This Vintage Camera Paradise in Finland Is a Film Photographer’s Dream

Attention, film photographers! If you have a dream vintage camera or lens, there’s a big chance you’ll spot it in this mind-blowing spot in Finland!

Are you a film photographer still looking to tick a dream vintage camera or lens off your wishlist? Or are you a vintage photography gear collector with an insatiable curiosity for what’s still out there? Maybe you’re a photographer with a taste for weird and wonderful photography contraptions? If you answered yes t any of these, you’re in for a treat in the latest videos by Paris-based photographer and filmmaker Mathieu Stern.

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5 Awesome Vintage Camera Pieces of Furniture Every Photographer Needs

Photographers, there’s no great reason why you shouldn’t have some cool and camera related house wares.

There’s a trend in the design world to take old, non-functional cameras and to make them into cool pieces for apartment decoration. I mean, just imagine candle lanterns but made out of a camera of some sort! If you’re one of those photographers who likes those Lens Mugs, then you’re probably going to adore all these cool decorations that you can get for your home at a pretty affordable price.

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Vintage Camera Review: Fujifilm Natura S (The Best Point and Shoot You’ve Never Heard Of)

The Fujifilm Natura S is quickly becoming my favorite point and shoot camera.

When you look on the market, you’re going to find stuff like Contax T2 to be very pricey. The chances that you’re not looking for the Fujifilm Natura S are high. But, the Fujifilm Natura S potentially has a lot more going for it than you’d think. This small point and shoot is easily pocketable and despite its very compact size, it sports a 24mm f1.9 lens. Yes, that’s right; that’s one of the widest and fastest lenses you can get on a point and shoot. It also comes in a variety of colors like green, the pink that I’ve gotten a hold of, and there is a variant called the Fujifilm Natura Black. There is also a version with a zoom lens simply called the Fujifilm Natura. But the Natura S is really where it’s at; its simple interface and not serious look is going to guarantee that you take it with you everywhere.

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Drool Over David Silver’s Impressive Vintage Camera Collection

How does your vintage camera collection stack up to this collection?

Everyone, meet your new photography hero. In a recent episode of Gizmodo’s Show Me Your Nerd, California-based vintage camera collector historian David Silver showcased his beautiful collection of mid-century cameras — all of them beautifully displayed on their dedicated shelves and screaming the vintage aesthetic that has been popular in the last few years. If you’re looking for inspiration to grow your camera collection, he’s definitely someone who fits the bill!

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Vintage Camera Review: Leica M4-P (Leica M Mount)

The Leica M4-P is one of the most beloved Leica cameras and it isn’t too expensive either!

If you ever happen to stumble on a deal like I did with the Leica M4-P, then snag it as soon as you possibly can. In many ways, the Leica M4-P is one of the most perfect analog cameras. Although the Leica M6 goes a step further and incorporates the inclusion of a working light meter while allowing the camera to operate completely and totally mechanically at all shutter speeds, the Leica M4-P is essentially the Leica M6 without a light meter. And if you’re like me, you don’t always need a light meter because you’ve shot so often that you know and understand how Sunny 16 works, or you’ve got an app on your phone that will help you figure out your lighting with ease.

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Vintage Camera Review: The Polaroid SX70

The Polaroid SX70 is one of the most iconic and well known analog film cameras ever made. It was designed to be simple to use, compact, yet versatile. In today’s culture, it is a camera often associated with the hipster culture, and many people don’t even know that film is still made for it. Using film from the Impossible Project and Polaroid originals, your Polaroid SX70 is an option bound to not only look great on a bookcase, but also will be fun to use. Many companies tend to buy them up, refurbish them and then flip them for sale.

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Vintage Camera Review: Olympus XA2

The Olympus XA2 probably isn’t as famous at its predecessor, but it is quite a beautiful and simple camera to use. In some ways I think about it as Olympus’ version of the Lomography LCA camera. It’s characterized by its simple operation, its very interesting flash design, its small size, and its pretty darned good image quality. These days, I’d strongly recommend it as a compact film shooter for anyone who loves street photography or even just wants something incredibly pocketable. Where the Olympus XA had aperture priority control, the Olympus XA2 doesn’t. Instead, you’ve got ISO control and zone focusing. That’s it. Otherwise, you’re at the mercy of a very good light meter. Of course, you can always trick the camera using ISO changes, but you may not want to do that all the time.

