The Kodak Disc 4000 Made Small Cameras Cool Way Before Micro Four Thirds

Here’s a blast from the past, remember the Kodak Disc 4000 camera? It might look like a digital camera with such a thin and small but this is indeed a film camera. Rather than taking rolls of film this Kodak camera used film discs with 15 8x10mm negatives arranged around a circle.

Kodak first introduced its Disc 4000 camera in 1982 in response to the popularity of other cartridge formats like 110 film. Along with the compact body, the Kodak disc camera featured an aspherical 12.5mm f2.8 lens and initially came to market with a $66 price tag.

Unfortunately, the film disc’s 8x10mm negatives proved to be too small to resolve a sharp image. Just two years later Kodak ended the production of Disc 4000 camera in 1989. Interestingly enough, disc film’s lifespan stretched well beyond the existence of all disc film cameras and Kodak continued producing the format until 1998. Click past the break to see an old school Kodak ad for the Disc 4000 camera in its full sepia glory.

Via YouTube

Kevin Lee

Kevin Lee is a freelance journalist and photographer based in Brooklyn.