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Pinhole coastline

Pinhole photography requires you to think about motion, careful composition, and at the same time be willing to experiment with your luck. You’re often shooting at a lower ISO setting and with an extremely narrow aperture to create the images that you get. Most of it is also quite wide, too. But to get better pinhole photos, what you need to do is think about your scenes and start seeing the world in a totally different way considering that your camera isn’t capturing a more conventional image.

And if you’re looking for cameras, then check out these modern and DIY cameras.

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Film–the mention of it either makes photographers gawk at it due to antiquation or makes them become stirred with butterflies in the stomach. The use of film has declined steadily as the digital age has progressed, and with that many films have been discontinued due to a decrease in sales. Instead, many tend to look to Instagram and other programs for filters that give digital images the look of film.

With the world moving deeper and deeper into the digital realm, we asked film manufacturers how the industry has changed in the past five years.

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We all know that it’s trendy to be a photographer these days–and now you can wear that on your sleeve. Anastasia over at the Asilida store has created a number of fun patches for photographers that shoot film and want to show it off. These patches can be put on your clothing, camera bags, jacket and anywhere else that you can think of that you’d want to place them.

These patches are surely for the more fashionable amongst the photography world; especially as they add a little bit of extra flair to showcase your identity.

And no, the Asilda Patches won’t cost you a lot of money. In fact, they’re pretty darn affordable. More photos are after the jump.

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Canon 7D Mk II review images portraits Bec (1 of 1)ISO 2501-250 sec at f - 4.0

Instant Film Formats are in some ways more plentiful than negative film. Though they’re much more specialized, Instant film is used by both professional and enthusiast alike when they want a specific look. For years now there have been many different formats for many different needs. In fact, Instant Film was made in large format for a while before being discontinued. What’s leftover is mostly tailored for the person looking for a specific look to their images.

Here’s a rundown of all the modern Instant Film formats.

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03 - Wet plate photography class

All images by Jack Baldwin. Used with permission

Jack Baldwin is a journalist by day, and uses digital cameras for his work. But he began his journey into film photography when he moved from Australia to California and purchased a medium format film camera. When he moved back to Australia, he started his journalism career, which was about getting the shot and filing as soon as possible. But with film, Jack found something more.

“I shoot film because it’s the antithesis of that. I can take my time, I don’t have to stress, it doesn’t have to be something that sits nicely next to a headline.” states Jack. “It’s just the photo I want to take.”

It eventually turned into him going to workshops and experimenting with many, many more formats. Jack tells us that it makes you think that much more about composition and framing.

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Want more Useful Photography Tips? Click here.

Years before light meters were invented and used by photographers, they used a specific set of rules to figure out what their camera’s exposure settings should be adjusted to. Today, this method is still used by some film photographers and very much so by street photographers.

What are we talking about? It’s called the Sunny 16 rule–and it’s the basis for how the Phoblographer tests a camera’s metering system.

So how do you do it? The Sunny 16 rule states that on a bright sunny day with little shadows your scene will be exposed at f16 and your shutter speed will be the reciprocal of your ISO. So that means that if my film is ISO 100, then I’ll be shooting at 1/100th and f16 on a bright sunny day with little shadows. From there, you figure out the other parameters based on how much sunlight is affecting the scene. Is it getting a bit cloudy? Then open up to f11. Even more shade? Then go down to f8. In the NYC subway system? Well, you’re going to have to get really low down in the settings.

So why would you do this? By simply looking to a scene and knowing what the exposure will be, you won’t need to fully rely on a light meter or your camera’s metering and instead you’ll be able to figure out what the exposure will be. In turn, this will get you the image that you want in a much faster process.