Review: KONO! Kolorit 400 Tungsten Film (35mm)

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Kono Kolorit 400 Tungsten Film 35mm product photos (3 of 3)ISO 4001-80 sec at f - 4.0

Consider the recent rise in Tungsten film and you get a great explanation for why the KONO! Kolorit 400 Tungsten Film could be so popular with portrait photographers. Like CineStill 800T, this film is a Tungsten film and designed to be shot in doors, in cloudy weather, during the night, etc. It’s very much unlike daylight film and my favorite way of using it is to often just use strobe lighting to get the best effect that I can.

Combine this with the fact that Tungsten film often delivers what are in my opinion better skin tones than Kodak Portra and the fact that emulating this look and the tones in digital is pretty tough, and you’ve got yourself a very good option to use this little analogue beauty.

Editor’s Note: This is our experimentation with a full, single page post as part of our evolving website redesign. Let us know your thoughts.

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The Hasselblad X1D is the World’s First Mirrorless Medium Format Camera

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Check out our first impressions of the camera!

For everyone that has dreamed of a digital version of the Mamiya 7 series of cameras; the Hasselblad X1D is bringing you truly one step closer to that reality. Today, the company is the announcing the world’s first mirrorless medium format camera. At the heart is a 50MP sensor with a cropped 645 sensor at the sensor area of 43.8 x 32.9mm. It’s capable of doing ISO 100 to 25,600. Additionally, it boasts dual SD card slots.

The Hasselblad X1D is handmade in Sweden and represents a totally new lineup in the company’s cameras. It has autofocus lenses, flash sync of up to 1/2000th, shoots HD video, has built in WiFi, and includes dust proof and weather proof construction.

More features are after the jump.

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The Phoblographer Explains: How TTL Flash Metering Works

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

One of the biggest things that makes no sense to me as a strobist photographer is why we don’t have any sort of universal TTL flash metering system. Instead of that, every single camera manufacturer has their own for the sake of being able to compete with one another while delivering flashes that essentially all do the same thing. It’s a hassle for photographers moving from one system to another. To understand this and my reasoning, you need to understand how TTL Flash metering works.

And trust me; it’s a whole lot simpler than you think.

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How to Buy a Flash: a Photographer’s Guide

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Shanny EX600 EF flash samples portraits (1 of 4)ISO 4001-160 sec at f - 2.8

Buying a flash for many photographers is pretty complicated. It’s simple enough for most people to understand megapixels, RAW, etc because camera manufacturers put enough marketing into it to do so. But they unfortunately don’t do enough to market their flashes and what they’re capable of. Instead, you as a photographer need to go into forums, stores, etc to figure it out.

Just like trying to explain why someone needs more megapixels or a better lens to a complete layman, it can be tougher to make someone understand why they need a new flash or how to buy one for two reasons: they don’t understand it, and they don’t understand or think creatively in terms of what it can do.

So here’s a breakdown.

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Tips For Softening Your On-Camera Flash

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It’s no secret that on-camera flash is harsh and can be very unflattering, this is true of built-in camera flash as well as add-on speedlights. This is why so many educators preach about off camera flash and how to do it, in most cases, getting the light source off your camera is thought to be paramount to improving its look. But what if you can’t take the light off your camera for whatever reason or another, what can you do to soften your on-camera light?

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Useful Photography Tip #163: Creating the Window Light Look Anywhere You Go

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Zeiss 25mm f2 Batis review sample photos (28 of 29)ISO 4001-200 sec at f - 5.0

Want more Useful Photography Tips? Click here.

One of the ideas that we teach here often on the site is about how you can augment the look of natural light by putting a flash up against a window. But now it’s time to take that step just a bit further–and all you need is an off-camera flash and a large white/translucent reflector. How large? Figure around 42 inches.

Now it can be used in one of two ways:

  • Bouncing the light from the flash off the large surface to deliver more potent light

or

  • Configuring the reflector to be translucent (shoot-through) and putting the flash on one side of the reflector and your subject on the other side.

Either way, make sure that you set your hot shoe flash head to the widest setting using the wide angle diffuser. When you do this, it’s going to cover the most surface area and when bounced off (or shot through) the reflector, it’s going to give off coverage that’s going to look similar to what a window can do.

Shooting a portrait? Have the reflector to the side of your subject and a little bit above. Shooting food? Well have the reflector to the side and way above.

Go give it a shot and as always, have fun shooting!

 

 

Review: Tamron 90mm f2.8 Di VC USD (Canon EF)

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Tamron 90mm f2.8 Di VC USD review product photos (7 of 7)ISO 8001-50 sec at f - 4.0

Tamron knocked the ball out of the park with their 85mm f1.4 Di VC USD lens–and so updating the 90mm f2.8 Di VC USD, one of their more popular options just made sense. This lens is very much a jack of many trades. It’s designed to shoot macro images, have image stabilization, great image quality, and also has weather sealing. For many years it was in the hands of enthusiasts and hobbyists, but the 90mm is worthy of being in the hands of many professionals.

This one, like many of the company’s new lenses, offer a metal exterior, weather sealing, 9 aperture blades, 14 elements in 11 groups and 4.5 stops of vibration compensation. For the $649 price point you’re getting quite a bargain..

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Review: Godox Thinklite TT685S TTL (Sony)

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Godox Thinklite TT685S TTL product photos (2 of 13)ISO 4001-125 sec at f - 2.0

The Godox Thinklite TT685S TTL is a flash that I’ve honestly been waiting for for a very long time. While Sony has announced their own radio transmitter and receiver to work with their own flashes, sometimes all you need is a really good an affordable flash and transmitter. Seriously, how do you beat $165 for a flash and a transmitter that both have solid build quality?

But that’s not all that this flash has. It’s got a radio receiver built in, TTL, groups, channels, manual control, multi-stroboscopic flash abilities, and full incorporation with what Sony’s platform offers.

If you’re a strobist, looking for a budget friendly option and the most bang for your buck for your Sony camera with a multi-interface shoe, then you’d honestly be stupid not purchase this–and I say that with complete and total honesty.

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