Our Analog Zine Kickstarter Ends in a Few Days. You Can Still Donate!

Hi everyone,

This is one of our last reminders: our Analog photography zine Kickstarter is now fully funded. Again, a big thank you to everyone who made this possible. It means a whole lot to us. However, if you still want one and were afraid to donate before, you’ve got no worries now. At this point, you’re essentially just buying a zine with the option of also getting a subscription to La Noir Image.

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Understanding The Differences Between Darkroom Prints And Digital Prints

Screenshots taken from video. 

While digital photography has taken over film in terms of popularity, there is a recent rise of film shooters, reviving the traditional process of analog photography. However, due to sheer convenience and accessibility issues, many films were developed, scanned digitally and printed by commercial or digital ink-jet printers. This was in stark contradiction to the original full workflow of film that involves the manual labor and expertise of darkroom printing. Therefore, what are the differences between full analog darkroom printing process versus the modern day, digital commercial printing? We have found a useful video on Youtube to compare and contrast results obtained from both digital and darkroom printing.

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Why The Analog Photography World is a Far Nicer Place Than Digital

Years and years ago, there were film photographers who loved taking their lenses and cameras into labs and testing the results with charts and such. For the most part, that still happens with digital. But modern analog and film photography has evolved. Lots of people are turned off by it, but also lots of people are incredibly attracted to it for its freedom of expression and the amount of raw talent that goes into creating a photo in-camera without Photoshopping or Lightroom work. Sure, lots of the same things done in Lightroom can be done in the darkroom, but that’s just when you’re printing. Instead, modern analog is more about the art: and a million times better than modern digital.

Before I go on, this isn’t a battle of digital vs film, digital vs analog, etc.

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Sunny 16, Seeing Light, and Improving Your Digital Photography with Analog Techniques

Pro Tip: The Sunny 16 rule dictates that, on a perfectly shadowless sunny day, you set your aperture to f16 and your shutter speed becomes the reciprocal of your ISO to get the perfect light meter reading.

In our digital world, being able to see our images on an LCD or EVF screen moments after pressing the shutter, the art of being able to see light, to know the approximate exposure of a scene prior to taking a shot, is all a dying art. But back in analog film days this was an essential piece to a photographer’s process. Continue reading…

Why I Built a 90mm 4×5 Film Pinhole Camera

All photos and blog post by Julian L. Used with permission.

 

I first got into photography with a Kodak Instamatic 126 when I was about 5 or 6 years old. I absolutely loved it, it was magical to me at that age. I actually recently bought the same camera off eBay to run some 35mm film through it. After a few years I graduated onto a Voigtlander Vitoret D and my dad found at a car boot sale. It was cheap because the shutter was jammed, but dad fixed it for me. I ‘helped’ with the repair (watched and tried not to get in the way, I must have been about 7 or 8 at the time). The shutter mechanism absolutely fascinated me. I remember dad explaining aperture and shutter speed to me, because the camera was unmetered. It took a little while to get used to it, but got there in the end. Anyway I had several other cameras, but I always remember these two. The Instamatic introduced me to photography and the Voigtlander taught me the importance of exposure.

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Digital to Analog: Daylight White Balance in Various Lighting Scenarios

As more and more photographers start going from digital to analog, we wanted to teach everyone about a big part of how you not only see light, but also color. Note that most film is balanced to daylight, so if you go about shooting with it in various situations, you’ll either like the results or you won’t.

So with that said, we’ve compiled a number of images from our archives showing you how colors in a scene render when using daylight white balance. This post encompasses mostly digital photos, and you should know when you go into a film lab to get your images developed, sometimes a technician will try to “fix the images”. But you should keep this in mind regardless to get your most desired results.

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A Look at How Digital Cameras Lose Their Value Compared to Film Bodies

If you’ve even decided to click on this article then you’re probably aware of some of the frustrations some of your fellow photographers feel. Let’s preface this: four or five years ago you may have purchased a Fujifilm X Pro 1. Last year it was updated, giving it a sufficient four year life span. Now you want to upgrade, and you’re finding they’re still going for at a ridiculously low price brand new and only a few hundred used. But the newer cameras like the Fujifilm X Pro 2 costs around $1,699. Fujifilm isn’t exclusive to this: so too is Sony and the Micro Four Thirds coalition.

Now if you look at some of the film camera bodies, you’ll start to realize just how well they hold their value–especially if the system is still current.

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