Photographer Zeb Andrews Caught a Beautiful, Rare Moment in Nature

“…I have learned to not dwell on the images I may or may not be making and instead just enjoy the process of making them,” explains photographer Zeb Andrews. He adds, “it is a lot of fun.” For most folks, Zeb doesn’t need an introduction. We’ve featured him on our site a few times. The Bruce Wayne persona of Zeb is one of the folks in charge of Blue Moon camera: undeniably one of the best vintage and analog photography stores. I speak with him weekly for our Rare Camera Store initiative. And when the night hits, Zeb dons a metaphorical photo vest and ventures out to make exciting photos. Below are just some of them.

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How To Clean Camera Lenses. Over 15 Experts Give Feedback

Recently, I saw a heartbreaking post on a Facebook group about cleaning a vintage camera lens with Hydrogen Peroxide. The photographer wanted to get rid of fungus on the lens. But instead, they ended up destroying the optics. They cited photographers on YouTube who say this is the thing to do. And unfortunately, that’s the problem. Lots of photographers on YouTube aren’t experts. If you wanted official information on something more pressing, it’s often best to check out .edu, .org. or .gov websites. Don’t get me wrong, we’re a .com website. But we’re also an accredited source of information. And besides, over the past decade, we’ve asked some of the best and brightest minds how to do this.

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The Museum of Cameras is Blue Moon’s Love Letter to the Camera Geek

If the Blue Moon Museum of Cameras were a real place, Google Maps would label it as Heaven.

I don’t know about you, but I’m still being cautious. I don’t really want to use my museum memberships during COVID-19. But it’s been cool to see how the world has adapted. It’s opened up a lot of opportunities. And camera retailer Blue Moon Camera has used this time to create the Museum of Cameras. The museum isn’t at physical location though; it’s parked on their website. Though I’d totally entertain the idea of a physical camera museum, and I’d imagine it would have a cafe, a book store, a used camera store, various exhibits about the history of photography, parties every first Friday night, various photo booths, and a killer weekly newsletter. But until Blue Moon Camera considers making a location where you can smell the film, their virtual portal is pretty awesome.

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How the Contax T2 Became the Most Expensive Point and Shoot Camera

The Contax T2 wasn’t exactly cheap to begin with, but a number of factors pushed it to become the trendiest and most expensive point and shoot film camera today. 

Most likely to the surprise of many, the Contax T2 took the spot as the most expensive (and hyped) point and shoot camera you can get your hands on today, that is if you can pay for it. In the last few years, prices for this premium camera have gone to insane levels, thanks in part to the renewed interest in film photography. The other part we can certainly tie to curious celebrities picking up the camera.

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A Musing and History of the Pentax 67 SLR

All images and text by Zeb Andrews over at Blue Moon Camera. Used with permission.

Where to start with the Pentax 6×7? How about if we start with the fact that I love this camera; so this way you know exactly where I am coming from as you read this. I have been using this camera for over a decade now, and though I now carry other cameras with me more frequently, my Pentax has a special place in my camera lineup that no other camera can compete with.

The Pentax 6×7 is not that dissimilar to most 35mm SLR cameras –  if you gave those cameras steroids and pumped them up to twice their original size. The Pentax 6×7 is a pretty straight-forward camera. Exposure is done entirely manually, it uses its own line of bayonet mount lenses, can accept alternative prisms (including a meter prism and a waist level viewfinder) and is able to use either 120 or 220 film, creating either 10 or 21 6x7cm exposures per roll. The camera is a beastly tank, but such a good beastly tank. At the time of its introduction, it did exactly what a pro photographer needed it to: make 6x7cm medium format images while viewing through the camera’s main lens… and it did it well and surprisingly ergonomically for its size and weight.

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Jonathan Moore: Surreal and Creative Landscape Photography on Film

All images by Jonathan Moore. Used with permission.

“I think I’ve been multi-talented in the arts for a long time and photography just stuck with me.” says photographer Jonathan Moore in an email to the Phoblographer. “I grew up in a few small towns in Tennessee. After high school, I worked odd jobs and toured the southeast playing guitar in a hardcore band.” Art stuck with and evolved with Jon quite a bit: from music into graphic design and then photography. Jon’s photographs draw obvious inspiration from movies and you can see influences from Stranger Things and Lord of the Rings for sure.

“Movies are often over-looked in terms of fine art, but pause anywhere during 2001: A Space Odyssey or There Will Be Blood, and you’ll know what I’m talking about.”

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Kenneth Leishman: Compelling Color Pinhole Photography

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All images by Kenneth Leishman. Used with permission.

Pinhole images I’ve always thought were absolutely stunning, beautiful and the absolute best works of art when it came to landscape photography. But in my years as an editor, I’ve never seen a good one done in color–until last week.

Photographer Kenneth Leishman is who “along the way of experimenting with jobs I did not care for, and things I did not need, a camera fell into my lap.” he tells us. It took a while for Ken to find his groove, but when he did he realized that he loved the analogue process and that the slow ways of working with pinholes is what really jived with him.

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Five Reasons You Should be Shooting Pinhole Right Now

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This post by Jana Uyeda originally appeared on Jana-Obscura.com on March 17, 2014, and is being syndicated at The Phoblographer with the author’s permission.

My friends in the art world often use the expression, “Restrictions breed creativity,” a phrase which certainly applies to the imaginative and often inventive world of pinhole photography. While the basic concept of pinhole remains the same – a light-tight box with a tiny aperture – it’s how you manipulate light to capture an image that really empowers your creativity. From DIY projects to local craftsmen to 3D printed cameras, interest in pinhole cameras is on the rise. If you have never experimented with pinhole photography or left your Holga 120WPC on the bottom shelf for too long, it’s time get shooting again. Here are five reasons why this is the best time to be shooting pinhole.

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