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All images by Evan Thompson. Used with permission.

Underneath San Francisco is a network of old tunnels that very few photographers explore; but Photographer Evan Thompson has recently shared his photos of these very little known places with the world. He tells us that they’re still mostly a secret and that most folks keep it to themselves so as not to give away the secrets. He was inspired by the recent wave of photographers that love to go urban exploring and to places where no one else goes to.

We talked to Evan about the dangers of something like this and his creative vision in the network.

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Fujifilm 16-55mm f2.8 WR review Graham's images (15 of 19)ISO 4001-60 sec at f - 2.8

Food photography isn’t tough to do, but good quality food photography can be incredibly tough. It’s all about timing, composition, colors and lighting. Good food photography whets an appetite and elicits emotions connected to food. If you can make someone smell the Mac and Cheese that you just cooked, then you’re well on your way to making better food images.

Here’s how to go about shooting better food images by using one light and keeping it simple.

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We’ve added more sample photos to our Sigma 150-600mm f5-6.3 DG OS HSM Sport Lens first impressions post. So far though, we tested it more for portraiture than sports, but we’re going to do so! With a flash, this lens shows off nothing else but pure sharpness, and even without a flash in good lighting. The image stabilization is proving to be quite effective, but man is this thing heavy.

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Using Lighting Gradients in Lightroom (1 of 1)ISO 4001-80 sec at f - 2.8

 

While in many situations you’ll have full studio lighting control over the lights that you are working with, sometimes things go wrong on sets. For example, a bulb could blow or a scrim may not come in on set to give you the look that you want. The photo above was shot with two lights but wasn’t anywhere as brightly lit.

We always try to get everything as close to “right” in the camera as we can, but in this case we just couldn’t. That’s when the phrase, “fix it in post” became ever more apparent.

Here’s how we created this image using very weak lights and Adobe Lightroom CC to fix the photo.

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Chris Gampat Raiyan Saed's portraits (7 of 11)ISO 2001-160 sec at f - 3.2

Want more Useful Photography Tips? Click here.

When shooting portrait subjects, there are typically three lights that you talk about: a main light, a fill and a hair light. But when shooting outdoors with lots of natural light, those rules to go out the window. Your main light often becomes the sun, whether diffused or not.

This tip is a bit more advanced and requires you to build on things cumulatively. First off, when shooting outdoors, we think that you should always try to shoot in the shade where you’ve got more control over the light. After you’ve got full control of the light, you can use a flash to add in a bit of fake sun.

Look at the edge of Raiyan’s face camera right, see the light? It was a flash in a beauty dish, but gives a natural look of sunlight.

So how do you do this? Let’s recap:

– Shoot outdoors

– Use the shadows and get total control over your lighting situation

– Place a flash either with the wide angle diffuser, in a beauty dish, or in a rectangular shaped softbox to add a bit of rim lighting

To make this even more emphasized with the look of sunlight, try adding a gradient–which builds even more on other tips that we’ve done. It’s all about adding the extra rim light that looks very natural but subdued.

Give it a shot. This is something you have to do more than us telling you about it.

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Adorama Flashpoint Zoom Li-on Radio flash review (2 of 9)ISO 4001-125 sec at f - 2.8

The world of radio hot shoe flashes has been marinating for a couple of years now. The original is Quantum, but then Canon did it and Yongnuo and Phottix soon followed through. It was only a matter of time until the retailers started to create their own versions with their own house brands. Adorama’s Flashpoint series have been known for years to be extremely stellar products; and their new Zoom Li-on flash is really no exception. It isn’t really a radio flash per se, but it’s designed to be. At a mere $99.99 for the fully manual version, you’ve got very little to complain about.

With a Guide Number of 112 and an innovative type of battery for a hot shoe flash, the company also claims a 1.5 second recycle time, stroboscopic mode, front/rear curtain sync, and a modelling light.

But what makes it even more special is the fact that you can control the power output via Flashpoint’s own radio transmitter.

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