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Chris Gampat the Phoblographer Zeiss 35mm f2 review images (1 of 5)ISO 4001-800 sec at f - 5.6

One of the biggest things that you’ll learn as a photographer is how to meter correctly. Something that I’ve personally learned is that no camera in the world can tell me what I want. And if you’re a computer programmer, you know that any machine can’t think: it can only do what you tell it to. So in order to figure out how to get your image to look the way that you originally thought, you need to figure out how to expose a scene according to what you want. We’re refraining from saying the word “proper exposure” because no exposure at all is proper–it’s only what you want it to be.

So what do you need to remember? Check out our tips below.

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Want more Useful Photography Tips? Check them out here.

Lots of folks say that you should only use a flash during the evening hours and in dark situations. But the truth of the matter is that during the daytime is perhaps the best time to use flash. For example, let’s say that you want to photograph someone and there is bright sunlight in the scene. If you make them face the sun, they’ll squint a lot. Conversely, if you make them not face the sun, you’ll need to overexpose a lot to get the details on their face–which is called backlighting. The solution then is to backlight the subject and expose normally while illuminating their front with a flash. That way, you get a more balanced image overall in terms of exposure ratings.

But besides this, using a flash during the day only adds to the beauty that natural light can deliver. It can bring out details in your subject that you wouldn’t see otherwise (specular highlights) and it can also fill in shadows when done correctly to give a very beautiful and shadowless look. But to do this, you’ll need to either set your flash to the widest zoom head angle or bounce it off of  very wide surface. Alternatively, you could also use a softbox of some sort.

When adding flash to a daylight scene, it’s best to add it a little bit at a time–gradually making it stronger until you feel that you have something close to the image that you want.

Try this quick tip, and be sure to check out our other bite sized useful photography tips.

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Lots of pitches and emails come our way everyday, but it’s rare that something truly pulls me out of bed from my afternoon nap. And for that, we have to give ti to the Bouncelite. The Bouncelite is a brand new Kickstarter initiative aimed at creating a completely brand new type of flash modifier that makes some of the most efficient use of lighting that we’ve seen. It mounts onto the head of your flash and acts as a softbox but can also act as a bounce card at the same time. At the moment, it’s currently being targeted at folks who put the flash in their hot shoe; though it can surely be used with the softbox off camera. But for what it’s worth, photographers who want to use a flash off camera go for much larger flash modifiers and larger softboxes.

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4808_SB-700-AF-Speedlight-front Many think of flash as a tool you use only when there isn’t enough available light to shoot with. If it’s dark, simply pop up the built-in flash and make the photograph. Never mind that the photographs don’t look especially good. The direct, hard lighting a speedlight delivers may not produce fine-art, but at least it ensures that we got something usable. However, flash can be an incredible creative tool especially when you have the flexibility of an external flash to work with. It’s an investment that provides more than just power, but choices that can improve the look of a photograph. [click to continue…]

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Lumopro LP-180 and Profoto Speedlite Speedring test with Natalie (6 of 10)ISO 12501-40 sec at f - 4.0

When a photographer is just trying to get into lighting they don’t realize a heck of a lot. It can also be very tough–and that’s why lots of them also say that they’re a natural light photographer. But just like riding a bike without training wheels, it takes some practice. As you continue to experiment with lighting, you’ll get better and better after trying it out and experimenting with what it can do.

Here are some basics to keep in mind.

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IbarionexPhoblographerEvalLight01

We are dependant on light to make our photographs. So, it is important to learn to evaluate the quality of light that we have to work with to determine the final look of our photographs. Identifying and recognizing the qualities of the light results in us making important decisions regarding exposure, white balance and even camera position. Here are some questions to ask yourself to help you make the most of the light you have to work with whether you are photographing people, landscapes, food or abstracts.

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