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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Fujifilm X30 first image samples (1 of 28)ISO 4001-80 sec at f - 2.8

The title of this piece can almost make you say, “Duh” depending on what school of thought you’re coming from. Whether we choose to believe it or not, the iPhone is one of the most popular street photography cameras not only due to its small size and reliability, but for the fact that it has such a small sensor that it’s tough to not get a subject in focus. The sensor is indeed so small that it is tough to get something not in focus–so the photographer is forced to have compelling subject matter without relying on tricks like bokeh.

And by going on a similar train of thought, one can argue that smaller sensors indeed make street photography easier.

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I have a confession to make: ever since getting involved in the whole strobist world, I’ve been on the hunt for the perfect light modifier. It has lead me down paths to experiment with beauty dishes, softboxes, ring flashes, umbrellas and octabanks. While every light modifier is very capable of doing their own thing very well, I’ve found that umbrellas are the most versatile. And because of this fact, I own four of them.

Umbrellas are great! They give beautiful catchlights in the eyes, can bring out lots of detail in a subject, have a beautiful and inefficient light spread that isn’t really directional but can be made so, and they’re super portable.

And more so than any other light modifier, I believe umbrellas rule them all.

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Pro Tip: Sometimes a very wide angle lens can help with photojournalistic work. Use caution though and don't get too close up to a subject.

Pro Tip: Sometimes a very wide angle lens can help with photojournalistic work. Use caution though and don’t get too close up to a subject.

Novice photographers worry all the time about whether or not their images will get stolen. Whenever I talk to people about building a photo website, one of the most commonly asked questions after mobile design is how to protect your images from being stolen. The truth is: you can’t. In the age of screenshotting and going into a page’s source code to get the images, getting someone’s images from their website is incredibly simple if you have moderate HTML knowledge.

The absolute best way is to keep them offline. But if you want exposure, then you have to take the risk. In the chance that your images are stolen, hopefully you’ve taken the right step to tracking them. The best practices are to name your images with your name, duplicate that into the meta keywords, add that into the artist and copyright sections, and to do a bunch of other methods that we list here.

But above all of this, we want to tell beginners to do one thing: don’t worry. The absolute total truth is going to hurt, but you need to hear it.

Ready? Okay.

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The Bite Trio.

The Bite Trio.

Concerts are a crapshoot. It’s never easy to tell if it’ll be a packed house or how terrible the lighting will be. There are some things you can prepare for and some things you can’t. Here’s a list of tips to help you with your next gig. [click to continue…]

julius motal the phoblographer project street 11

It’s the weekend, everyone. Get up and get out on the street. Here are some things to try this weekend when you’re out and about. [click to continue…]

Felix Esser The Phoblographer Lenses Apertures

Consumers who are always concerned about when their camera will become outdated should not only be aware of the technology that has been progressing in sensor performance, but also whether or not lens R&D will be able to keep up. A question dawned on us one day: with sensor technology moving ahead at such a fast pace, will lens technology be able to do the same? Years ago, it was common for a lens to last a photographer 10 years until the next refresh. But in more recent years, we’ve been seeing shorter lifespans of around five years. Part of this is due to developments in autofocusing and sensor technology.

But at the same time, should photographers be afraid that their collection of glass will become obsolete? We talked to the folks at Olympus, Fujifilm, Panasonic, Sigma and Tokina about this.

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