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Photography app EyeEm is one of the best ways for a photographer to organically get discovered. You’ll also notice the feed is much different from Instagram. Your feed is filled with handpicked talent and albums so new talent can emerge. If you want to view what your friends are contributing, then you’ll need to specifically go to the “following” tab.

Browsing through the work of the artists on the platform introduces you to some of the similarities with VSCO and Instagram. For example, while lots of folks use their phones to shoot photos, there are many that use dedicated cameras and then upload to the service.

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julius motal introversion the phoblographer

I have a hard time around new people. At parties, I look for the one person I know, and if that’s a wash, I float at the edges of conversations. I’m terrible at introducing myself, though if I’m okay if I’m introduced. The thing about introversion is that I get my energy from within and from my pursuits. Social functions can be exhausting, and I sometimes need to remove myself to the periphery in order to recharge. Photography and by extension writing, like the work I do for this site, quickly became a natural fit for me because it allows me to contextualize my thoughts and put them out into the world in a way that engages with people, which is what draws me to photographing on the street. [click to continue…]

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Zeiss Batis 25mm f2 first impressions (14 of 24)ISO 4001-25 sec at f - 2.0

When photographers first start out in the career path, many of them don’t know a lot about the business side. Indeed, not many now about creating an LLC, billing, licensing, time management, marketing, etc. It’s tough, but the best of the best learn it as they go and adapt to the changing climate as it happens.

We talked to 14 different photographers and asked them what they wish they knew about the industry when they first started. The answers may surprise you.
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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Sony a7 Mk II product photos (4 of 8)ISO 1001-50 sec at f - 5.0

When it comes to protecting a Copyright, lots of photographers and photo enthusiasts don’t know much about it. After all, many of them aren’t lawyers. We all wish and hope that our work won’t get stolen, but unfortunately it happens much more often than we’d like. With millions of photos being taken each day, there is also no telling how many thefts are reported or if the artist is even aware that it’s happening.

But in anticipation of the moment that it happens, we’ve talked to a couple of experts on the matter.

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Samsung NX500 First impressions product photos (12 of 12)ISO 2001-6400 sec at f - 2.0

Yes, we know–one should always shoot RAW. But there are lots of folks out there who are lazy (be honest) and there are situations where you don’t need to necessarily shoot in RAW. Even if it’s not you, maybe a friend of yours will want something with more power and won’t want to go through the issues with post-production. Unfortunately, not everyone is so judicious about their photography and getting everything perfect.

But then again, there are those who are very much for just getting it right in the camera and not worrying about post-production.

No matter what your needs are, these five cameras shoot incredible JPEGs.

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I know the title may sound a little sensational, but I’d love to get to the bottom of this. Please consider this article more as a discussion and food for thought than a definite answer to the initial question.

While pursuing my Master’s degree in Psychology at University of Twente in the Netherlands, one of the most heated discussions was always regarding the nature versus nurture debate. In case you haven’t heard of it, it revolves around how much of your innate qualities are genetic and how much are based on your experiences. Are you smart because you have the genetic material to be smart or did you simply become smart by what you’ve done and how you were brought up? To this day there’s no definite answer to these questions and many researchers propose that the debate should be retired.

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