Alessio Trerotoli Delivers Needed, Refreshing Take on Street Photography

All images by Alessio Trerotoli. Used with permission. 

“This series is a sort of art therapy to me,” says Italian Street Photographer, Alessio Trerotoli. He adds, “…I’m a guy full of joy, irony, and love, but I know I have a dark side somewhere, and I need to accept it and to live with it.” He’s talking about Raindrop Blues, his series that mixes street photography and fine art to create a set of compelling and emotional images. It’s a refreshing twist on a genre that has risked becoming stale over the years. And when The Phoblographer first saw the work, we were excited at the thought of sharing it with our readers.

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Urban Melodies: a Multiple Exposure Cityscape Photo Project

Traffic Jam (New York)

All images by Alessio Trerotoli. Used with permission.

“After my graduation in Disciplines of Arts and Cinema I began to travel by myself. In Europe, then in United States and in South America,” photographer Alessio Trerotoli told us in an email introducing his project Urban Melodies. “In that moment I didn’t know how to be a photographer, actually I didn’t know who I was. But my camera was with me, and walking through the streets and the alleys of Paris I suddenly found huge inspiration, an inspiration that followed me in every city I visited since that moment.”

Urban Melodies is an interesting project in that it takes exposure after exposure being layered over and over. Photographers have used the double exposure technique for a while, but Alessio takes it even further by putting more layers on top of one another. “With this project I’m trying to create, by superimposing different pictures, a sort of abstract representation of urban landscapes and contemporary life from modern metropolis like Rome, New York, Paris, Berlin and many others.” says Alessio. “I tried to put my style and my sensibility in this project, that I see like melodic images: similar to the musical notes in a melody, each picture can stand by itself, but layered with the other pictures, the new image expresses a richer meaning. All of them, if linked to one another and concatenated in a bigger context, can create something different and, most importantly, something unique.”

He went on to say that he used four or five different pictures of the same place, the same subject, to create every image. So everything is duplicated, lights and subjects multiply and build a new vision of urban life.

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