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Vintage Camera Review: Nikon N80 (Nikon F Mount)

For a really long time, the Nikon F100 was the best buy if you were looking for a Nikon film SLR at a good price that was compatible with most modern lenses. But then people discovered it, and like everything that gets discovered, the price got ruined. The Nikon FM2? Yeah, they’re really expensive now. It’s no secret second hand film cameras are on the up and up when it comes to prices and sales. Not only that, but they’re pretty. Well, most of them are. In the case of the Nikon N80, we’ve got the camera designed to be more consumer oriented and a step down below the famous Nikon F100. But for everything a professional photographer could want or need, it’s highly capable. And unlike digital cameras, all you need is some sharp film, good glass, and a lot of light.

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Vintage Camera Review: Mamiya 6 Medium Format Rangefinder (120 Format, 6×6 Square Format)

The Mamiya 6 is a camera that I’ve lusted after for many years; and when the opportunity to get one with two lenses for an absolutely unheard of price, I knew that I needed to spring for it. As one of the few great compact interchangeable lens rangefinders that use medium format film, the Mamiya 6 is in my mind one of the most perfect square format cameras ever made. While some may pledge allegiance to Hasselblad and other to Bronica when it comes to SLR cameras, still other will stand by some of the best TLR options on the market that shoot 6×6 format. In many ways, I want you to imagine a Leica M series camera but bigger and plastic. On top of that, this camera is collapsible and has a few features to it that could be considered quirks but in other ways are fail safes.

If you’re the type of photographer that needs a compact medium format shooter the way that I do, then there is almost nothing better.

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Vintage Camera Review: Pentax 67 (67 Format)

The Pentax 67 has to be one of the most drooled over medium format SLR cameras ever made. For great reasons too! The Pentax 67 is a film SLR that is more or less designed to be portable and shot handheld by fashion photographers and portrait photographers. For many years it was well regarded and even today, there is some fantastic work that is often done with the camera. Between this, the Pentax 67 II and the Mamiya RB67/RZ67, lots of photographers really have a tough choice figuring out what they want.

The truth is that it really depends on your style and it also really depends on how good you are at being able to create photos.

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Vintage Camera Review: Canon EOS 33 (Canon EF Mount)

If you were to look at any of the best Canon EOS film cameras made, you probably wouldn’t think immediately about the Canon EOS 33. But indeed, it and the Canon Elan 7 are surely some of the best. These cameras incorporate features that make a whole lot of sense for most modern film shooters and don’t cater to the film shooting sports photographer–if even such a thing exists. One of the best things about the Canon EOS 33 is not only its price point but also just how reliable it is.

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Vintage Camera Review: Pentax Spotmatic (M42 Screwmount)

Pentax has has a number of great cameras over the years, but if you’re going to get something cheap and reliable, one of the best options has to be the Pentax Spotmatic. The little camera is one of the first options to offer a TTL (through the lens) light meter though otherwise is completely mechanical. With that said, it still truthfully doesn’t need a battery or the light meter to operate–which is a lot light many Leica, Zeiss and Voigtlander rangefinders. That means that even if the battery dies, you can still shoot and get perfectly usable photos if you’ve got just a bit of light metering knowledge. The Pentax Spotmatic was designed during a time when folks typically shot photos in full shutter speeds vs 1/3rd options of today. So with that said, you’ll want to pay close attention to the film that you’re loading up and your own intentions when it comes to shooting.

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Vintage Camera Review: Minolta Maxxum 7 (Minolta a7)

No, this isn’t the Sony a7, but the Minolta a7 is perhaps one of the best film Alpha mount cameras that you can still get your hands on used. While the Minolta a9 is considered the flagship, there are features built into the Minolta a7 that can make it much more appealing. For starters, it’s much lighter. And there is also a built in data back that lets you change a whole lot of parameters in a very simple way.

And to be honest, it’s one of the best autofocusing film SLR cameras I’ve ever used–completely putting a lot of what Canon and Nikon created to shame.

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Reliable, Mechanical Vintage Cameras You’ll Want to Shoot With

Compact film cameras are a big thing more so now than they have ever been before. But one of the biggest problems with lots of them has to do with the fact that the electronics in them break down after a really long time. In a case like that, it’s sometimes just best to use an all mechanical camera with much better reliability.

So with that said, here are a number of (mostly) mechanical cameras that you’ll surely want to get your hands on.

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5 Common Problems to Look for When Buying Vintage Cameras

Words by Nick Mayo. Content put together exclusively for the Phoblographer by Chris Gampat.

