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Cameras

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Whether you’re thinking about getting into film, or you’ve magically picked up an old SLR and are confused about how to use it, hopefully this little guide can steer you in the right direction.

The actual process of shooting film isn’t that much different from digital. Assuming you understand how exposure works, then the principle is exactly the same.

If you come from shooting RAW on a digital camera then really you only lose three features.

- Ability to change ISO

- Ability to change White Balance.

- *shocker* Ability to preview your shot

Editor’s Note: This post was originally published at Peter Stewart’s blog. It has been syndicated with permission.

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Product photos Canon 5D Mk III (4 of 10)ISO 200

Reader Ronald Stein sent us a really awesome tip the other day. Despite the fact that summer is about to end for many of us, lots of us are still going to try to get out and soak up as much sun as we can. Then, you’ll also need to consider the fact that you’ll need sunscreen. But before you go to pick up your camera and shoot, make sure that you wash your hands.

Why? Well believe it or not, sunblock deteriorates the exterior of your camera. According to Ron:

“It is a known fact that if one uses a sunblock, most any brand, that the residue left on ones hands, attacks the “Polycarbonate” that some camera manufacturers use in their manufacturing of the camera body handles. There is a substance in the sunblock that will melt and deform the handles on some camera bodies. So, be sure to wash your hands after applying any sunblock on any camera outing. It would also be wise not to even carry a supply in your camera bag due it leaking or a cap coming loose. Be safe – not sorry!!!!”

We checked the information with some of our friends at B&H Photo Video Pro Audio who lead us to this piece on the stress cracking of polycarbonate due to sunscreen. Apparently, it can have the most effect on curved edges of a camera.

To be fair though, I’ve taken our cameras to the beach often during testing right after applying sunscreen to myself. After that, I usually wipe my hands down on my towel and go around to shoot. None of my cameras have ever become deformed.

Either way, we’d still recommend that you stay on the side of caution.

Image Courtesy of Leo Catricala and Hyunsung Cho/Hartford University

Image Courtesy of Leo Catricala and Hyunsung Cho/University of Hartford

Today nearly every person in the world has a camera whether it be a cellphone camera, point-and-shoot, mirrorless camera, DSLRs, Go Pros, aerial drones—you get the idea. While photography is well and alive now, that wasn’t always the case. The Smithsonian Magazine has put together an excellent article looking back over a century detailing the photography first went mainstream.

The thing about early cameras is they used chemically treated plates and paper that took ages to capture an exposure and required subjects to stay still for a half-minute or more. It’s the reason why early portraitures looked so stoic and serious. But enter 1888 and George Eastman introduced the first compact, film-based Kodak camera. The new camera was not only much smaller measuring 2.5-inches in diameter, it was also affordable at $25 and held a roll of film for 100 exposures.

The much more accessible camera allowed many more people to carry cameras outdoors and the public was entranced by the ability to capture the world. Even if they were the most mundane of everyday events, new Kodak photographers would take pictures of bicycles, pets, or themselves. Taking snapshots became a fad and with the introduction of the $1 Brownie camera in 1900 a third of American households owned a camera of some sort by 1905.

While it might seem like photography was universally liked, professional photographers were actually against seeing their art becoming popularized by amateurs. Supposedly paid photographers did not appreciate these “Kodak fiends” who became completely engrossed with taking weird and often out of focus shots.

Now photography has become much more mundane and commonplace, but the controversy has spun out to taking advantage of people’s privacy. With the advent of wearable cameras like Google Glass and aerial drones, photographers now face a new wave of criticism accusing them of sneaky forms of voyeurism to creep shots from above.

Via Smithsonian Magazine

 

"www.thomascampbellphoto.com"

Recently I spent almost two weeks on a trip to Iceland with a primary purpose of shooting landscapes of the amazing country. It is always hard to guess exactly what I would need, especially considering I am more of a portrait photographer than a landscape photographer and am not especially experienced at landscapes, though like nearly all photographers, I love shooting landscapes.

I want to go through what I decided to pack for my trip to Iceland, why I decided to pack it, and what I would do differently if I knew what I knew now after two weeks in Iceland.

Editor’s Note: This is a guest blog post from former Phoblographer staffer Thomas Campbell

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Essentials the Location Shooter (10 of 10)ISO 2001-80 sec

I have a confession to make: I wanted all the gear years ago. My entry point was the Canon 5D Mk II many, many moons ago. I wanted loads of L glass and I wanted to qualify for Canon Professional Services. Back then, you needed two pro level cameras, at least three of the lenses on their recommended list, and had to prove that you’re a working professional. It was going to be awesome. So I went on a quest. I started with a Canon 50mm f1.8–the nifty 50 that everyone gets first. After this I scored the 24-105mm f4 L. Next was the old 80-200mm f2.8 L. Then moved onto a 50mm f1.4. Then the 7D. Then a 35mm f1.4 L. Then an 85mm f1.8. Then flashes came into play. And triggers. And light modifiers. Before I knew it, my camera bag was getting really full and I needed another one.

But then other companies started to develop some amazing technology and I wanted a smaller camera. The Olympus EP2 became my next purchase after getting and using a bunch of Canon L glass and primes. It was small, could take great photos in the right situations, and felt great in the hands. But then the EP3 came out–and it was perhaps the fastest focusing camera in the world. And a spiral happened.

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We’ve seen some cool shirts before that show off that you’re a photo snapper, but none of them are simplistic yet beautiful as these new tees. After some back and forth work, Jeff from Faded and Blurred decided to get more into the apparel game and finally came up with these shirts that feature some classic medium format, SLR, and rangefinder cameras against a solid color. Seems simple enough, right? Well beyond this, Jeff is also trying to ensure that the clothing is ethical and that the buyer can trace materials back to where the cotton was grown.

The shirts more or less are $24 a tee; which isn’t so terrible given that it’s got that swanky design and that it’s ethically sourced. Though if you don’t care about the three year old that was forced to help their mom put a shirt together, then you may think that this ia a tad too rich for your blood.