So Uhhhhh, The Minolta Brand is Back and Making Cameras?!

One of the brands of cameras you would absolutely never think would come back from the dead is Minolta. But according to Photo Rumors your lack of belief in zombies is wrong! Elite Brands, the makers of both Rokinon and Samyang, has seemingly struck a sort of licensing agreement to use the name brand. With that said, brand new Minolta cameras are currently on sale at Amazon. For those of you who knew and used Minolta cameras, you probably also remember they had a few digital camera models. But that’s what makes this even weirder.

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October 15th: Join Us at the Great NYC Film Photography Gathering

Hey folks,

This October 15th, we encourage you to come out and join us at the Great NYC Film Photography Gathering! This isn’t a film photography photo walk, or a workshop, but instead a film photography meetup. We’ve teamed up with Lomography NYC and Brooklyn Film Camera for this event and are tentatively planning to hold it in Brooklyn’s fantastic Prospect Park. Our hope is that there will be loads of fantastic colors from the park, the leaves, etc. Come, hang out with a bunch of other film photographers, talk about your gear, talk about the stuff you shoot, photograph one another, photograph things, go on your own mini-photo walk in the park, and overall just enjoy yourself and embrace the revived analog renaissance we’re currently experiencing.

Please RSVP to the Facebook event to be kept in the loop. More details are below.

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Film Review: Fujifilm Superia (200, 400, 800 and 1600)

Fujifilm Superia is oddly enough considered a consumer film. Why? I’m not exactly sure–especially considering that it wasn’t so long ago in history that every photojournalist swore by Superia 800. But nevertheless, Fujifilm Superia isn’t considered to be one of the more professional grade films as something like say Fujifilm Pro400H. But if you head into various Flickr and Facebook groups, lots of photographers still pledge allegiance to Fujifilm Superia. The film comes in a variety of speeds including ISO 200, ISO 400, ISO 800 and ISO 1600. In some ways, you can perhaps liken it to being a bit like Ilford Delta–except that it’s color and from Fujifilm.

But one thing is for sure, if you want great general use film, Fujifilm Superia is a fantastic option.

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An Update to the Ricoh GR II: Will There Ever Be a New Ricoh GR III?

The updated Ricoh GR III could potentially be nothing more than just a myth, but it still stands as a fact that the Ricoh GR II is a popular choice for many street photographers. This isn’t to be confused with the older iteration of this camera, which Eric Kim reviewed for us years ago, but instead an updated version of the Ricoh GR II. The camera is a cult hit with this genre for a number of reasons including the small size, fantastic image quality and the pretty silent operation coupled with great ergonomics.

It’s been a number of years since the Ricoh GR II was announced and so it’s a bit odd the camera hasn’t been updated in a long time. Fixed lens cameras and point and shoots typically have shorter life spans, but the 16MP sensor inside the Ricoh GR II is still capable of putting out very sharp images. We’ve even featured photographers who shoot with it here on the blog.

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App Review: LightLeaker (Apple iOS, Apple iPhone 6s)

Very few apps really make me want to review them, but in the case of LightLeaker I’m more than eager to do so. LightLeaker joins the list with LensDistortions and RNI Films as some of my favorite apps for iOS that appeal to the photographer who wants much more than what the current suite of editing platforms offer simply because of their emphasis on creating a clinically perfect photo. I’m a person who loves the aesthetics of disposable cameras, souped film, scratched lenses, etc. Essentially, I really am in the pursuit of something that modern digital photography just doesn’t give me due to an engineer’s goals being much different than mine.

I’ve learned how to find perfection in imperfections.

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Film Emulsion Review: Kodak Portra 160 (35mm and 120 Formats)

When you work with a film like Kodak Portra 160, you get a pretty fine detailed film designed to be used more or less with controlled lighting. Though interestingly enough, I’ve personally had much better results working with many other films using controlled lighting and instead found that this film is one of the best to be used with natural light. Designed for skin tones in portraiture, Kodak Portra 160 has a very muted color palette but not as pastel as Fujifilm’s Pro 160 NS–its closest competitor which is now discontinued. Like many other films, it is available in both 120 and 35mm. But if you’re reading this website, then you’re probably only using it in 120.

I’ve been using Kodak Portra 160 for years; and even though I prefer to work with 400, 160 is surely a nice film in the right settings.

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Joseph Henry Lengson: Elegant and Sophisticated Portraits as a Goal

All images and text by Joseph Henry Lengson. Used with permission.

My name is Joseph and I’m a photographer here in Los Angeles, but I work consistently between Los Angeles and New York. I’m a fan of The Phoblographer and I’ve been a subscriber for years. I typically read The Phoblographer on my iPad/iPhone everyday but recently read on the website on my MacBook and saw that this publication offers the possibility to be featured on the website, and I got inspired to reach out to see if this could be a possibility for me!

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Hacking a 90 Year Old Zeiss Camera Using Legos to Shoot Fujifilm Instax

This is probably the oldest Lego Camera in the world. This is my latest attempt to revive a 90 years old camera using Lego bricks together with instant films. Not too many people would have experience to use a camera with 90 years old. Most of these cameras are put on display shelves or in basement. I hope this project can bring them back to the real world and make them relevant again.

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