Who doesn’t enjoy the thrill of finding that gem of a camera in your local thrift store, flea market or the garage sale down the street? Thousands of old film cameras hit the used market each and every day, and in Nick Mayo’s recent video series he gives as he calls it a “somewhat of a comprehensive field guide” on the subject matter. In this article, Nick will go a couple steps deeper in pointing out some of the common pitfalls you should be looking out for when “thrift store camera hunting.”

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Vintage Camera Review: Leica CL (Leitz Minolta CL, Minolta CLE)

Years ago, I owned a Leica CL when I was getting into photography. Trying to balance an understanding of both film and digital, I toted this around with my old school Olympus E-510 DSLR. They were perfect together for a college student. But then I needed money, and unfortunately had to sell my Leica. Very recently though, I took the plunge before my 30th birthday and bought myself another one. You see, the Leica CL is the same camera as the Minolta CLE and the Leitz Minolta CL.

Some consider it not a true Leica because it wasn’t made in Germany. Instead, the Leica CL was a collaboration between Minolta and Leica. It was a camera that sold very well and perhaps too well. In fact, it’s rumored that sales were so good that they discontinued the camera because it ate into the sales of the Leica M5.

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Vintage Camera Review: Fujifilm GW690 III (6×9 Medium Format)

When Fujifilm announced their medium format digital camera, a whole lot of people really wanted it to be something along the lines of the Fujifilm GW690 III camera–also known as the Texas Leica. This rangefinder camera shoots in the 6×9 format–which is one of the largest formats to use 120 film. For many years it was used by hobbyists, travel photographers, landscape photographers, and even a few portrait shooters. Due to its 90mm lens equivalent, you’re getting around a 38mm f1.2 equivalent when it comes to field of view converted to full frame.

When I purchasef this camera, I genuinely thought it would be the perfect medium format rangefinder for me, doing pretty much everything the Mamiya 7 II is capable of sans interchangeable lenses. But with more experience, I learned that I was wrong.

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This Vintage Camera Video Ad Was Shot With the Nikon F5

Lead photo by Tahir Hashmi. Used with Creative Commons permission.

These days, it’s not uncommon to see timelapse videos shot with just still cameras; but it was very uncommon to see it back in 1997 and done with the Nikon F5. A vintage ad (yes, because the 90s are vintage), this commercial was shot in 1997 by Alastair Thain using the Nikon F5 camera! According to the YouTube description, this was the first time a stills camera had ever been used to shoot “moving images”. More than 200 rolls of 35mm film were developed for the commercial, in rolls of 36 shots each. These were spliced, graded for colour, and edited.

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This Video Of A Vintage Camera Repair Man Will Inspire You To Shoot Film

Screenshots taken from video. 

Since the digital photography revolution, it was an especially challenging period of time for die-hard film lovers to adapt or change. Some have clung on to the art of nostalgic analog photography, and Gian Luigi Carminati carried on this tradition by spending his entire life repairing cameras. We have found this short video made by David Drills documenting the story of Gian Luigi Carminati and his love for film cameras.

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Vintage Camera Review: Mamiya RB67 Pro-S (6×7 Format)

A few years ago, I was told that a Hasselblad digital camera was going to kill the 120 format of film. At the time, I was absolutely astounded. For many years, I believed it to a certain point. 645 digital is good; in fact, it’s very good. But very few pieces of work out there have really delivered to me what I feel is that true medium format look. It’s what so many photographers strive for. But if you’re working with a camera like the Mamiya RB67 Pro-S, it’s impossible to not get that look you’re craving. A true workhorse camera for a portrait or landscape photographer, this camera has been in my arsenal for a fair amount of time now and I’ve often considered it to be my crown jewel.

If anything, it’s proven that 645 digital is close to the larger formats of 120 film, but it still isn’t totally there to me.

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Vintage Camera Review: Nikon N2020

One day last year, my uncle gave me a gift that rekindled my interest in 35mm film photography–the Nikon N2020. My delight to hear him say, “It has a motor focus,” was followed by a chuckle of appreciation. Ever since I was a young boy, he knew how much I loved playing with new toys and this wasn’t really any sort of exception. The Hexar AF is the camera that turned that kindle into a raging, fiery passion; but the N2020 has quite a bit going for it that makes it wonderful in some ways. Quirky, fun, reliable, and compact–I can tell why so many people genuinely loved this camera.

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