The Secrets of Photography Hidden Within Edward Weston’s Home

Featured image is a screen capture from the video. All credit to Advancing Your Photography. 

Edward Weston, one of the most influential American photographers of the early 20th century, is known for his work in championing extremely detailed imagery that was so far removed from the soft focus look popular during his time. He spent over 40 years photographing and developing a style of imagery that to this day photographers reference for inspiration.

Weston was diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease in 1947 and spent the remaining years of his life printing thousands of his most famous images before passing away in 1958. Much of his knowledge and some interesting stories have been passed down through his family, and in this video from Marc Sibler and Advancing Your Photography, we get a special tour through Weston’s old home by his Grandson – Kim.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bUAKoiRhLR8&feature=youtu.be

How about that tidbit about ‘Pepper No.30’ being shot at roughly F240?! You don’t hear about photographers experimenting with things like that much these days, but in the time, Weston was experimenting and developing a craft – so nothing was off limits. As well, how about that 4-6 hour exposure window? We could have done 3-4 full shoots with probably over 1000 images in that sort of time period. It really helps you appreciate such a famous image knowing what went into it.

We also found some of the insights into his nude work, which Weston was also very well known for, quite interesting. For example, the bit about how the shadow bothering him despite it being essential to the image – it’s such a classic feeling that we think many photographers can relate to.

Make sure to check out more from Marc Sibler and  Advancing Your Photography over on their Youtube Channel, here. It is full of great content like this and other looks back into photography’s past that can help inspire you into the future.