How to Shoot Better Photos That Need Less Post Production

I want to get something very clear before I begin this article: there is absolutely nothing wrong with post processing and photographers should always shoot with RAW modes if possible. But at the same time, there is something absolutely very liberating about not needing to spend more time on your computer or any device working to get the images you ultimately want in the end. Some photographers are better at processing while others are better at shooting. I’ve personally spent a lot of time working in Capture One and felt it to be therapeutic–but I also acknowledge that too much time staring at a computer screen can be bad for your eyes.

So instead, shooting an image perfectly in-camera is always an option.

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Tougher Than You Think: How to Shoot in a Studio Style With Film

Shooting in a studio or studio style with film changes a lot more of the photography game than you’d think. You see, there’s no taking a photo, chimping, and saying you like the image or not. You have to get it right the first time around. There’s also a major difference in what can be done with color correction and a lot more. But the biggest thing is the fact that you and your subject will have a much greater sense of connection due to how you need to communicate a whole lot more.

In this post, we’re going to focus a bit more on the technical details.

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DIY Hack: Pop Photo Puts a Candle Jar on a Flash; Gets Experimental Results

Ever heard of a Gobo? Strobist photographers have been using them for years and years–essentially a GoBo is a go-between that modifies the light output to shape it and define it in a certain way. An umbrella and a softbox are gobos: but so could a piece of plastic or a strange glass. In fact, the utterly bored yet imaginative folks over at Pop Photo tried to do just that. But in a new series that they’re starting called “Random object lighting modifier challenge” they decided to slap a glass candle holder on the business end of a flash.

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The Elinchrom ELB-1200’s Compact Size Targets On Location Adventure Photographers

With today’s announcement of the new Elinchrom ELB-1200, the company has declared their interests in further supporting the adventure photographer whom does a whole lot of their paid work on location. The Elinchrom ELB-1200 is a special battery pack that’s only 4.5kg in weight while also boasting what the company claims to be lots of durability. Considering the aluminum housing of the redesigned flash heads, that already is starting to make sense.

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Film Review: Kodak Portra 400 (35mm and 120, Various Formats)

Years and years ago, Kodak announced something that would endure for quite a while: Kodak Portra 400. Available in the 120, 35mm, and large formats, the film was and still is incredibly popular with photographers who like shooting portraits. It’s highly valued for its muted tones–which tends to go against much of what digital photography seems to offer straight out of the camera. However, Portra is in use for much more than just this. Lots of photographers use it as their every day film because they just like it. But this tends to be more the thought process of those that shoot 35mm. At 120, you’re getting far less shots per roll and often work to get the best photos you can in one single shot due to higher stakes–even more so than with 35mm.

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Digital to Analog: Daylight White Balance in Various Lighting Scenarios

As more and more photographers start going from digital to analog, we wanted to teach everyone about a big part of how you not only see light, but also color. Note that most film is balanced to daylight, so if you go about shooting with it in various situations, you’ll either like the results or you won’t.

So with that said, we’ve compiled a number of images from our archives showing you how colors in a scene render when using daylight white balance. This post encompasses mostly digital photos, and you should know when you go into a film lab to get your images developed, sometimes a technician will try to “fix the images”. But you should keep this in mind regardless to get your most desired results.

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The Simple First Step to Making Your Food Photography Look Better Every Time

This is one of the first steps that we’re going to teach in our Food Photography workshop later this month. It involves lighting your food in a different way and is just the first step involved with making your food photos look great. More importantly though, this is a piece of information that will help you make better lighting decisions every time.

But like everything else in photography: it isn’t always just technical info that makes a great photo.

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