web analytics

autofocus

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Sigma 50mm f1.4 Art Lens Review images (1 of 13)ISO 4001-800 sec at f - 3.5

Though they’re two different focal lengths, this question was bound to be asked by someone. Sigma now has two excellent options for full frame users from their Art series of lenses: their 50mm f1.4 DG HSM and their 35mm f1.4 DG HSM. Both have been tried and true to be capable performers. But which one is best for you?

Be sure to also check out our guide to Sigma’s prime lenses.

Editor’s Note: Check out our first sample imagesfull review, and comparison posts against the 35mm f1.4 and 50mm f1.4 version 1.

[click to continue…]

Chris GampatThe Phoblographer Sigma 50mm f1.4 lenses (3 of 3)ISO 2001-60 sec at f - 4.0

Sigma recently updated their 50mm f1.4 lens to include not only the Art branding badge, but also a totally new look to the lens. The new Art offering joins the 35mm f1.4 as another prime for DSLRs under the new Global Vision that the company is touting right now. Many folks own the older Sigma 50mm f1.4, and with the release of the new one you might be wondering if it’s worth an upgrade or not.

In our real world tests, we explore the differences.

Editor’s Note: Check out our first sample imagesfull review, and comparison posts against the 35mm f1.4 and 50mm f1.4 version 1.

[click to continue…]

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Sigma 50mm f1.4 Art Lens Review product lead (1 of 1)ISO 4001-100 sec at f - 3.5

Sigma’s 50mm f1.4 DG HSM Art is the successor to the company’s previous 50mm f1.4 lens that was also held in very high regard. However, the new lens has been brought in line both in terms of design and image quality with the company’s new Global Vision–and specifically under its Art lineup. The focal length and aperture are an iconic one that many photographers swear by. In fact, many only shoot with this one lens.

But is Sigma’s 50mm f1.4 DG HSM Art offering enough to make you want to trade up?

Editor’s Note: Check out our first sample imagesfull review, and comparison posts against the 35mm f1.4 and 50mm f1.4 version 1.

[click to continue…]

20111018_loRes_eos1dx_frontnolensThe Canon EOS 1D X and EOS 1D C are supposed to be Canon’s hardiest full-frame camera bodies, but it seems the cameras are having some difficulties with autofocusing in cold weather situations. An anonymous source explained to Canon Rumors that the camera’s AF system do not work in temperatures below 0°C (32°F). The AF system purportedly “does not autofocus”, “does not search in AF” or “does not focus in AF search” when exposed to extremely low temperatures.

The source explained the issue is caused by a mechanical defect that causes the sub mirror system to become misaligned. This in turn causes the light rays reflected by the sub mirror to miss the AF sensor, rendering it useless. The full technical explanation follows.

This phenomenon is due to the Locking Claw of the Sub Mirror (mirror for AF) going over the Locking Pin. The Sub Mirror’s angle becomes deviated and the light rays for AF does not fall on the AF sensors, causing the ‘does not autofocus’ phenomenon.

While most photographers won’t have to contend with subfreezing temperature, such as -20°C (-4°F), it’s a major issue for anyone shooting landscapes or capturing polar bears in the arctic. Canon has since corrected the issue for cameras manufactured after January 24, 2013. However, if you’re hanging onto an older camera, replacing the mirror box with a newer version labeled CY3-1661-010 or CY3-1687-010 can repair the malfunction.

Via Canon Rumors

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Olympus OMD EM10 product photos (2 of 7)ISO 4001-60 sec at f - 4.0

As the entry level camera in the OMD lineup of the camera, the OMD EM10 is a camera that many looking to get into the mirrorless world will want to reach for. With some of the fastest focusing performance that we’ve seen from a mirrorless camera and a great JPEG engine output, what more could one ask for?

When Olympus created the EM10, they took a bit of their EM5, EM1, and the EP5 and put it in a budget conscious camera. Indeed, we think that most folks should skip what a sales person will tell you about buying a DSLR and just spring for this camera.

With that said though, it still isn’t the best at everything.

Editor’s Note: 4/8/2014 we’ve updated to include RAW file findings.

[click to continue…]

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

We’ve been using Samsung’s 85mm f1.4 for a very long time, and it’s tough to not fall in love with it. Exhibiting some of the best color rendition that we’ve seen, fast focusing, and superb sharpness, we don’t see how many could complain. Seriously, what more could you want from a lens?

Introduced a couple of years ago, Samsung’s offering differs from many others through controls and mainly in the rendition of its colors. And if you pair it with the right camera, it may never fail to take your breath away.

[click to continue…]