Lomography LomoChrome Purple Now Comes in 110 Format

With Lomography’s latest news, it’s time to take your parents’ 110 cameras out for a spin with the dreamy LomoChrome Purple.

Looking for the perfect opportunity to bust out your 110 film camera? Now would be a great time as ever, as Lomography has recently launched their prized LomoChrome Purple film in 110 format. If you’ve already tried this famed film in 35mm and 120 formats, why not give it a go in this miniature format as well?

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Verena Kersting Captures an Extra Surreal Iceland Using LomoChrome Purple Film

All LomoChrome Purple images by Verena Kersting. Used with permission.

The LomoChrome Purple film is without a doubt one of the trippiest, most interesting things we can enjoy with today’s film photography resurgence. It has become a film traveler’s staple, especially for locations with lots of greenery for pleasantly surreal keepsakes of their trips. Case in point is this captivating set that Germany-based Verena Kersting took during her trip to Iceland in 2013.

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Stéphane Maugendre Creates a Trippy Paradise Using LomoChrome Purple

All images by Stéphane Maugendre. Used with permission. 

French photographer Stéphane Maugendre is self-confessed to be “analog at heart” and so for his new series he turned to the LomoChrome Purple to lend it a surreal touch. Stéphane has always been fascinated by the old greenhouses that dot Paris. To him, these glass structures are remnants of a time when the only way Parisians could marvel at exotic wildlife from far regions of the world was to visit the zoo, natural history museums, botanical gardens, and the greenhouses. Continue reading…

Lomography LomoChrome Purple Got Updated to Give it Finer Grain

Missed your chance at the LomoChrome Purple 100-400? The purple potion promises to be more potent this time around with a new and improved formula.

To some film photographers, the LomoChrome Purple XR 100 – 400 has been quite an elusive emulsion. But perhaps this time, those who haven’t gotten their hands on it have the best chance of snagging some rolls of the so-called purple potion. According to Lomography, the latest version of this film, now available for pre-order, was “carefully crafted” to produce trippier hues and finer grain than ever before.

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Film Review: Lomography LomoChrome Purple 100-400 (35mm, New Emulsion)

A while back, Lomography LomoChrome Purple was released in 120 and 35mm formats. But earlier this year, the company updated the formula to make it more stable. With it came the major improvement of making it easier to shoot with. The current LomoChrome Purple formula allows a photographer to get great results whether they’re shooting at ISO 400 or ISO 100. Lomography states that you can rate it at either setting, as opposed to the older formula which needed a lot of light to create the best images. This new emulsion is available only in 35mm, but it provides finer grain and still very nice colors.

So if you’re the type who only wants to shoot in 120, then the size may put you off. But make no mistake, the quality is absolutely there.

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Lomography Announces a Brand New Formula for LomoChrome Purple 400

It’s been a few years since Lomography announced LomoChrome Purple, and just today they’ve announced a new update to the film. The new Lomochrome Purple 400 film is designed to be a whole lot more stable. With that said, we start out with a recommended and set exposure at ISO 400 vs the previous version of the film which was said to need a lot of light. To that end, it wasn’t uncommon that photographers shot it at ISO 200 or even 100. The new Lomochrome Purple will continue to shift blues to greens, greens to purples and yellows to pinks. The new emulsion increases the film’s sensitivity to red hues.

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Kate Hook’s Creative Portraiture with Lomography LomoChrome Purple

All images by Kate Hook. Used with permission.

Photographer Kate Hook was always into film photography–it stems from when she was really young. When she went to college, her friends never understood film and how to use it. But like a number of us millenials, Kate grew up in a world that started out with film, then went digital and is now going back to film. In college, she was the one who had to teach all her colleagues how to use it. Kate went digital for a while and then went back to film with the belief that you don’t need a whole lot of gear to create the best photos; just the right gear for you.

With that in mind, Kate has used the experimental Lomography LomoChrome Purple a few times to create some fantastic portraits. Along with shooting the film, she soups it in lemon juice. This is all part of Kate’s expressive creative process–which has roots partially in the loss of both of her parents.

