Review: Pentax K-1

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The Pentax K-1 is a camera that is great in many ways. It offers features that Canon, Nikon and Sony just don’t in a full frame DSLR while also keeping the price point fairly modest. Pentax’s strategy for years was always to take professional grade features and bring them down to the consumer and enthusiast. For the most part, the Pentax K-1 does that. With cool things like Astrotracer, WiFi, Composition adjustment, and arguably the weirdest LCD screen in the industry, the K-1 is a camera that will suit the needs of most professional photographers when paired with the right lenses.

Sure, Pentax may not have the more extended dedicated flash and lens support that Canon, Nikon and Sony do (especially in TTL monolights)–but that doesn’t mean that it still can’t be a very capable camera in the hands of an experienced photographer.

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Review: Pentax 15-30mm f2.8 ED SDM WR (Pentax F)

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The Pentax K-1 is probably the greatest thing to happen to many Pentax users in a while; and when you consider some fantastic lenses like the company’s Pentax 15-30mm f2.8 you start to see more and more how someone could almost want to switch systems. The Pentax 15-30mm f2.8 is a weather sealed beast of a lens that works very well with the Pentax K-1 and is designed for landscape, architecture, and Real Estate photographers. But it’s also a generally great walkaround lens if you’re the type that enjoys shooting wide. Like all wides, it can also be used to deliver a very unique perspective when shooting portraits.

With 9 aperture blades in its design and HD coatings to render even more details, there’s a lot to love here.

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Extended First Look: The Olympus OM-D E-M1 Mark II

The Olympus EM1 Mk II

When Olympus announced their latest flagship Micro Four-Thirds camera at Photokina, the Olympus OM-D E-M1 Mark II (EM1 Mk. II), we got a chance to do a quick overview of what the newest flagship had to offer. Overall we were pleased with what the specs promised to both the high-level enthusiasts and to the professional photographer as well, but just how well did it deliver in the real world? After spending four days with the camera, here’s what we found.

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First Impressions: Canon M5

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The Canon M5 is the company’s first truly serious attempt at a mirrorless cameras, and they’ve had a number of years to think about just how they were going to approach the market. Targeted at the advanced amateur the Canon M5 is an amazingly small camera with a quite a bit of power inside. With a 24MP Canon developed APS-C sensor at the heart, this camera honestly should have been announced two years ago.

But as a camera itself: it really isn’t quite that bad.

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First Impressions: Canon 16-35mm f2.8 L USM III (Canon EF)

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I never quite understood the Canon 16-35mm f2.8 series of lenses–they overlap with the company’s 24-70 offerings and the Nikon 14-24mm f2.8 lenses seemed to be more reasonable in terms of building a kit. But nonetheless, the lenses have always been popular with the photographers that really need the wide to semi-wide angle of view. When the Canon 16-35mm f2.8 L USM III was announced, I figured that it made sense to replace that lens. Interestingly enough, these focal lengths are some of my favorite to play with. I swear by the 35mm field of view over the 50mm field of view, and I thoroughly enjoy shooting wider than 24mm when I can.

But to be honest, I didn’t know what to expect from the beta version of the Canon 16-35mm f2.8 L USM III lens that I tried.

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Review: Canon 11-24mm f4 L USM (Canon EF)

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If you were to tell me that I would honestly fall in love with a Canon lens like the Canon 11-24mm f4 L USM earlier this year, I would’ve told you that I’ve had my heart broken by the company many times in the past few years since the Canon 5D Mk III came out. But when I had the chance to play with the Canon 11-24mm f4 L USM, I was rather excited by its output. Not because Canon flew me and a bunch of other journalists out to the Hot Air Balloon festival in New Mexico, but because when it was first announced I was honestly intrigued. The lens is billed as being completely and totally rectilinear–and when bringing the images into Adobe Lightroom, Adobe’s algorithms seemed to agree.

As one of the company’s wide angle zoom lens options, this is a lens designed for architecture, real estate, and landscape photographers. Instilled with Canon’s weather sealing present in most L lenses, it’s an optic that you’re bound to enjoy if you love shooting wide.

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Fine Tuning Your Autofocus: Making Your Camera Simply Work Better

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Autofocusing with cameras is one of the biggest features that are always kept in mind when someone makes a purchase. Unfortunately though, not everyone knows how to take the best advantage of what their camera offers them. In truth, if you’ve got a camera from 2011 and afterward, you pretty much have everything you’ll need to accomplish most everyday tasks when it comes to autofocusing on your subject. Whether you’re photographing your pets running around like maniacs or photographing a subject in the dimly lit dark, your camera can handle most instances if you just use it correctly.

Let’s delve delve into this.

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Which One? The Sony RX1r II vs Leica Q Comparison

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If you wanted to go for a premium point and shoot camera of some sort, then the best of the best is easily awarded to the Sony RX1r II and the Leica Q. With their full frame sensors and fast aperture lenses, they’re bound to be appreciated by many photographers. Both of them have been out for a while now, and with the price differences not too far apart from one another you’re obviously curious about which one you should get. For some, the answer is clear: you prefer a higher megapixel sensor and the 35mm field of view. Others however want to go for the 28mm f1.7 lens and don’t want to fill their hard drives up.

We’ve reviewed both cameras, so here’s what we think.

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