Once a Full Frame Shooter, Always a Full Frame Shooter: Why I Switched from Fujifilm to Sony

I had such a problem, and I realized that full frame is for me.

I know what you’re thinking and no, this is not another article by a pro photographer stating why switching systems has changed his life, upped his game, made life easier and even made him fall in love with photography again. Yes, I am a pro photographer; yes I switched systems but I’m just an ordinary fella with a very particular way of doing photography, with no sponsorship from companies and a limited budget, just like most of us out there.

Recently, I let go my love/hate relationship with the Fujifilm X100T and switched to a different system. Let me tell you a bit of a backstory on why I did the switch and how it happened.

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2015 Recap: 1 Year With the Fujifilm X-Series

This blog post was originally published by Keenan Hastings. It and the images here are being syndicated with permission.

This is not a review of the Fujifilm X-Series cameras, this is simply my recap of 2015, my story in which I heavily used the X Series system.

I can’t believe 2015 is over… Actually, I can’t believe I made it through the entire year. Last September I was let go from my job for improper content on social media (as most of you know). It was one of those bittersweet moments, where I felt shitty because I was fired, but also excited about the opportunities that were now in front of me. I admit early on I was scared, I went from a full-time job where I made a decent amount of money to literally having no income whatsoever. If that wasn’t pressure enough I was expecting a kid as well. I needed an outlet, a vacation or a road trip, something to take my mind off of everything.

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The Best Mirrorless Cameras for Photojournalists

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Sony a7 Mk II product photos (1 of 8)ISO 1001-50 sec at f - 5.0

While Canon and Nikon keep on trucking with their powerhouse cameras, Sony, Fujifilm, Panasonic, Samsung and Olympus have viable and noticeably smaller alternatives. In photojournalism, particularly in breaking news situations, you have to be able to react to split-second changes, and the size and amount of gear you have can help or hinder you. As mirrorless cameras have become more robust, there’s been a gradual shift away from bigger rigs in photojournalism. If a smaller camera can do the job just as well, if not better than a bigger one, why not go for the smaller one? There’s less strain on your neck! With that in mind, here are our recommendations for the best mirrorless cameras for photojournalists.

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Xpert Advice: Overpowering the Sun Using a Leaf Shutter

Xpert Advice Overpowering the Sun with a Leaf Shutter (1 of 1)ISO 8001-15 sec at f - 4.0

One way to naturally add extra punch to an image is to increase the contrast. When you do this, you make the viewer concentrate more on specific areas of the scene–and what better way to do this than to overpower the sun or natural light around you. So how do you do that with your Fujifilm camera? You’ll need to remember some basic parameters first.

To overpower the sun, you’ll need a flash of some sort like a Fujifilm EF-42 (or maybe two of them.) Then keep in mind your exposure parameters:

Shutter speeds: control the ambient lighting, in this case that’s the sun and the natural light around you.

Aperture: Controls depth of field and how much of the flash’s output affects your scene.

ISO: Controls the overall sensitivity of the scene.

When this flash is mounted to a camera like the Fujifilm X100T or the X30, it becomes so much simpler to overpower the sun because of the leaf shutter inside. This means that the shutter unit is in the lens as opposed to the camera body and allows you to shoot at faster shutter speeds with a flash firing than a DSLR or other mirrorless cameras can normally.

By using this setup, you can easily make the natural light appear darker by underexposing it while evenly illuminating your subject by adding output from a flash. This is even simpler to do because the two different types of lighting are linked to different camera settings.

Use this for portraits during the Golden Hour, at weddings, when trying to make a product that you’re about to sell on eBay more appealing, and for many more types of photos like macro shooting. Here’s more on overpowering the sun and more results.

Xpert Advice is a monthly collaboration between the Phoblographer and Fujifilm designed to teach you photography tips and tricks in a bite-sized package.

Fujifilm Announces the X100T and a Silver-Graphite X-T1

julius motal the phoblographer x100t_b_front_3p

The X100T

The rumors are true. Today, Fujifilm is introducing the X100T, its new flagship compact camera. But we’re also getting a silver-graphite edition of the X-T1. The X100T supersedes the X100S as the top-of-the-line compact camera with a host of new features at the same price point of $1299.95 in mid-November 2014.

At its heart though, the X100T is mostly the same camera as the X100s with the exception of a new film mode and built in WiFi being the two new standout features. The camera retains the same 16.3MP APS-C sensor that the X100s has along with the same 23mm f2 pancake lens. Photographers will also be happy to know that there is an interval timer on the camera. Otherwise, know that the camera otherwise sports seven Fn buttons, additional stops on the exposure compensation dial, and the ability to adjust the aperture in 1/3 stops.

The flagship X-T1 interchangeable lens camera comes with a new silver-graphite body, an updated EVF and a higher shutter speed of 1/32000 sec at $1,499.95 in late November 2014. There’s also a black weather-sealed 18-135mm f3.5-5.6 lens that will come bundled with the X-T1 for $1,899.95.

Specs and product images after the jump. Continue reading…

Leaked Photos Show That a Fujifilm X100T May Be On the Way

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It looks like the Fujifilm X100s is about to get an update of some sort very soon. Mirrorless Rumors got a hold of evidence allegedly leaked by photographer David Hobby. the EXIF data of some of the images (which were now taken down)  state that they’re from a new camera called the X100T. This sort of makes sense, as it’s the next letter in the alphabet. However, the S in the nomenclature stood for speed–and we’re not sure what T could stand for.

Fuji Rumors is stating that the camera will boast a 24MP APS-C sensor with faster AF, a new fixed lens, a tilting screen, a new EVF, and a wider phase detection area. These are all upgrades that the X100s needed since the lens attached to the camera was more or less the same as the X100–and the larger megapixels need to work with a newer lens for more resolution.

It’s about time for an X100s update anyway since there have been no major firmware updates to the camera in a while. We’re just going to have to wait and see what comes this way.