How NatGeo’s Traveler Photo Contest Proved that the Camera Doesn’t Matter

 

Diving with a humpback whale and her new born calf while they cruise around Roca Partida Island, in Revillagigedo, Mexico. This is an outstanding and unique place full of pelagic life so we need to accelerate the incorporation of this islands into UNESCO as a natural heritage site in order to increase the protection of the islands against the prevailing ilegal fishing corporations and big game fishing.

Whale Whisperers. © Anuar Patjane

When National Geographic announced the winners of its Traveler Photo Contest, all anyone could talk about was the first place image: a magnificent underwater image replete with whales, fish, divers and bursts of water. The divers, in various stages of descent, are minuscule compared to the enormous creatures. People often misuse the word “epic” to describe things that don’t nearly meet the requirements of that word, but in this case, I feel fully comfortable saying that it is an epic photograph. Perhaps one of the most remarkable things about it was that the photographer, Anuar Patjane, shot it with a point-and-shoot, the Sony RX100. Of course, it’s only a part of what makes the image, but it’s an aspect that says a great deal.

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Anuar Patjane Brilliantly Photographs Life Underwater

Diving with a humpback whale and her new born calf while they cruise around Roca Partida Island, in Revillagigedo, Mexico. This is an outstanding and unique place full of pelagic life so we need to accelerate the incorporation of this islands into UNESCO as a natural heritage site in order to increase the protection of the islands against the prevailing ilegal fishing corporations and big game fishing.

Whale Whisperers.

All photographs are copyrighted and used with permission by Anuar Patjane.

It is underwater where Anuar Patjane made an image that turned heads. A mother humpback and whale and her newborn calf swam towards some divers in the Pacific Ocean near Mexico, and Patjane pressed the shutter. The image shown above went on to win National Geographic’s Traveler Photo Contest recently, and we couldn’t help but reach out to find out more about Patjane’s work underwater.

For more of his work, check out his website and follow him on Instagram.

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