Fleeting Moment; An Argument Against the Camera Phone

FOMO: Fear of missing out. Yes, it’s a thing. And there are studies that say that in the future, we’re all just going to try to record everything and be so busy trying to record it all vs actually experiencing it. Part of this comes from use of a camera phone. Camera phones have enabled this whole instinct to capture the moment, pulling it out and documenting everything around you. In contrast, people generally don’t do this with dedicated cameras because there is a much different experience involved with it. It’s much more careful with significantly more thought put into the intent of taking photos vs shooting something with a phone and hoping that you don’t fill up the storage.

The problem: We miss moments.

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The Canon T3i Becomes Flickr’s Most Popular Dedicated Camera

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer T3i T3 dslr (1 of 4)

For many years, the Canon 5D Mk II was an incredibly popular camera on Flickr. In fact, it was probably the most popular dedicated camera. However, Flickr’s newest stats on their Camera Finder page now show the Canon T3i to be the most popular dedicated camera. One of the reasons for this the rise of amateur and hobbyist photographers looking for affordable cameras for them to learn on. And with that said, the T3i is a great option. In fact, a quick Google search for the most popular DSLRs reveals the T3i to be the most popular camera amongst Digital Photography School’s audience. Further research show’s the Canon T3i to be Amazon’s most popular DSLR.

Of course though, it isn’t Flickr’s most popular camera.

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RAW Photo Capabilities Come to Cellphones Via OmniVision

Just when cameras like the S90 and others were making a strive forward, OmniVision has announced today at Mobile World Congress the introduction of a 1/4 inch 5MP sensor that will shoot RAW photos and will be available for cell phones. The sensor is also complete with backside illumination. If that wasn’t enough, it can also shoot 1080p HD video at 30p and 720p at 60p. Let’s also keep in mind that this is a much smaller sensor.

Showing ultimate megapixel restraint, it will allow photographers and users that always have a phone in their pocket to take better pictures and have more flexibility in the editing process. Next to the new sensor in the photo above is a Micro Four Thirds sensor.

While technology like this is great news, let’s keep in mind that most of America also doesn’t know that much about photography so something like this may hopefully encourage them to do more with their photos. It will also boost citizen journalism. Hopefully photo editing apps will be able to keep up, like those on Android. Let’s also keep in mind that processors need to keep up as well. More is available on the press release and technical specs are after the jump.

Via Wired

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