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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer TriggerTrap Flash Adapter review images (5 of 12)ISO 4001-180 sec at f - 1.4

A while back, Triggertrap introduced the Flash Adapter, which allows Triggertrap to become its own flash trigger. When used with its sound sensor, Triggertrap can trigger a flash or strobe with just a loud sound to make it go off. The setup is very simple gear-wise, but setting this up otherwise can take some work and will need planning and experimentation. But once you have it down, you’ll be able to apply many more creative decisions to your photography.

If you’re a fan of droplet photography or capturing high speed moving subjects, then you’ll want to check this out.

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Paul C Buff Einstein E640 monolight (7 of 10)ISO 2001-50 sec at f - 2.8

What’s better? Constant lighting or strobe?

When any photographer wants to get into learning more about light, they’re bound to ask about constant lighting. As the years have progressed, constant lighting has become better and better, but it still isn’t the industry standard for many professional and high end photographers. Many still tend to lean towards working with strobes for many reasons–the specific looks that they give you are only one reason.

For your benefit, we’ve rounded up a number of pros and cons for using both constant lighting and strobe lighting. These lists are very subjective and can go on and on, but this one is designed to not overwhelm you.

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Shoulders meticulously positioned to emphasize evenness. You'll have to move one behind the other, Bring the hair to the side side opposite of the key light, part the lips slightly and bring the chin out forward a bit more

Shoulders meticulously positioned to emphasize evenness. You’ll have to move one behind the other, Bring the hair to the side side opposite of the key light, part the lips slightly and bring the chin out forward a bit more

When it comes to creating portrait photos, you’ll need to understand that the process is in some ways a collaborative effort. But it also requires empathy, understanding and a creative vision. You’ll need to be specific about posing, and have a knowledge of how the person will actually look on camera. The best way to do that is to go ahead and make lots of mistakes, figure out solutions, apply them and re-shoot.

But to help you along the way, we’ve got an Introduction to Shooting Better Portraits compiling lots of information right here for you.

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Manual Camera and Triggertrap (5 of 5)ISO 4001-40 sec at f - 2.2

There are many, many hacks that you can do with lighting to deliver a better image without spending hundreds of dollars to change the shape of the lighting. It has to do with thinking smarter about the light and knowing how RAW files work in post-production. Even if you’re not working with a flash, there are ways to make natural and ambient light help your subject look more attractive to most pairs of eyes.

Here are a number of ways without breaking the bank at all.

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Chris Gampat Melissa Perry Black and White Silhouette Inspiration (1 of 1)ISO 6401-60 sec at f - 4.0

Every now and then, we will publish a small but useful and effective tip in our series called Useful Photography Tips. With the year rounding down to a close and lots of you about to go on a holiday, we hope that you’ll be picking up your cameras and getting out there to shoot.

To help you along the way, keep in mind these many useful photography tips.

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Want more Useful Photography Tips? Click here.

The question of whether one should use TTL vs manual flash output is one that many photographers will experience at one point or another in their careers. Both methods have their advantages and disadvantages. The majority of flashes can shoot in manual mode (thought there are some that indeed can’t and there are also flashes that can do both). But not every flash can fire in TTL mode.

TTL communication requires specific pins on the camera hot shoe and flash to communicate and relay information about the exposure to make the two work together.

In general, TTL has been the king when it comes to photojournalism, weddings, events, and sports. But in situations where you are trying to mix ambient lighting with natural lighting, TTL can be a godsend and eliminate the need for specific metering that will need to be done. In my apartment, I sometimes like shooting a subject in front of a window. Evenly illuminating the subject while properly exposing the outside can be tough, but it is a challenge very easily done by using TTL metering.

Manual light output is typically used on editorial, portrait, headshot, commercial, and fine art photo situations where someone can take their time and set a scene up. It gives the photographer specific control over the light to make it look brighter or darker or exactly the way that they want it. In contrast, a TTL system will read your camera meter and adapt itself to deliver a result that you may not necessarily want.

Manual lighting also works best when working with large light modifiers as a TTL light can sometimes not work so effectively based on various parameters like how large a light modifier is and how far it is positioned from a subject.

Keep this in mind when you’re shooting, and be sure to also check out our massive lighting tutorial roundup.