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All images by Ray Panduro. Used with permission

Photographer Ray Panduro runs a blog called Pixel Analogo. He recently messaged us to show us one of his creations: a pinhole camera formed in the shape of a Diana, but completely made of cardboard. “I love to do photography DiY stuff and share what I know about the topic in my blog. I found that it is complicated to find content in Spanish, especially about analog photography so this is my way to share my love about photography,” says Mr. Panduro. “I have built in the past some pinhole cameras but it was not until this year that I wanted to do something different. I wanted to take more pinhole photos and with that building the cameras using simple materials, not just do the ordinary pinhole oatmeal or box camera I wanted to replicate the common film cameras that wanted me to grab them every day and shoot.”

Ray states that he chose the Diana because he actually owns one and so replicating it was the simplest for him. He also chose it because 120 film is one of the simplest to use for pinhole photography due to always knowing how many frames you have left to shoot with a little back window on the camera. “No need to waste film guessing how much film you need to advance with the knob.”

The camera works by a sliding shutter that moves sideways with an aperture is f/150 for the Diana for its 40mm focal length for a 6×6 film frame. More images of the camera and images from the camera are after the jump.

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In Action

Need an easy way to make a monopod?

Purchase a 1/4 X20 screw about 1/2 in long (or the size screw of your tripod mounting hole on the bottom of your camera), and take a strong cord or strap (what every you have handy), and build your own!

Tie the cord to the screw (or glue it so you don’t lose the screw) on one end of the cord. Form a loop a bit larger than your foot at the other end of the cord or strap. Make the length of the cord just long enough so; when holding the camera up to your eye to shoot, the other end(loop) is in such a position that you can put your foot in the loop and pull the cord upward, tight. This tension will keep your camera steady for shooting. When done, roll it up and put it in your pocket. Cost? Under a couple of bucks even if you have to buy everything.

The mounting nut should be a “Self Locking Nut” so it will stay tight when inserting the thumb screw into the tripod socket.

This tip comes to us from Ronald Stein: Green Valley Camera club of Green Valley, AZ. More images are after the jump.

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Nikon D810 first impressions product images (5 of 8)ISO 4001-60 sec at f - 3.2

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When it comes to seeing through a viewfinder, many folks don’t ever bother to adjust the diopter of their camera. But the truth is that you really should adjust it lest your eyes strain when looking through this very small hole. The problem though is with people not knowing how to properly adjust it for themselves.

For starters, consider your eyesight. If you wear glasses you’ll know whether you’re near sighted or far sighted. Depending on your prescription, you’ll want to adjust the diopter accordingly. Diopters often have a +2 or =3 setting to enable photographers to adjust what they see through the viewfinder for their vision.

Both EVF and OVF work differently though. With an EVF, it’s mostly a matter of looking through the viewfinder, turning on text displays and adjusting the diopter until you can see the text correctly. But when working with an OVF, it can become much trickier as what you’re seeing is optical and not electronic. For optical viewfinders, we recommend taking the lens off, pointing the camera at a light source and looking at the focusing points through the viewfinder. Then adjust the setting accordingly until you see them the clearest. When this is done, you’ll have set the diopter for your eye.

The new ZEISS Distagon T* 1,4/35 ZM for professional reportage photography Das neue ZEISS Distagon T* 1,4/35 ZM für die Profi-Reportagefotografie

There were rumors of a new Zeiss 35mm f1.4 Otus lens floating around the web, and if you’re a forum lurker hoping to bite your lip and close your eyes to the chart readings then you’ll probably be a bit disappointed. The reason for that is because the new Zeiss 35mm f1.4 ZM lens was designed for Leica M mount cameras. It has been unveiled today at Photokina 2014.

As it is though, 35mm f1.4 lenses are very highly sought after in the M mount world with Leica releasing a redesign of theirs a couple of years ago. The new Zeiss 35mm f1.4 ZM lens features a T* anti-reflective lens coasting, 10 blade aperture, 1/3 stop adjustment, and ergonomic finger rest,

We’re very curious about how this will perform on cameras like the Sony A7r or the Fujifilm XT1. But at $2,290 this is a bit more than we can swallow. Tech specs are after the jump.

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer battle of the 85mm lenses portaits (7 of 9)

When it comes to working with off-camera flashes, many experienced strobists will tell you that no camera system’s TTL operation will be able to give you exactly what you want right off the bat. For that, you’ll want to work with manual lighting. But there are tricks to get a flash system to give you the exposure that you want if you understand how TTL lighting works to begin with.

This short guide is designed as an intro for those just stepping into the lighting game.

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Panasonic GM5 first impressions images (4 of 5)ISO 4001-60 sec at f - 5.0

Panasonic has always embraced the philosophy of having small cameras with a very big sensor: and today’s announcement of the GM5 is no different. This camera is targeted at the photographer that wants something incredibly compact–dare we say pocketable. The camera, which is available in either black or red, sports a magnesium body with a 1,165K dot EVF, had a 921K 3 inch touch screen WiFi, 60p video, and allows for editing to be done in the camera.

At its heart is a 16MP Four Thirds size sensor–and that allows the camera to shoot 5fps. When it launches at the start of November, you’ll be able to pick it up at an $899 price point.

Also being announced today is the new Panasonic 14mm f2.5–which has six elements in five groups with 3 aspherical elements. Additionally, it sports seven aperture blades. More info and photos are after the jump.

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