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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Asus ux501 laptop (3 of 9)ISO 4001-100 sec at f - 2.8

Don’t put every image that you shoot into your portfolio.

That’s the very first thing that I find myself telling photographers who pitch their work to the site and unfortunately don’t get featured. Figuring out which photos should go into your portfolio can be tough to do unless you know how to think and emotionally remove yourself from the photo itself.

To build a better portfolio, you have to keep shooting and then become a slave to the camera and your own creative ideas. It’s how you’ll get better and continue to evolve and change your work. But there are loads of things to think about when actually putting the photo portfolio together to show off to the world.

Here’s what you should consider, though it surely isn’t the end all be all list.

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All images by Ruben Juan. Used with permission.

Ruben Juan is a 22 year old graphic designed based in Valencia, Spain. He’s spent a big part of his life taking photos and these days works as a freelance photographer for skateboarding magazines and companies.

He’s sometimes known as “Rbnisonfire” online, and indeed, his images live up to this name. Recently, Ruben has been working on a series called Subterranean Kids where he followed young men into the underground parts of Spain and photographed them as they did tricks with their skateboards.

Dangerous? Yes. Super cool? Heck yes.

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OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Though Olympus Air has already been announced in Japan, the little camera that might is finally coming to the US. Very similar to Sony’s QX series of cameras, the Olympus Air product line is an open source camera that takes Micro Four Thirds lenses and is essentially just the sensor, lens mount, WiFi electronics, and a button crammed into ergonomics that will remind you of a can of Burt’s Bees skin moisturizer. The open source designation means that app developers can actually develop apps for the system to make it better.

The Olympus Air A01 is the company’s first offering and has the same 16MP four thirds sensor that many of the company’s other cameras have. However, it doesn’t have Image stabilization in order to keep the unit small. If you mount Panasonic’s lenses that have IS built in though, you’ll get the image stabilization that your shaky hands crave so badly. When it links up with your phone, tablet or phablet you’ll be able to see what the camera sees on a giant screen.

The camera also has focus peaking, which means that all your manual glass will work fine. Additionally, with the electronic shutter the camera can shoot at 1/16,000 of a second and therefore give the user almost no trouble shooting with a lens wide open in sunlight at a lower ISO setting. The Air A01 can shoot 10 fps, has RAW capture, and uses a Micro SD card.

Pretty much everything that you’d expect with an Olympus Micro Four Thirds camera is transferred to the phone when they let their powers combine.

The Olympus Air A01 will be available in the United States in July 2015 in Black or White for $299.99 (body only) or $499.99 paired with a 14-42mm EZ lens, and in Canada in August 2015 in Black or White for $399.99 (body only) or $599.99 paired with a 14-42mm EZ lens. More photos are after the jump.

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Fujifilm 16mm f1.4 review lead image (1 of 1)ISO 4001-125 sec at f - 6.3

A while back, Fujifilm announced that they’d be updating the X-T1 with a brand new firmware update that significantly boosts the autofocus performance. The Fujifilm X-T1 doesn’t have terrible focusing performance to begin with, but now they’re stating that it’s much better than it was before. The new firmware 4.00 includes new wide and tracking methods as well as performance boosts to single AF point focusing.

For portrait photographers, the camera will now have an Eye Detection focusing option too.

The full details are after the jump, and you can download the firmware right here.

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Before we begin this article, let’s make this clear: never call yourself a natural light photographer. But beyond that, know the basics. Portraiture is hard enough but actually make the most of natural lighting is really a skill. It isn’t as simple as going out there and just shooting. Indeed, knowing how to use natural light in the best ways has to do with actually knowing how to look at light and judge how it will appear in an image.

Though we always tell folks to learn how to use a flash, here’s how to make the most of what you have if all you have is natural light.

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All images by Mark Richardson. Used with permission.

Photographer Mark Richardson has an awesome tutorial video showing off how you can get those awesome water splash photos with a simple lighting setup. Mark uses an expensive lens, but you don’t need it to get these types of photos.

He has a two light setup with large soft boxes and he goes about capturing the splashes by activating the camera and flash by hand. It’s also possible to do this with the Triggertrap flash adapter and sound shutter release, but this method is what many photographers have been doing for years and it involves Photoshop.

What’s key here is that the monolights that Mark is using have a fast flash duration. What that does is stops the fastest of motions in a scene to allow you to get the crispest and sharpest image that you possibly can. In fact, if Mark were to shoot a two second long exposure and synced his water toss with the flash, he would have gotten the same results because the flash is stopping the super fast motion. Indeed, fast flash durations are super cool to work with–and they’re not be confused with high speed sync.

To be honest, this is actually some of the funnest stuff that you can do with lighting and without a model in the frame. Give it a try this weekend and be sure to check out the video after the jump.

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