First Impressions: Lumu Power Light Meter

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Last year, Lumu launched a Kickstarter for a brand new Light meter for the iPhone that would be able to meter color, ambient light, and flash output. For anyone that uses a light meter of any sort, this sounds wonderful (sans being able to trigger a monolight via the meter). At Photokina 2016, I finally got the chance to see their unicorn product: the Lumu Power. The company claims that it will be delivered this November, and that they’ve had a number of holdups along the way. Sure, they’re late on delivering their Kickstarter promises, but they’re now ready to get it out to the public.

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Olympus Announces New E-PL8 Pen, 25mm f1.2 PRO, and More!

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At Photokina 2016, Olympus is announcing their new 25mm f1.2 PRO lens in addition to many other long awaited products including the new Olympus Pen E-PL8 mirrorless camera. The camera is pretty compact and sleek, and boasts a load of features like a 180 flip screen for selfies, wifi, premium dials, rounder edges for your hands, leather textures, a touch screen, and so much more. One of the biggest features has to do with Video and how they work with Wifi.

Then there are new lenses like the ED 12-100mm f4 IS PRO lens which will be about the size of the company’s 12-40mm f2.8 PRO lens. It will also boast 5-axis stabilization with what Olympus claims to be 6.5 stops of shutter compensation.

Even more exciting though is their new 25mm f1.2 Pro lens coming in at $1,199.99. Olympus made a special design for this lens that moves only a single element when autofocusing. It’s also completely weather sealed and will ship in October. More details are after the jump.

 

 

 

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The Phoblographer Answers: Why Does Film Have Weird Colors at Night?

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Sigma 85mm f1.4 EX with Kodak Portra 400 (4 of 11)

Very recently, we were asked about how to use film at night time. The reason: during the day a standard roll of color film will come out looking very nice and true to life. But at night, you don’t get quite the same results. So why gives? If you’re a digital photographer that later picked up film (the same way many of us did) then it’s easy for you to get super confused and possibly not even think about what’s going on here.

But in truth, it has everything to do with the white balance that you’d easily adjust in digital post production.

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Review: Sony 70-300mm f4.5-5.6 G OSS (Sony E Mount, Full Frame)

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Sony 70-300mm f4.5-5.6 FE lens review (1 of 10)ISO 4001-60 sec at f - 2.8

There is very little on the market that can truly be compared to the Sony 70-300mm f4.5-5.6 G OSS lens; and for that reason it’s truly considered something unique. Very little, if anything at all, even compares to this lens in the mirrorless camera world.

For a little over $1,000 you’re getting a dust and splash resistant lens with quite a zoom range and a fairly compact size. Sure, it’s not an internal zooming lens but it’s still not too bad. On top of that, it’s designed for full frame mirrorless cameras. Considering Sony’s reputation, you can bet that it’s also going to be pretty darn good.

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MEAT: 5 Tips for Better Pictures

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This is a guest blog post from Xavier D. Buendia. It and the images here are being syndicated with exclusive permission to the Phoblographer.

In the last couple of days I was exposed to meat in all its forms as I had several different shoots with it as the main subject. From a “simple” Sunday roast at a pub to a review of a Brazilian rodizio restaurant. A t-bone on a barbecue with some friends and a shoot at a steakhouse finishing with another review at a top steak restaurant… all in less than 10 days! These made me come to a conclusion: grilled, braised, slow cooked, or on a barbecue; meat can be a pain in the neck to photograph.

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How to Make the Most of Your Flash With No Light Modifiers for Portraits

Approximately the same side due to how soft the lighting is

When you’re getting into portraiture and you’re a photographer on a budget, sometimes you don’t have the money to buy umbrellas, softboxes, etc. So the best things for you to generally do is learn how to photograph someone with a flash firing directly at them. This is what lots of shooters do, and sometimes it delivers awesome results but other times it really doesn’t.

After shooting for years on sometimes a shoestrong budget, I’ve learned how to do less with more. Here’s how.

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Lighting Basics: How to Light Portraits with a Beauty Dish

To a certain extent, a flash duration that is very fast can also give the same effects as less ambient light. This works best at the camera's max sync speed with your flash. Model: Asta Peredes.

So far, we’ve covered how to light portraits with an umbrella, an octabank and a softbox–today we’re focusing on the beauty dish. Beauty dishes were used mostly by fashion and portrait photographers for a while and for the most part they still are. They’re designed to give a very specific soft look that is directional and uses light in an inefficient way. The look has been characterized as being like a softbox and an umbrella at the same time. That’s part of the beauty of a beauty dish–pun totally intended. There are lots that are available about there, and you can easily hack them to do what you want too.

So let’s get into it!

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