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LomoChrome Purple Is Available for Pre-Order Again

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A while back, Lomography announced LomoChrome Purple. The first batch went out fast, and the second batch is now available for pre-order. It is available in 35mm and 120 formats. To refresh your memory, it is a film that is heavily based off of the old Kodak Aerochrome, which renders all greens as purples and pinks. This infrared film was also used for military applications, and lots more.

Still confused? We wrote a big guide about all this when it was first announced and it should help clear up the confusion. I was one of the first to pre-order a couple rolls of 120 film, and we will be sure to have a review on it as soon as we can get them shot and developed–let alone get me to a green spot. Lord knows there isn’t much in NYC.

What is Kodak Aerochrome? A Beginner’s Guide to The Confusion of Lomochrome Purple

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Photo by Richard Mosse

Today’s exciting announcement from Lomography about Lomochrome Purple is bound to get some people excited and others totally confused. First off, know that it is based off of Kodak Aerochrome–an old infrared film developed for government surveillance. Since it is infrared, that means that there are no real purple fields in the Congo.  So we’re here to answer a couple of big questions that you may have about the new film. Check out more information after the jump.

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UPDATED: Lomography Introduces Lomochrome Purple: Inspired by Kodak Aerochrome

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I really don’t believe this happened, but Lomography managed to do something that was essentially lost for years. Kodak Aerochrome was an infrared film used by the government for surveillance. What it did was took greens and converted them to red and purple. That way, guerrilla fighters could easily be spotted and air raids could take down encampments with relative ease.

Today, Lomography is creating something relatively close: Lomochrome Purple. They’re guaranteeing delivery to be around July 2013. Things aren’t totally what they seem to be though: this is a color negative film–which means that it takes C-41 processing. Chrome films typically need E6 processing. They have more sample images on their website if you’re interested.

Correction: I was wrong. According to Kodak, it takes regular C-41 processing.

The film will be available in 120 and 35mm formats. And they’re not cheap: 120’s regular price is € 59.50 wc comes out to $80.59 for a pack of five; but they have a special price of € 56.53 which is $76.57. 35mm film costs  € 49.50/$67.05 but the special price is $63.70.

We’re hunting around for more information, so stay tuned.

Update: Lomo got back to us with more information about the film. Georg Thaler, who leads the film development team had this to say, “After years of researching, thousands of tests and tons of failures, we finally found a way to shift colors of regular color negative films. This is why this film needs to be processed C 41. It’s basically a Color negative, so E6 is not the right choice for this film.”

The New Lomography Lomochrome Turquoise Film is Pretty Alien

Lomochrome Turqouise

Sometimes a product hits the market that makes us literally say “WTF!?” Today, that award goes to Lomography with their brand new Lomochrome Turquoise film. Based off of Lomochrome Purple (which was based off of Kodak Aerochrome) the company describes the film as taking warm colors and rendering them in shades of blue. But that’s not all. According to the company it is responsible for: “turning warm colors into varying shades of blues from aqua to cobalt, transforming greens into deep emerald shades, blue skies into a sunset and a crystal clear sea into a golden hue”

Essentially, it looks like a permanent cross process–which unless done correctly makes us want to cry and rub our eyes with fixer fluid.

The film is a brand new offering, and they’re expecting the first shipments of Lomography Lomochrome Turquoise to come in in April 2015. The film comes in packs of 5, 10, 15 and 20. They also have it available in 120 format and requires C-41 processing.But in our opinion, they’re a bit overpriced.

More images samples are after the jump.

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EXCLUSIVE: RNI Films is Working on Infrared Film Simulation Presets

We got an exclusive look at the next big project from RNI Films: Infrared Film Simulation Presets.

Photographers have been enamored with the look of Infrared films like Kodak Aerochrome. It spawned things like the creation of Lomochrome Purple and a few other emulsions. But, photographers have wanted it digitally for a while, which hasn’t been easy to create, and in fact, it still isn’t. But, RNI Films is working on a project to bring those to life. A film like this is pretty difficult to duplicate because of what it does–like turning greens into a red, purple, or pink. Granted, Aerochrome has been long gone for years, but photographers still pick it up on eBay or have some that’s frozen in their fridge. If you’ve been looking to find a way to get this look with ease, RNI films is arguably the best company to do so. They use a lot of science, studying, and time to figure out how to make just the right tweaks to images. So, we talked to Oliver on the company’s support team to discuss how this is all happening.

