Fotodiox Announces its Budget Line of Excell +1 Speedboosters

Fotodiox Excell +1 Canon FD to MFT Product Image 2

Until now Metabones has been pretty much the only major name spoken of in the Speedbooster world but now Fotodiox is out with its own budget priced competitor named the Excell +1. Fotodiox’s new lens adapters will let shooter mount Nikon G or Canon FD glass onto a Micro Four Thirds camera.

Just like a Speedbooster, the Excell +1 is fitted with a corrective optical glass element that shortens the focal length while offering users a full stop of more light. The Excell +1 adapters also feature aperture rings letting users change the f-stop manually.

When mounting a 50mm lens onto a Micro Four Thirds camera, instead of being a 100mm lens the Excell +1 would effectively turn the lens into a 70mm instead of a 100mm field of view. Alternatively users could also mount the adapter and lens to Blackmagic’s Pocket Cinema Camera to get a lens with a full frame equivalent of 103mm rather than the usual 144mm. Fotodiox plans to release more Excell +1 adapters for more camera bodies in the future including the Sony E-mount, Samsung NX, Fujifilm X, and Pentax K mount systems.

The camera accessory maker is launching its Excell +1 at a special $139.99 introductory rate, a slight discount from the full $159.99 retail price. But compared to the equivalent $400 adapter from Metabones, Fotodiox’s units seem like a complete bargain. Those that order before July 22nd will also get a free Light Cannon Creative Adapter, which also lets users mount lenses to their Micro Four Thirds camera except with the added effect of a soft focus lens, thrown into the deal too.

We’ll have to get in an Excell +1 for testing before we can definitely say it has the same quality as Metabones adapters. Until then though check past the break for more images and a video.

Fotodiox Excell +1 Canon FD to MFT Product Image 1 Fotodiox Excell +1 Nikon G to MFT Product Image 1 Fotodiox Excell +1 Nikon G to MFT Product Image 2

Kevin Lee

Kevin Lee is a freelance journalist and photographer based in Brooklyn.