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Cameras

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Canon G1x product images (1 of 7)ISO 4001-50 sec at f - 4.0

For the person that wants to get serious about photography, know that you don’t need a DSLR or a mirrorless camera or even one with interchangeable lenses. You won’t necessarily get better image quality and for what it’s worth there are other cameras with DSLR sensors in them that give you a more compact size and great performance. That and you won’t need to figure out the big problems like why you shouldn’t put a lens in one pocket and a camera body in the other pocket with no caps (we can hear the experienced shooters shrieking) or like the intricacies of your diopter.

Indeed, there are fixed lens cameras that can do an incredible job that can take professional quality images and that you can probably even do pro-style work with.

Here’s our list of the best cameras that will help you get serious about photography.

PS: Yes, you want pro-quality. But absolutely nothing will make you shoot like a pro except having creative ideas, vision and knowledge in addition to some very good marketing skills. True pros can shoot with anything you hand them.

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Chris-Gampat-The-Phoblographer-Zeiss-15mm-f2

This edition of Cheap Photo features lots of discounts on Amazon’s top sellers in Cameras, an Adorama $250 gift card with a Panasonic GX7 purchase, a great price on an Elinchrom lighting kit, Panasonic G7 kit savings, Fujifilm’s new products, and Zeiss rebates.

Still worthy of note:

The new Canon 50mm f1.8 III is available for pre-order right now, but if you’re a Nikon user then know that bundle deals were also extended and end on the 30th of this month.

Here’s a Memorial Day Special over at Borrow Lenses.

Also check out these refurbished Nikon , Fujifilm accessories, Tamron Rebates, Tokina rebatesSigma rebates, and this Canon 5D Mk II deal with up to $625 in savings at $3,289. Adorama is offering up to $680 off of the Nikon D7100 Camera and bundles with an instant rebate (lots of those available too). Also included is a Free Wifi Adapter ($40 Value).

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It was only a matter of time until Fujifilm tried to play off of the success that the X-T1 gave them. At least that’s what’s to be believed if Mirrorless Rumors is indeed correct. From what it looks like, the camera is in a similar SLR style camera body but stripped down for the more entry level crowd. For starters, Fujifilm has removed the ISO dial on top and replaced it with a mode dial. But otherwise, lots of the X-T1’s features seem to be present. Also note that it is stated to come kitted with an XC lens–which Fujifilm states aren’t as high end as their other X series lenses. The full run down of specs is after the jump.

So does this have any validity? It makes a lot of sense with Fujifilm consistently feeling out their market. We’re bound to see an upgrade to the X Pro 1, X100T, and XE-2 this year. But then consider their other cameras like the XA-1 and the X30–does this seem familiar to you?

Years ago, Sony released a whole load of cameras to feel out the market and effectively build their fleet. With years in, they’re pretty much got it settled  but may experiment more. Fujifilm’s strategy is more akin to what Olympus does though–loads of cameras with the same sensor and where the big differences are essentially just the feature set and camera body design. In terms of a profit standpoint, it seems to work; and Fujifilm may release the Fujifilm X-T10 and maybe even a 100 series underneath it that is even more stripped down.

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Langly Alpha Pro Camera Bag review photos (2 of 9)ISO 4001-1700 sec at f - 1.4

“Hold up guys, I need to change my lenses.”

Rewind to 2007 when I was still in college and my photojournalism teacher and mentor taught me to never be this guy. Fast forward to 2008 during my first internship at PC Mag (then PC Magazine) and the journalists that I interned under would say the same thing. Why? Well, that guy slows everyone else down in the group.

This is one of the primary reasons why I don’t use backpacks for my photo gear, but when it comes to packing loads and loads of stuff on you in a comfortable yet low profile and fashionable way, it’s very tough to beat the Langly Alpha Pro backpack. Sure, backpacks don’t give you the quick, on the go access that a messenger or tote bag do, but it makes up for it in being able to carry lots of stuff on a daily excursion.

Made of canvas and leather, Langly camera bags join ONA, zKin, Artisan and Artist  and others amongst the lineup of beautiful camera bags designed to also be very functional as a camera bag.

So how does it do? To be honest, Langly may have everyone else beat when it comes to the adventure photographer.

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Chris Gampat the Phoblographer Sony Rx100 Mk III and Canon G1x Mk II comparison (5 of 7)ISO 400001-60 sec at f - 1.8

It looks like Sony may be trying to get into the Four Thirds world–or at least that’s what some crazy report is stating on Sony Alpha Rumors. According to the site (which is usually pretty darn accurate) Sony will be launching two cameras with Four Thirds sized sensors and that are meant to directly compete with the Panasonic LX100.

But in addition to that, one camera will also have a 24MP APS-C sized sensor while the 4/3 sensors are 20MP and 16MP. We truly wonder if these will be 4/3 sensors or if they will be a little bit larger and more similar to what Canon did with the G1X series of cameras. These will also most likely be more premium offerings than the RX100 series; which have sold tremendously well and continue to evolve into better cameras. The combination of a small size and powerful image quality seems to be the sweet spot for many consumers.

Knowing Sony, the cameras are bound to have fast zoom lenses–though we’d be more partial to something closer in relation to the RX1 and the fixed prime lens on the camera.

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer LCDVF Fader ND Mamiya (8 of 11)

There is almost nothing better than having the benefit of a small rangefinder camera body and the large negative area of medium format film. While this isn’t available yet in a digital edition, lots of photographers want it. But those who want this also know how incredibly good lots of the medium format film rangefinder cameras are.

Indeed, most folks talk about the SLR cameras because they’re cheap; but there are lots and lots of film rangefinders that would possibly make you put down your digital camera and keep it in a box somewhere to gather dust once you see the incredible quality that these cameras are capable of.

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