Exploring Why Photographers Did or Didn’t Pick Up a Camera on 9/11

What made some of our community members pick up a camera, while others chose to leave the gear at home and take in the traumatic experience of 9/11?

We all face the dilemma of photographing the moment vs. being ‘in’ the moment. Inarguably, our view behind the lens can be completely different than the view absent of one. We encounter it regularly when it’s a beautiful sunset, moments with friends, cute episodes with my cats, etc. These moments are superfluous and trivial in comparison to the gravity that is the traumatic experience of experiencing 9/11 firsthand. With that said, the question remains – do I want to document what I’m seeing, or experience what I’m seeing? To explore this concept, while also giving appropriate reverence to the anniversary we’re coming upon, we interviewed two wonderful photographers who lived in the city and were present the day of the attacks. Ron Jautz chose to leave his camera at home, while Thomas Donley grabbed his gear and ran out the door. While one chose to make photographs and the other chose to experience the moment, their answers reflect many similar sentiments. Continue reading…

This Time Lapse of the 9/11 Memorial Took 10 Years to Create

Screen Shot 2014-05-19 at 7.43.50 AM

Following the very emotional, very moving National September 11 Museum dedication on May 15 when President Obama once again led many to remembering those who were lost in the 9/11 tragedy, webcam network EarthCam released an HD time-lapse video showing the construction of the museum as well as its twin reflection pools.

Produced and directed by EarthCam CEO and founder Brian Cury, this amazing two and a half minute video serves as the culmination of the many web cameras the network installed at the World Trade Center even before the rebuilding efforts and of the over 1 million images they had gathered.

The video, the official commemoration video for the 9/11 Memorial Museum, documents the museum’s almost 13-year construction from October 2004 to May 2014. It covers everything from the groundbreaking to its completion, as seen from high vantage points, and features the Survivor Tree, which has become an important symbol of strength, resilience, and survival in the complex.

It’s EarthCam’s way of honoring the 9/11 victims and is dedicated to their families and friends as well as the men who were involved in the rescue and recovery efforts.

The museum itself officially opens to the public on May 21st but we can already watch the commemorative video. See it after the jump.

 

Via Gothamist

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