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The Phoblographer Solargraph (2 of 2)

All images by Oli Stevens. Used with permission.

We’ve featured long solargraphs shot with beer cans before, but every time we run across new ones we find something incredibly fascinating. Take this 10 week Solargraph shot by photographer Oli Stevens. Oli is a Biochemistry Masters student, splitting his time between London and Oxford. He’s primarily a 35mm analog photographer who enjoys pushing the technical limits of film photography. What other way to push them than to play with a super long exposure and to work with the most experimental form of the craft: pinhole photography.

To create the image above, Oli created his very own camera from a beer can and used Ilford sheet film to shoot the image. We talked to him more about the setup, the camera, and his photography.

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Dancer with second curtain flash

Dramatizing movement is one of the coolest things that you can do in a photograph that otherwise captures it all in a single frame. While many photographers love to do this with long exposures, adding a strobe element via second curtain flash can create even more drama. When you add second curtain flash, what the camera does is freeze a specific moment in the image while dramatizing the movement of the rest of it. It’s a lot of fun–and we do it occasionally in our reviews.

Photographer Phillip McCordall created a tutorial video last month showing us a very proper and fairly old school way ot creating a photo like this in a studio setting with a dancer. He combined second curtain flash usage with a slower shutter speed and just the right aperture and ISO mixture to create the images that you’ll see in the video below.

Want to try this for yourself? We recommend grabbing a dancer or a ballerina. But this can be done with a lot more than just them. I’ve done this with fire dancers and athletes before. You’ll just need to think in terms of a long exposure for the most part.

Mr. McCordall’s video on photographing dancers with long exposures and second curtain flash is after the jump.

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pentax-645z-review-dylandsara-0021

Editor’s Note: this review was syndicated from photographer duo Dylan and Sara with permission. All images and text are theirs.

The last week was spent shooting a few thousand frames through the Pentax 645z. This is Pentax’s new somewhat-affordable medium format system. We wanted to take a real world approach to how we would shoot the camera, so this review will be less technical and more about how it performed on the job.  We took it to a full wedding, a weeks worth of portrait sessions and a night shoot.

Medium format digital cameras have been on our mind lately and this did not let us down. This is one of the many current medium format offerings to use the 51mp CMOS sensor produced by Sony. This new CMOS sensor is a huge deal for the way we shoot, mainly because it allows useable high-iso and live view, this wasn’t possible with the previous generation of medium format digitals.

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Tamron 70-200mm f2.8 VC image samples (22 of 36)ISO 2001-100 sec at f - 2.8

There are many, many photographers that wish they were simply an observer and that no one would pay them any attention. And as many often try to be those photographers, unfortunately they get noticed. The main reason for this: combine the fact that the photographer is super nervous, the subject being photographed doesn’t know the photographer, and that the photographer is trying so hard to just get a photo and get out.

If you put all of these together, the photographer instead is more like the mosquito that you’re trying to swat because you don’t want the West Nile virus.

Instead, being this type of mythical photographer requires patience and mastery of your body language.

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer's Introduction to Pinhole Photography (1 of 1)ISO 4001-50 sec at f - 2.8

Pinhole cameras are interesting in that they force the photographer to look at a scene and envision is in a long exposure with a certain softness. But those amongst the pinhole community know that all you generally need is a container to hold the film with no light leaks, a small hole in said container with a cover to act as a shutter, and that’s about it. The cool thing is that you can make pinhole cameras from almost anything: like a beer can for example.

In fact, many photographers try to custom make their own pinhole cameras for creativity purposes.

The video below is a simple step by step tutorial on how to create a pinhole camera of your own and tells you how they work. Indeed, they can create very beautiful and haunting images in the hands of the right person and many folks opt for using black and white film over anything else.

Check out the video after the jump.

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Essentials the Location Shooter (10 of 10)ISO 2001-80 sec

Are you excited? You’re about to make your first big photography purchase. When purchasing a new camera, lens, lights, or anything else photographically related you’ll most likely be spending quite a bit of money. Photography is an expensive hobby and an even more expensive profession, so you’re going to need to hunker down and do quite a bit of research. We’re not just talking about gear purchases–we also mean that you’ll need to do a lot of learning. But before you even get started in doing that, you’ll need to figure out the answer to a lot of questions.

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