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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Metz flash product photos (6 of 10)ISO 6401-50 sec at f - 4.0

While lots of the pro photographers teaching workshops may tell you to take the flash out of the hot shoe, it’s a necessity for many photographers who shoot weddings, photojournalism, and events. For these photographers, it’s pretty much the only option that is also the most convenient that allows them to focus on shooting. Bare flashes as they are aren’t the most effective, and the best thing to do is to modify the light output a bit to give you better images to deliver to your clients.

If you’re stuck leaving your flash in the hot shoe, then consider these flash modifiers.

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Wedding party - Alemdar 2003

Wedding party – Alemdar 2003

All images are copyrighted Arjen Zwart, and are being used with permission.

The music could be heard from several blocks away. It was a comfortable volume at that distance, but as we got closer, I slid two earplugs in that would serve as my saving grace. Children in mismatched clothes ran all over the side street as a tight circle of Roma men and women danced in a circle around the bride and groom. The music was a Gypsy spin on popular tunes, and it barreled out of the speakers with the intensity of a thunderstorm. The earplugs were wisely suggested by Arjen Zwart, a Dutch photographer who invited me to this brilliantly colorful and very loud ceremony of Gypsy matrimony. He had a pair of earplugs, too, that he only removed when a Roma he knew leaned in to talk with him.

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Epic-Photography-65

This blog post was originally published by Chris Garbacz. It is being syndicated with permission.

Have you ever wondered what it would be like to shoot a wedding? That is exactly what this wedding photography for beginners post is all about!

I’m super excited to share this with you, a full overview, behind the scenes of exactly what goes on, the fun stuff, the stressful stuff, what needs to be prepared and basically just a really awesome summary of the whole day, start to end.

Weddings are a serious matter, the real deal and you don’t get any second chances. That’s why you need to be prepared, organized and know your stuff!

So, let’s set the scene: you have booked the wedding a year ago, regularly communicated with the couple throughout the year, had a pre-wedding meeting to go through the timeline of the day and all other details (I’ll go through this in detail in another post), and now the time has come, tomorrow is the wedding day!

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julius motal the phoblographer iso 400 rinzi ruiz 07

In this episode of ISO 400, we hear from Rinzi Ruiz, a street and wedding photographer based in Los Angeles. Towards the of 2011, Ruiz was laid off a job he had for 10 years, and this gave him time to focus on his photography. He found his zen in street photography on the streets of Los Angeles. His high contrast monochrome images are deeply meditative, and they have excellent lighting.

He became known for a blog called Street Zen, in which he posts images he makes on the street. More of his work can be found on his website and his Instagram.

A selection of his work and the episode can be seen after the break.

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Film Photos Kodak Porta Ektar TriX  (8 of 55)

Being a second shooter is sometimes frightening. In some ways, you’re shadowing another photographer but in other ways, you’re maintaining your own individuality without being overpowering. Many second shooters are just starting out and you’ll need to keep one very big thing in mind the entire time: photography isn’t about gear first and foremost. Primarily, it’s about business. Then it’s about your portfolio. And then it’s about capabilities and gear.

If you’re a second shooter or aspiring to be one, then here’s what you should know.

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KO_Mar15_Wedding_8KeyShotPositions (1)

Infographic by Kelby One

 

Photographers shooting weddings for a while typically know where they have to be positioned and sometimes get the opportunity to scout a location out beforehand. But before you even step into the venue, you should have somewhat of an idea. The folks over at KelbyOne created an infographic explaining where you should positioned. Each number corresponds to an area for the ceremony and has tips included.

For more though, you should check out our essential shot list for a wedding and our massive roundup of tips, interviews and tutorials for wedding photography.