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Chris Gampat the Phoblographer Sigma vs Rokinon 35mm f1.4 comparison lead image (1 of 1)ISO 4001-50 sec at f - 2.8

Rokinon recently announced their AF chipped version of their 35mm f1.4 lens for Canon EF mount cameras. For this segment of the market, it’s about time. The new lens doesn’t sport an aperture ring and instead works perfectly with Canon’s DSLRs in a way very much like Zeiss does.

With the new chipped version of the lens, we decided to see how it holds up against the Sigma 35mm f1.4–the current king of the 35mm lenses in our book.

Editor’s Note: we’re not sanctioning this test to be the end all be all of all tests. It’s informal as per the way that the site’s philosophy works with our in the field real world reviews do.

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Chris Gampat the Phoblographer Sony A7s product images (5 of 8)ISO 4001-100 sec at f - 5.6

With so many options out there and camera manufacturers introducing new models all the time, it can be tough for someone to figure out what mirrorless camera they should get. It all begins not by saying to your sales guy, “What’s the best camera?” The truth is that they’re all damned good. In fact, the technology has come so far that it’s almost impossible for you to take a terrible image by conventional standards.

Instead, what you should be asking is what you need. That can open up a floodgate of even more questions. But just like buying a car, computer or even a fridge, you should take a look at what your options are.

Here’s how to pick the best mirrorless camera for you.

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Nikon D810 review lead product image (1 of 1)ISO 4001-60 sec at f - 4.0

At least every other day, we receive an email or message of some sort asking about what camera someone should purchase. In fact, I’ve been dealing with emails like this for years via the Phoblographer and during my time at B&H Photo. Usually, it’s from someone who knows nothing about photography. A former colleague of mine recently messaged me and said something along the lines of “Hey, the wife and I are thinking about buying a DSLR. I heard the D800 is good. What should I get?”

Granted, he and his wife know nothing about photography and when I tried to tell him that they don’t need a DSLR or anything as high level as a D800, he thought that I was completely insane. Then I offered alternatives from Fujifilm and Sony in the high end point and shoot world. He retorted with “Okay, just tell me this then: Canon or Nikon?”

Again, I told him that a DSLR is over his head, unless he really wants to learn how to use one to its potential. In truth, it’s also serious overkill.

“Why do you want a DSLR?” I said.

“Better pictures.” He said.

“Yes, but you’ll only get better pictures if you really want to dedicate yourself to learning how to use one. And with a kid on the way you won’t have the time.” I returned.

The point though is that not everyone needs a DSLR or a mirrorless camera. To be incredibly honest, most of the work that I do for the site or the paid photography gigs that I do doesn’t require super high end cameras. But to be fair, I have great lighting knowledge.

Still though, I seriously think that everyone needs to stop just reaching for DSLRs and mirrorless cameras and instead take a strong look at what the high end point and shoot market is offering. There are loads and loads of great options.

And of course, no one is making a bad camera.

 

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Sony NEX 50mm lens review (4 of 10)

Congratulations! You’ve got your first paid photo gig. This also means that you’re on your way to the dream of shooting full time and getting lots more work. But you’ll need to play your cards rights. Now what? You’re lost, right? You’re nervous, right? Well, you should be.

Just kidding. This will be a breeze if you keep in mind these simple reminders.

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer The Beginning Street Photogrpaher (1 of 7)ISO 1001-250 sec at f - 5.6

We’re going to let you in on a fact of life: no matter what you’re doing, you need to get the shot. No one will sit there and give you the benefit of the doubt that maybe you were nervous; they want you to work to get what you needed to accomplish. And in street photography, you always saying that you’re too shy to capture a moment or get close to a subject will mean that in the end you’re probably not going to produce an image that works. Of course, there are exceptions, but it’s also a generally accepted notion that shooting wide is one of the best options that you can do when shooting the streets.

And even if you’re just getting into the medium, it’s always best to start wide.

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"www.thomascampbellphoto.com"

Recently I spent almost two weeks on a trip to Iceland with a primary purpose of shooting landscapes of the amazing country. It is always hard to guess exactly what I would need, especially considering I am more of a portrait photographer than a landscape photographer and am not especially experienced at landscapes, though like nearly all photographers, I love shooting landscapes.

I want to go through what I decided to pack for my trip to Iceland, why I decided to pack it, and what I would do differently if I knew what I knew now after two weeks in Iceland.

Editor’s Note: This is a guest blog post from former Phoblographer staffer Thomas Campbell

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