Photographer Captures Everyday Subway Scenes in Slow-Motion Videos

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Thoughtful, bored, tired, animated, busy, engrossed… These are only a few of the many faces we often miss in our everyday commute in the subway. Whether we’re waiting for the next train in New York’s Grand Central Station, in Berlin’s Alexanderplatz station, or in our own city’s, we rarely pay attention to everybody else around us as we go about our daily lives, our minds distracted with thoughts important to us. We often miss and dismiss those people, on the platform or aboard a passing train, even though for a few minutes, we’re sharing the same purpose–to safely reach our individual destinations.

To photographer Adam Magyar, however, these overlooked everyday scenes that play host to a diverse collection of faces and facial expressions in the subway, are fascinating subjects that he had to capture on camera. So armed with a customized Optronis high-speed camera, which he shot at 56 times the normal speed, he joined the throngs of commuters in the Grand Central Station, the Alexanderplatz, and Tokyo’s Shinjuku station. There he captured the scenes he encountered, along with the countless different windows into people’s thoughts and emotions, in a series of fascinating and, in a way, poetic slow motion videos, of which he has this to say:

An endless row of living sculptures brought together by the same subway line, the same direction, the same intention of taking the train to get caught and carried away by the urban flow. All their motions slowed down, they are graceful and stainless, holding their breath waiting for their train to pull into the station.

See his mesmerizing videos after the jump.

Via PetaPixel




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