPad Review (2 of 9)ISO 4001-40 sec at f - 5.6

One of the best tools that every photographer can always look back on are eBooks. And in the case of Shaun Hines, he’s back again with a brand new eBook for street photographers. The author of Unravelling the Mysteries of the Little Black Box has decided to make his talents much more specialized and in a very bite sized package. In fact, we’re talking about two chapters and a very rudimentary introduction to street photography.

A Street Photographer’s Notebook is short introduction to the art of street photography that doesn’t spend too much time getting its rocks off on gear–instead it focuses on the thought process from a very personal view.

And like many personal views, we don’t agree with all of it.

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Chris-Gampat-The-Phoblographer-Leica-M9-at-Bryant-Park-18-of

Put a camera in front of a street photographer in a given situation, and they will use it based off of the camera and lens’s specific strengths and characteristics. Yes, gear is cool–and it can help you get specific and specialized images, but it isn’t the end all be all for street photography. The most important part of taking a picture is the photographer that composes, frames, and manipulates the images to get a specific look. However, street photographers for some odd reason love to chat about gear and how amazing it is.

Yes, gear is cool. But not many people can tell which image was taken with a Leica or a Fujifilm camera. The debating back and forth along with the gearhounding is unnecessary. If I were to tell you straight up what the best camera for street photography is I would probably say the iPhone and Nexus 5. Why? Because they’re always available, have entire scenes in focus, deliver images that can easily be manipulated in a whole number of ways, and there are people who shoot with them that make their living or supplementary income from them.

With this said, there are loads and loads of street photographers that don’t accept or validate the work of many mobile shooters.

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer MyMiggo camera strap large review images (2 of 9)ISO 4001-320 sec at f - 4.5

Every photographer needs to start somewhere. But when they’re new, photographers also go through an exploratory phase where they need to find themselves. Unfortunately, not many take guidance or try to find ways to actually become better in the grand scheme of the photo world. Instead, they get sucked into traps and never find a way to get out of them to continue to evolve.

Here how you can spot those traps and how to get out of them.

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Model: Grace Morales

Model: Grace Morales

If you have fancy new photography gear, the important thing to do now is to get out and shoot with it. This is how you eventually come to justify a purchase to yourself after spending all that money on that new lens or camera. While you’re going to need to go out and find your own creative inspiration, it always helps to have a bit of guidance when it comes to actually shooting better portraits.

We’ve been publishing a lot of roundups on gear and the gear that you may need as the year rounds itself down to a close. But in order to actually do something with that gear, we’re rounding up tutorials and tips that we’ve published this year as well.

And this one will help you shoot better portraits.

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