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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Fujifilm XT10 first impressions (2 of 15)ISO 2001-750 sec at f - 1.4

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Cameras by default are set to metering a scene through the evaluative setting, but they have three different settings. Evaluative will analyze an entire scene and figure out a way to create the scene that the camera thinks you want. Center-weighted metering meters a scene based on what’s in the center of whatever the camera is pointing at and sees. Spot metering meters the scene off of a specific spot that you choose. This is best used in combination with manual autofocus point selection.

Most people shoot and never think about their metering mode. Then when they chimp their LCD screen and don’t like the image, they simply just overexpose or underexpose. But to avoid that altogether, the best route to take is to first consider what you want in the end vision of your photo.

In the image above, Erica was being strongly backlit by the sunlight coming down the avenue. In the evaluative mode, the camera would have compensated for this and made her very dark in order to cater to the highlights. But in spot metering mode, the camera metered for her face due to my metering off of it and autofocusing off of it.

If I didn’t switch to spot metering, the camera would have needed to be set to overexpose the scene by around a stop at most. This can save you a bunch of time in post-production but it can also just make your life easier as far as actually getting the image you want the first time around goes.

In general, the best reason to use spot metering would have to be if only a specific thing in the scene is more important to you and the image more than anything else–such as with a portrait. With a landscape, you’re probably best off with evaluative metering unless you spot meter the highlights, then spot meter the shadows, then find a happy medium point. If you figure this out, you can then go ahead and get the exact photo that you want with less attempts.

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Fujifilm 90mm f2 first impressions product images (1 of 9)ISO 4001-60 sec at f - 3.2

While Fujifilm has had the 56mm f1.2 X lens available, they’ve lacked a longer and more flattering portrait lens. But earlier this year, the company announced their 90mm f2, which has a 135mm equivalent field of view. To date, it’s the company’s biggest prime lens and in some ways is almost as large as the DSLR equivalent that we’ve seen on the market. With a large focusing ring, it’s also quite nice to hold while remaining ergonomically balanced with many of the company’s higher end cameras.

The Fujifilm 90mm f2 R LM WR lens has a $949 price point and incorporates weather sealing, seven aperture blades, three extra low dispersion elements, Super EBC lens coatings, and 11 elements in 8 groups. Weighing 1.19lbs, it’s also fairly hefty for a lens designed for a mirrorless camera.

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With Sony’s A7s going into the nuclear high ISO ranges, Canon is announcing a new camera that they’re claiming is capable of delivering what they claim to be an output equivalent of over 4,000,000 ISO. According to the press release, it’s called the ME20F-SH and it’s targeted at very low light applications. “Nighttime surveillance and security, cinematic production, reality television, and nature/wildlife documentaries are just some of the ME20F-SH’s many possible usage applications.” states the release.

It sports a full frame 35mm sensor that captures full color HD video with reduced noise according to what the company claims. Additionally, it doesn’t need infrared illumination to focus in very low light.

The camera has an EF mount–which means it can take all of Canon’s lenses or those from Sigma and other manufacturers. But don’t expect it to be cheap. When it comes out this December, it’ll cost you $30,000.

Canon’s press release and more photos are after the jump.

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Fujifilm Xt10 review final product images (4 of 4)ISO 2001-180 sec at f - 2.0

Fujifilm’s strategy of taking their pro line and stripping down a bit for the consumer has been most recently reflected with the Fujifilm X-T10. Borrowing lots from the X-T1, this srategy is used often in the industry but with Fujifilm being the newest ILC manufactuer on the market, it’s quite amazing that it happened so soon to its flagship DLSR-style mirrorless interchangeable lens camera.

The Fujifilm X-T10 strips out the weather sealing, removes lots of the dials, and gives the camera a more simplistic interface. But that doesn’t mean that since it’s been stripped down that it can’t take incredible photos.

In fact, quite the opposite is the case here.

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Nikon D300

For many years now, photographers have thought that the Nikon D7200 and 7000 line in general hasn’t been a true successor to the Nikon D300s. While Nikon has stated that there will be no D400, an interesting forum thread was started on Fox2. The New Camera reports that it will sport a 24.3MP APS-C sensor at the heart.Additionally, it’s possible that it will have a 51 points AF system, ISO range up to 51200, and will also supports recording 4K UHD.

In some ways, it makes a lot of sense as Nikon has been pushing the megapixel count on their APS-C sensors–and so has the industry in general.

If a new flagship APS-C camera arises, it’s also bound to include tougher weather sealing and will perhaps be hyper targeted the way that the Canon 7D MK II was. That camera was really, really targeted at bird photographers–and those are the pros that really love their APS-C DSLRs and lens collection.

If the Nikon D400 comes in September the way that the reports are saying, then it will be right before Photo Plus 2015.

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All photos by Hien H Nguyen. Used with permission.

Being a foodie and a photographer can sometimes feel like a full time job–but for Hien H Nguyen it’s a wonderful life. He’s an investments professional during the day and has always has a big love of both food and photography. His job lets him travel and he’s become buddies with many chefs out there. But beyond this, he’s also a trained photographer even though his only client is himself.

When he sent us an email showing us his incredible food photos, we were seriously captivated. And you’re bound to be also.

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