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Tip: Damage a Disposable Camera to Get a Different Look

Photographer Kate Hook is an experimental, creative, modern analog film photographer who loves experimenting with new ideas and tricks. We’ve featured her work here before when she souped her LomoChrome Purple film; and now she’s back with a video on having fun with a disposable camera. While most photographers would scoff at using one due to their plastic lenses and crappy quality, Kate has the idea of being experimental and embracing it. In fact, she takes it even further.

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The Phoblographer’s Guide to Lomography Film in 35mm and 120 Formats

Lomography isn’t a company that should be disregarded; they’ve got some fantastic films.

While some photographers look at Lomography as a reseller due to their rebadging of certain film emulsions, I don’t think that one can question just how much they’ve done for the analog film photography movement. The company that used to be branded as just a Hipster camera organization has grown and matured over the years into something else–creating many of their own unique lenses and taking advantage of just how well Instax does. If you’re looking for something sustainable and yet very good, you should consider their films.

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Five Lessons I’ve Learned Through Film Photography

All images by Julien Matabuena.

Let me begin by saying that this is by no means a discussion on which between digital or film photography is more superior; rather, this is an ode to my favorite medium. Like many people my age – I just turned 30, in case you’re wondering – my first brush with taking pictures was when I was a kid through my family’s resident point-and-shoot camera. But it wouldn’t be until college when I’d get my first proper cameras: a hand-me-down Minolta α-7700i SLR and a Sony DSLR (unfortunately, I no longer remember what model it was).

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VSCO and iPhone Don’t Replace Film, and This is Why

Shooting with film is a personal experience, and it’s nothing VSCO and other film emulators and smartphones can ever replace.

With life going on faster than I would have preferred, I often find myself turning to my iPhone SE and VSCO in the hopes of squeezing in a bit of photography practice in between commutes, ideation meetings, video shoots, and actual writing for work. I mostly use my iPhone because it and I are attached at the hip so it literally takes just a second for me to snap a photo of whatever tickles my fancy anytime. And to me, VSCO is the best in emulating that grainy, washed-out film look that I prefer over the sharpness of digital. I’ve tried lots of different apps over the years and I just find myself going back to it.

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Is Kosmo Foto Mono Film Just Rebranded Foma Film?

Kosmo Foto Mono seems to be causing some confusion with folks.

Remember Kosmo Foto Mono film? They rebrand from Zorki Photo to Kosmo Foto–and so too did the film they were producing. When this new film company came to life, we reported on it and the internet cheered. But it seems as if they are somehow or another causing some controversy on the web. Admittedly, they’re a curious company producing a film in a world where film seems to be making a comeback in some ways.

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Review: Lomography Simple Use Cameras

The Lomography Simple Use Cameras can easily be mistaken for disposable cameras, but they’re in fact not. Confused? Yeah, I was too the first time that I saw the press release, as when I looked at the cameras themselves, they straight up just looked like disposables. Then I did more digging. Lomography calls them the Simple Use cameras. They’re designed to look and function like disposable cameras but have some extra additions–like the ability to be reloaded and in some cases gels that go right over the flashes. They also cost a bit more than the standard disposable camera out there, but when you consider the fact they’re reloadable and in some cases they come with gels for the flash, then you’re not at all getting a bad deal.

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KONO! and Dubble Team Up to Create Sunstroke and Moonstruck 35mm Film Emulsions

The choice of Sunstroke & Moonstruck films is almost like what Poke’mon you’re going to choose

There are two brand new films on the market today: they’re called Dubblefilm Moonstruck and Dubblefilm Sunstroke. These films are a collaboration between KONO! and Dubble; and they’re available only in 35mm format. These aren’t your typical Kodak Gold, Fujifilm Superia or films like that. Instead, these are special films. Well, that depends on what your definition of special really is.

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