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Phoblographer (5)

All images by Jacob Loafman. Used with permission.

The first year is always the toughest both as a business owner and as a photographer. It’s all about understanding yourself as a shooter, making sure that your business is profitable, and adjusting to the landscape. We found photographer Jacob Loafman and upon hearing that he has been shooting for just under a year, we were quite shocked to see the incredible quality of his work and his success–which is seemingly rare amongst many budding professionals.

Jacob attributes his success partially to his tagline: “Let’s create together.” He admits that the business side was incredibly tough, and that his beginnings were still very humble.

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Lomography Petzval Lens review images samples (10 of 24)ISO 4001-320 sec

The term bokeh colloquially refers to the quality of the out of focus area in an image. But over the years, it has come to be more associated with the whole out of focus area to begin with. In fact, it’s something that many photographers, enthusiasts and others become obsessed with. To get it, you need lenses with wide apertures and generally longer focal length lenses–though some wider options can do a great job too.

In our tests over the years, we’ve run across lenses from different manufacturers that exhibit some incredible bokeh. Here are some of our favorite lenses with the best bokeh.

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All images by Giles Clement. Used with permission.

Being a photographer is tough to make profitable, but we can only imagine how much tougher the analog world has it. Photographer Giles Clement is one of the modern photographers that chooses to use the tintype look and format over film, digital, and other forms of the art. But Giles hasn’t let the complications that come with the format hold him back. Indeed, Mr. Clement has mastered his craft and as figured out ways to make it profitable for him.

In fact, Giles seems to have it all down to a simple science.

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Chris Gampat Shooting Landscapes (1 of 10)

Making your landscape images stand out from the pack isn’t exactly simple to do. In fact, landscape photography can either be the simplest or one of the most complicated forms of photography depending on how you approach it. It involves careful composition, lots of painstaking time, exploration, and commitment to getting the right image.

More than anything else though, landscape photography requires discipline. As a photo editor who views hundreds of images a day and goes through loads and loads of portfolio submissions, I can tell you what happens is that you often end up seeing more and more of the same thing.

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FAROE-11

All images by Daniel Zvereff. Used with permission.

Photographer Daniel Zvereff was featured last year on the Phoblographer for his Introspective project. During that time Mr. Zvereff was on a tour of self-discovery that we’re sure many photographers and artists take. Interestingly, the project used Kodak Aerochrome to turn greens in his images into purples. Since then, Daniel has completed a number of other personal projects: with one of our favorites being his journey to the island of Faroe. Faroe is an island where there are quite literally more sheep than people.

Beginning a documentary project like this takes planning and lots of thought. So we chatted with Dan about what it’s like to be a documentary photographer and the Faroe project.

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Essentials for th Strobist Street Photographer (2 of 9)ISO 1001-200 sec at f - 3.5

“I want to be a pro.”

Don’t pretend like that thought hasn’t come across your mind at all. Many of us as photographers have always wanted to go pro. It’s in gear marketing, it’s part of the aspirations of many in the photo community, and it’s ingrained in so many tutorials that are all across the web. So what does being a pro mean? Being a professional photographer means that the large majority of your income is from photography. This means that you shoot for a living and if you’re not shooting then you probably can’t pay rent, put food on the table, etc. Is this you? Probably not.

But then let’s start to break that down a bit more: you could aspire to be a semi-professional photographer. This means that anywhere from around 40-50% of your income is from photography. The rest of the money may come from your full time job. Being the semi-professional photographer is a much more attainable ideal to strive for than relying entirely on photography for all of your income. No matter how good you are, you need to consider a couple of very big factors at play here.

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