web analytics

autofocus

Review: Sony A7s

by Chris Gampat on 07/25/2014

Chris Gampat the Phoblographer Sony A7s product images (1 of 8)ISO 16001-50 sec at f - 4.0

The Sony A7s has to be the single camera that will shift the megapixels race to the ISO stage. When it was first announced, it was billed as a low megapixel high ISO territory trailblazing camera. Then tests started to come out that confirmed this. Indeed, Sony’s 12MP full frame sensor is quite capable not only of delivering very clean high ISO results, but also pretty darned good RAW file versatility. But there is so much more to the camera than this.

The A7s also is one of the fastest focusing cameras that we’ve tested on the site–and for that reason its reliability as a tool in your daily life increases. The camera is a dream come true for many photojournalists, concert photographers, and videographers.

On the other hand, still photographers are bound to be disappointed somewhat by fewer megapixels and the lack of detail at lower ISOs.

But Sony delivered some Editor’s Choice award winning products in the A7 and A7r. Is the A7s worthy of the award too?

Editor’s Note: this review is based solely on a photographer’s point of view. We will post another article later on comparing this camera’s video output to the Panasonic GH4.

[click to continue…]

Adapters gservo-3628-20140629-3

I have used lens adapters on mirrorless cameras–just like loads and loads of other users do. When I made the decision to buy the Sony A7, my previous experience with adapters influenced my purchase. Instead of buying Sony lenses, I would keep on using my Nikon lenses. It had been suggested one would have to be insane to use Nikon lenses with a Sony camera, which doesn’t make sense to me. With this decision I knew there would be some sacrifice. Yes, it would have been easy just to buy another Nikon camera, but I wanted something that was full-frame and mirrorless. Nikon is not creating the cameras that I want, but I love my Nikon glass.

And with that, begins my story of what I lose with adapters.

[click to continue…]

Chris Gampat the Phoblographer Sony Rx100 Mk III and Canon G1x Mk II comparison (6 of 7)ISO 400001-60 sec at f - 1.8

Two of this year’s best point and shoot cameras are the Canon G1X Mk II and the Sony RX100 Mk III. Both cameras share a decorated lineage and both are aimed at the enthusiast that wants a pocket camera with a large sensor.

But just which one is better?

[click to continue…]

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Sony A7s first impressions photos (4 of 22)ISO 2001-60 sec at f - 5.0

While we’re currently in our testing stage with the Sony A7s, we’ve been seeing how it performs at high ISOs and out in the streets. And to be honest, the high ISO results make us believe that this single camera will change the street photography game. With results that are completely usable at levels we never even thought of (and those that aren’t can be worked with in Adobe Lightroom) it basically makes the traditional rules of photography obsolete.

Here’s why.

[click to continue…]

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Sony A7s first impressions photos (9 of 22)ISO 2001-60 sec at f - 3.2

In our tests so far with the Sony A7s, we found that the high ISO results have been awesome and that the camera’s silent shutter feature is super quiet–in fact we can’t even hear it.

But the AF also received some impressive bumps with the Lock On AF setting that lets you focus on a subject then tracks it through the entire frame. It’s perfect for folks that want to focus and recompose. While this technology has been around for a while, it’s really cool that it’s in a full frame mirrorless camera now.

The feature is demonstrated in a short video that we did on our Instagram. It has been embedded into this post and you can see it after the jump.

[click to continue…]

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Samsung 16-50mm lens review (1 of 6)ISO 4001-50 sec at f - 4.0

When Samsung first announced their 16-50mm f2-2.8 lens, we were incredibly excited that they offered something quite different from their previous products. The last very serious lens that they released was their 85mm f1.4, but now the company boasts a whole new level of professional quality–or at least that was the intent.

Samsung’s 16-50mm f2-2.8 incorporates weather sealing into the design, which works perfectly with the company’s NX30 camera. It also is quite a beefy optic to hold while shooting. But beyond this, the lens was designed with 9 aperture blades and 18 elements in 12 groups. And at its pretty hefty cost, we can gladly say that this is one of the best lenses that we’ve tested for street photography.

But as we all know, a lens system works with the cameras that are available to it.

[click to continue…]