Review: Lumu Power Light Meter (Apple iPhone)

For years and years, I always wondered why no one had any sort of flash enabled light meter available for the iPhone; but then Lumu went and got the Lumu Power Kickstarted. It may have taken quite a long time, but it’s finally out the door. The Lumu Power light meter is designed for the photographer that wants and needs to use a light meter but that doesn’t want to carry around an actual light meter. Instead, they want something small that they can tote around and use whenever they want or need. Plus it simply works with your iPhone. So why would you not want one?

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This Underwater 8×10 Camera System Will Only Cost You $5,800

All images used courtesy of the eBay listing

To add a bit of extra sparkle to your photographic hobby, consider channelling your inner 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea and picking up this Underwater 8×10 camera system off of eBay. Yes, that’s right–you’d be shooting 8×10 film sheets under water. Pretty crazy, right? When you think of film cameras and going underwater, it isn’t unusual for the Nikonos to come up or even the Fujifilm underwater disposable cameras. But it isn’t every day that you consider something above medium format.

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How to Get the Soft Focus Look in Your Photos Using Adobe Lightroom (Free Presets)

One of the popular photo looks these days is the soft focus look; and for many photographers it’s tough to get it just right unless you really understand what’s going on. The soft focus look is based on what photographers used to produce years ago in the film days. Some photographers achieved it by putting stockings over the front of the lens or rubbing vaseline on a piece of glass then putting that in front of the lens. Other photographers do it by scratching a lens up a whole lot to kill the sharpness and details the lens can produce.

I’m pretty positive you don’t want to scratch up some glass, so here’s how you can get the look using Adobe Lightroom.

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The Noob’s Guide to Choosing a Medium Format Film Camera

This guide is a guest blog post from photographer Marcin Wajda on choosing a medium format film camera based on just a few of the best offerings out there. Enjoy!

Disclaimer: You don’t have to agree with anything I put down here.

Disclaimer 2: I’m talking about interchangeable lens SLRs here. You can apply some of those principles to selecting a TLR or a rangefinder, but you’d probably be better off asking someone who uses those types of cameras.

I decided to write this, because the topic seems to be pretty popular these days. People ask “What camera?” and sadly, the answers are boiling down to “Get this one, because I use it and what’s good for me is definitely going to be good for you”, which, I think we can agree, is bullshit.

Let’s begin then.

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Useful Photography Tip #179: The Golden Rules of Working with Film

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When it comes to working with film, there are a number of photographers who have obviously done it for years already. But interestingly enough, you don’t apply the same techniques necessarily that you would with digital photography. So here’s what you can do and the Golden Rules of Working with Film Photography:

  • Slide film: Expose for the highlights, but personally I like to overexpose just a tad due to the way that I light.
  • Color Negative film: Overexpose the film by around a stop. I’ve found great success in then developing normally.
  • Black and White: Lots of photographers like exposing for the shadows and developing for the highlights. Personally, I tend to shoot a lot of black and white film the box speed or giving it a bit more light or less light depending on my personal tastes. But with some films, you may not want to underexpose them–like Japan Camera Hunter Street Pan 400 which is a near infrared film that needs a lot of light.

That’s it! Good luck!

Four Super Sharp Black and White Film Emulsions Worthy of a Good Lens

Film photography is highly valued for the certain sense of softness it can deliver vs digital. But under the right circumstances, black and white film can be used to create and capture photos that are incredibly sharp. In fact, they can easily rival what digital is capable of. Believe it or not, lots of the methods that one uses for digital photography to make a sharp photo can easily be applied to film. So if you’re looking to get some of the sharpest photos you’ve ever shot, check out these four fantastic film emulsions.

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How Closely Does Fujifilm Acros Compare To the Digital Film Simulation?

This is a syndicated blog post from our premium publication La Noir Image. Subscribe for as little as $15 for access and free presets; $40/year gets you all that and a tutorial video coming soon; $100/year gets this and a portfolio critique with Chris.

One question that lots of photographers who have shot film wonder about is how closely Fujifilm’s film simulations closely mimic the look of film. Considering how Fujifilm created Acros, it would make a whole lot of sense that their digital simulation would be the closest thing possible to the film, right? Well, that depends on a number of different situations.Fujifilm Neopan Acros can take on different looks based on how you shot it and how you develop it. For example, Rodinal may make it look one way vs another developer. Then you’ll need to consider how the images were obviously shot, how you’re lighting them, etc. To get a better idea though, we’ve been using Acros 100 in a number of situations plus we looked at one digital preset to see how it performed vs Fujifilm’s option.

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Brock Saddler Shows You How to Hack the Bronica ETRS to Shoot Fujifilm Instax Mini Film

“Not for the Bronica unfortunately, unless you could possibly bring the tripod mount into it, rigging something to the back to hold it in place,” says photographer Brock Saddler (follow him on Instagram) about his Bronica ETRS hack when I asked him about whether or not he’d still need to use the rubber bands. “…something for the next person to think about.” Brock is amongst the many photographers and hackers we’ve interviewed here on the Phoblographer. His hack specifically has to do with the Bronica ETRS. Last year, we interviewed him about hacking his Bronica ETRS to shoot Fujifilm Instax mini film and he was still in the process of refining it. But he got really close to making it absolutely perfect.

Brock, unfortunately, has no plans to make it commercially viable. “This was just something to do on a rainy day,” he tells us. And to that end, he’s given us permission to share his post on how he did it.

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